Dr. Erika Kidd portrait

Dr. Erika Kidd

Assistant Professor, Catholic Studies; Director, Master of Arts in Catholic Studies
Office
Sitzmann Hall 201
Phone
(651) 962-5788

Academic History:

Ph.D. Philosophy, Villanova University
M.A. Philosophy, Villanova University
B.A. University Scholars (Philosophy, Literature, and Classics), Baylor University

Expertise and Research:

Augustine and the Augustinian tradition
Wittgenstein (particularly his sense of confessional philosophy)
Late antique philosophy

Selected Publications:

“The Drama of De Magistro,”Studia Patristica XCVIII, Vol. 24, (Leuven: Peeters, 2017), 133-139.

“Two-Part Invention: Voices from Augustine of Hippo's De magistro and Samuel Beckett’s Endgame.” Philosophy and Literature  40 (2016): 480-494.

“Making Sense of Virgil in De magistro.” Augustinian Studies  46 (2015): 211-224.

Selected Presentations:

“Praying in the Bedchambers of the Heart: Augustine on Prayer and Intimacy, North American Patristics Society, Chicago, IL, May 2017.

“Parting Words: Augustine on Language and Loss,” Braniff Conference on the Liberal Arts, University of Dallas, January 2017 (Invited plenary address). Substantially revised version of this lecture delivered for the Patricia H. Imbesi Augustine Fellow public lecture, Villanova University, April 2017

“How to Talk to Your Father: Some Augustinian Counsel, Templeton Honors College Honors Forum, Eastern University, March 2017 (Invited lecture)

"The Drama of Augustine's De magistro," XVII International Conference on Patristic Studies, Oxford, August 2015

"Words, Afterwards," Le Moyne College, Syracuse, NY, April 2015 (Invited Lecture)

“Saint Augustine’s De magistro and Samuel Beckett’s Endgame: A Theological Fugue,” Philosophy Unbound: Annual Philosophy Conference, Lehigh University, October 23, 2014

“The Meaning of Virgil’s Words in Augustine’s De magistro,” North American Patristics Society, Chicago, IL, May 23, 2014

“Augustine’s Voice in Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations,” Stakes of Speech: A Summer Seminar on Wittgenstein in the Spirit of Cavell and Rhees, Lehigh University, July 12, 2012

“Verbum et Vita: Augustine’s De magistro and the Annunciation,” Patristic, Medieval and Renaissance Conference, Villanova University, October 23, 2010

Honors and Grants:

Faculty Development Grant: University Research Grant, 2018

Patricia H. Imbesi Saint Augustine Fellowship: Villanova University, Visiting Research Fellow, Spring 2017

LuAnn Dummer Women’s Center Curriculum Development Grant, 2015

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 301 - D01 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

40980 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 301 - D02 The Catholic Vision - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S 207

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

42590 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

At the center of the Catholic vision are the two great works of divine love: creation and redemption. This course considers the implications of these divine works for a radical reconsideration of the world and the human person. Students will examine characteristic Catholic approaches to and emphases concerning creation, redemption and ecclesiology, and discuss how Catholic understandings of creation and redemption inform, respond to, and critique Catholic practices in various cultural settings. In addition, the course will compare and contrast contemporary Catholic cultural monuments with that produced in earlier eras, and compare and contrast Catholic Christianity with other forms of Christian and non-Christian belief and practices. In illustrating its themes, the course draws upon sources in art, literature, history, philosophy, and theology with special attention given to the intellectual, spiritual, and cultural consequences of Catholic doctrine. Prerequisites: Junior standing and CATH 101 and 201

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CSMA 599 - 02 Aesthetics on Confessions II - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

43592 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2019 Courses

Spring 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
CATH 101 - D01 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

21421 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CATH 101 - D02 The Search for Happiness M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 55S 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

55S 207

Course Registration Number:

20386 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd

This course provides a critical investigation into the quest for meaning and happiness as found in the Catholic tradition. Beginning with fundamental Catholic claims about what it means to be a human being, this course explores the call to beatitude in materials from several disciplines, including theology, philosophy, literature, and art, as well as ancient, medieval, and contemporary sources. Topics explored include a consideration of human persons in relation to divine persons, the supernatural end to human life, the human person as experiencing desire and suffering, the Christian paradox that joy may be found in the giving of one's self, and the search for happiness through friendship and love. Through all these topics, the course particularly examines the question, "What is the specifically unique character of Christian happiness?"

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - 07 HONORS Suffering Saints - T - - - - - 1330 - 1510 55S B10

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

55S B10

Course Registration Number:

21786 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

2 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Erika H. Kidd, Thomas D. Feeney

These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)