February 18, 2019

February 18, 2019

Center for Campus Ministry: February 18

Here's What's Happening this Week

Center for Ministry

Center for Campus Ministry: February 18

From Our Chaplain

Tommie Catholic

Peace Meals

Night Light

Silent Retreat

Something More

Catholic Conversations

News & Announcements from the Archdiocese & More


From Our Chaplain

Chaplain

‌Many of us walk through Dorsey Way on the second floor in Anderson Student Center or study in Dorsey Commons at the east end of the hall just outside the Center for Campus Ministry.  However, how many have taken time to read the story of Father John Henry Dorsey, the first African-American student at the University of St. Thomas?

John Henry "Harry" Dorsey, born in Baltimore in 1874, came to this campus at the invitation of Archbishop John Ireland to prepare for the priesthood at St Thomas Aquinas Seminary in 1888.  Father Dorsey remained on campus for a year and then returned to his home in Baltimore, Maryland to complete his education at St Joseph Seminary.  Father Dorsey was ordained to the priesthood in 1902 becoming only the second African American to be ordained within the United States.

Father Dorsey quickly earned a reputation as a powerful preacher.  He was invited to preach missions throughout the country and was subsequently offered a position at St. Joseph Catechetical College in Montgomery, Alabama where he remained until becoming the pastor of a parish in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Unsubstantiated charges of misconduct caused him to be removed prematurely from his assignment and return to Montgomery.  However, he continued his preaching missions through the southern part of the United States from 1909-1917.  Eventually he returned to Baltimore to teach where he died following the attack of an angry man, the father of one of Father Dorsey's students on 30 June, 1926.

This quote summarizes Dorsey's difficult priesthood:  "Despite his success and achievements, Dorsey faced relentless criticism and hostility because of his race...Many bishops and priests had little sympathy for the idea of a black Catholic priesthood and gave no support to black priests."  (http://www.anb.org/view/10.1093/anb/9780198606697.001.0001/anb-9780198606697-e-0802278)

For more information about the courageous trailblazer, Father John Dorsey see the article by Stephen Ochs, "The Ordeal of the Black Priest," U.S Catholic Historian 5 (1986): 45-66.


Tommie Catholic presents:

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Peace Meals


Night Light


Registration is now open for the Silent Retreat (Feb 22-24, Christ the King Retreat Center). During this retreat, we will spend time in reflection and prayer aimed at becoming more aware of the presence of God in our lives. We will also spend time exploring those things that hamper our ability to find God in all things. Our goal is to become "contemplatives in action," people who are alert to God's presence in all of our experiences - even  those that are difficult or painful for us. For more information and to register, please visit the event page.


 


Catholic Conversations

 


News & Announcements
from the Archdiocese of Minneapolis & St. Paul


STAY WITH ME, REMAIN HERE WITH ME:

A Lenten Online Interactive Retreat on Prayer for Women,

March 6 - April 20

Take time to deepen your relationship with God this Lenten season using online reflection materials provided by Sr. Sandra Weinke, SSND.  Deepen your personal reflection and prayer by meeting weekly, by Skype, phone or in-person, with a School Sister of Notre Dame as a spiritual companion.  Register by March 4th at https://ssnd.org/events/online-lenten-retreat/ or contact Sr. Stephanie Spandl at sspandl@ssnd.org or 651-278-4498.


Operation Andrew

Thursday, March 7
6 - 8 p.m. 
Archdiocesan Catholic Center, St. Paul

Archbishop Bernard Hebda and Father David Blume, Director of Vocations, invite men discerning the priesthood, ages 16 - 50, to dinner and conversation with vocations testimonials on priesthood and religious life. It is typical for a pastor, religious or youth minister to accompany each discerning guest. 

Register online before March 4. Email stpaulvocations@10000vocations.org or call the Office of Vocations at 651-962-6890.


Miriam Dinner

Tuesday, March 12
6 - 8 p.m.
Archdiocesan Catholic Center, St. Paul

The Miriam Dinner, hosted by Archbishop Bernard Hebda and Father David Blume, Director of Vocations, is an event for women, ages 16 - 35, who are discerning consecrated life. It is typical for women discerners to be accompanied by their pastor, consecrated religious, or youth minister. The evening begins with prayer, followed by dinner with consecrated women sharing their vocations testimonies.   Priests, deacons and consecrated women in the Archdiocese are encouraged to invite women, ages 16 - 35, who present a sincere interest in consecrated life. The evening will begin at 6 p.m. with Evening Prayer at Holy Cross Catholic Church, followed by dinner in Kolbe Hall, and conclude with a tour of Bethany House (Women's Discernment House) with dessert and coffee.

Register onlinebefore March 8.  Email stpaulvocations@10000vocations.org