Jenne Westberry portrait

Jenne Westberry

Visiting Professor
Degree
Ph.D., Florida State University
Office
367 Owens Hall
Phone
651-962-5245
Toll Free
(800)328-6819, Ext. 2-5245
Fax
(651)962-5201
Mail
OWS 367
2115 Summit Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105

Professional Interests

  • Sensory physiology and brain circuits involved in olfactory communication, studied by molecular, anatomical and behavioral methods.
  • Sex differences in a variety of brain functions and social behaviors.
  • Epigenetic regulation of Estrogen Receptors across the lifespan.

 

Representative Publications

  • Westberry JM and Meredith M (2016) Characteristic Response to Chemosensory Signals in GABAergic Cells of Medial Amygdala Is Not Driven by Main Olfactory Input. Chem Senses. pii: bjw096. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Westberry JM and Meredith M (2016) GABAergic mechanisms contributing to categorical amygdala responses to chemosensory signals. Neuroscience Sep 7;331:186-96. doi: 10.1016. Epub 2016 Jun 18.
  • Westberry JM and Wilson ME (2012) Regulation of ER alpha gene expression in the mouse prefrontal cortex during early postnatal development. Neurogenetics 3(2): 159-167.
  • Westberry JM, Trout AL, and Wilson ME (2011) Epigenetic regulation of estrogen receptor beta expression during aging. Neuroreport 22(9): 428-432.
  • Westberry JM, Trout AL, and Wilson ME (2010) Epigenetic regulation of ER alpha gene expression in the mouse cortex during early postnatal development. Endocrinology 151(2): 731-740.
  • Westberry JM, Prewitt AK and Wilson ME (2008) Epigenetic regulation of the estrogen receptor alpha promoter in the cerebral cortex following ischemia. Neuroscience 152: 982-989.
  • Meredith M and Westberry JM (2004) Distinctive responses in medial amygdala to same-and different species pheromones. The Journal of Neuroscience 24: 5719-5725.

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 398 - 01 Neuroscience and Epigenetics M - W - - - - 1200 - 1600 OWS 250

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1200 - 1600

Location:

OWS 250

Course Registration Number:

30180 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Jenne M. Westberry

Humans share a large percent of our genes with Chimpanzees. Thus far, the number of genes that differ are not enough to describe what makes us human and them apes. In the past two decades, scientists embarked on exciting new research and discovered that the mechanisms that regulate how genes are expressed is much more complicated than our DNA alone. Sections of our DNA are constantly being turned on or off, all in response to on-going cellular activity. These on/off switches may function to mark some DNA as important and easily accessible or dormant and hidden. In the brain, neurons encode or memories and experiences over a lifetime, but neurons and cellular function are, to some extent dynamic. The major questions involve how memories and experiences can persist beyond the lifetimes of synapses and proteins? Epigenetics – changes in gene expression that do not alter the underlying DNA sequence – may be the answer. In this course, we explore the most current research pertaining to epigenetic mechanisms. These mechanisms include DNA methylation and acetylation or methylation of the histone proteins that package DNA are described in the context of animal learning. We will explore how DNA modification may in fact provide a “histone code”. We will specifically focus on understanding of the mechanisms involved with memory disorders caused by normal aging or diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, depression, and drug addiction. There will be no textbook for this course. Student will be expected to read and interpret primary literature and be able to present and discuss the information with the class.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
NSCI 398 - 01 Neuroscience and Epigenetics M - W - - - - 1200 - 1600 OWS 250

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1200 - 1600

Location:

OWS 250

Course Registration Number:

30523 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Jenne M. Westberry

Humans share a large percent of our genes with Chimpanzees. Thus far, the number of genes that differ are not enough to describe what makes us human and them apes. In the past two decades, scientists embarked on exciting new research and discovered that the mechanisms that regulate how genes are expressed is much more complicated than our DNA alone. Sections of our DNA are constantly being turned on or off, all in response to on-going cellular activity. These on/off switches may function to mark some DNA as important and easily accessible or dormant and hidden. In the brain, neurons encode or memories and experiences over a lifetime, but neurons and cellular function are, to some extent dynamic. The major questions involve how memories and experiences can persist beyond the lifetimes of synapses and proteins? Epigenetics – changes in gene expression that do not alter the underlying DNA sequence – may be the answer. In this course, we explore the most current research pertaining to epigenetic mechanisms. These mechanisms include DNA methylation and acetylation or methylation of the histone proteins that package DNA are described in the context of animal learning. We will explore how DNA modification may in fact provide a “histone code”. We will specifically focus on understanding of the mechanisms involved with memory disorders caused by normal aging or diseases including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s, depression, and drug addiction. There will be no textbook for this course. Student will be expected to read and interpret primary literature and be able to present and discuss the information with the class.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
NSCI 450 - 01 Integrative Neuroscience - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 257

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OWS 257

Course Registration Number:

42725 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Jenne M. Westberry

If we are to understand how behavior is guided by environmental cues, we must first understand how sensory information about the world is represented and processed in brain. In this seminar-style course, we will examine the neural organization of sensory systems, particularly the organization of cortical structures. We will first explore how various organizational strategies are used in different systems to perform specific functions, leading to the focus of our course: how information from different sensory modalities is integrated in higher-order cortical areas, and how this integration ultimately influences behavior. Prerequisite: C- or better in any two neuroscience elective courses or permission of the instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
NSCI 450 - 51 Integrative Neuroscience M - - - - - - 1200 - 1600 OWS 379

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1200 - 1600

Location:

OWS 379

Course Registration Number:

42726 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Jenne M. Westberry

If we are to understand how behavior is guided by environmental cues, we must first understand how sensory information about the world is represented and processed in brain. In this seminar-style course, we will examine the neural organization of sensory systems, particularly the organization of cortical structures. We will first explore how various organizational strategies are used in different systems to perform specific functions, leading to the focus of our course: how information from different sensory modalities is integrated in higher-order cortical areas, and how this integration ultimately influences behavior. Prerequisite: C- or better in any two neuroscience elective courses or permission of the instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location