640X385

NOTE: Independent studies, courses from other ACTC schools, study abroad courses, and up to two 100-level courses may be applied toward the minor with the approval of the program director, Dr. Kanishka Chowdhury (k9chowdhury@stthomas.edu).

J-Term 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - L01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

20003 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

20615 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dina Gavrilos

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 340 - D01 Television Criticism - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

20826 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kevin O. Sauter

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 465 - D01 Capstone: N. Amer. Borderlands M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

21454 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael A. Blaakman

This capstone seminar examines North American borderlands from the colonial period to the mid-nineteenth century. We will explore how Native Americans and European newcomers interacted with, influenced, and exerted power over each other in contested frontier regions, focusing on themes such as trade, cultural exchange, diplomacy, warfare, empire, revolution, dispossession, and resistance. Students will gain an in-depth knowledge of borderlands history and historiography, and will spend the semester crafting a major term paper that addresses a question of their own devising, based on original primary-source research.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 251 - 01 Race and Ethnicity M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 208

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

20616 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies and fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

30435 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Matthew B. Harrison

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This fully online course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

American Culture & Difference
J-Term and Spring Additional Approved Courses

J-Term 2018

ENGL 217-L01 Multicultural Literature
T/R 9:00am-12:00pm + Online Component
Prof. Melissa Hendrickx
What happens when race and sexuality collide? This course will explore literature from writers of color who are also members of the LGBTQ community. We will discuss the impact of having multiple minority statuses, and historic connections between racial and LGBTQ social justice movements. Potential authors include James Baldwin, Audre Lorde, Benjamin Alire Sáenz, Ryka Aoki, Deborah Miranda, and others. Through their poetry, novels, and essays, we will examine how these writers redefine our understanding of gender, ethnicity, and relationships, while simultaneously expanding the American Literary canon. Students' final project will consist of connecting one of these authors to a current cultural or political issue. This is a blended/hyrbid course that will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays, with students completing online assignments on Wednesdays and Fridays. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum, and counts as a Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn course. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

HIST 113-L01 Early-America in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Anne Osler

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 114-L01 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Meliha Ceric

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

THEO 457-01 Theology and Public Discourse
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Marguerite Spencer
OR
THEO 457-02 Theology and Public Discourse
T/W/R/F 1:00-4:00pm
Prof. Marguerite Spencer

This course addresses students as citizen believers, mapping out what role they can play in public life. It first examine the Christian tradition and its teachings on responsible citizenship. It then examines the question using legal and political theory from before our founding as a nation through the debates about the nature of our democracy today. The rest of the course is focused on preparing students as citizen believers to enter the public square with their own theological argument on a contemporary political topic of interest to them, which will make public through varied written formats and class debate. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115.


Spring 2018

COJO 376-01 Argumentation and Advocacy
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Bernard Armada

This course provides an introduction to practical reasoning in public controversy. Students will apply argumentation theories and methods to the analysis of public controversy and the development of their own oral advocacy skills. Topics include: Tests of evidence, invention, reasoning, oral presentation or arguments. Activities may include: Lecture, discussion, examinations, analysis papers, speaking assignments, small group discussion and presentation. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor permission.

ENGL 202-W03 Sports and Social Justice (Prof. Dan Jones)
ENGL 202-W04 Sports and Social Justice (Prof. Liz Wilkinson)
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm

Why did two men walk, shoeless, to the medal podium at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City and raise black-gloved fists during the playing of the U.S. national anthem? Who stood beside them in solidarity? Why does a poem about the first Olympic gold medalist in Women’s Marathon in 1984 end with the line, “and standing”? What basketball team was declared World Champion following the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904? These and other questions highlight the convergence of sport, culture, and social justice, an intersection that is embedded in our history and lauded in our literature. In this class, we will investigate the literature of sport and social justice via interdisciplinary perspectives. Sport provides a lens through which we can see the values of America more clearly. It can show us the best we have to offer . . . and sometimes, unfortunately, the worst. We will consider it all, focusing on the ways that sport has become an arena for politics, culture, and social justice. To accomplish this we will read the work of sports writers, essayists, poets, novelists and playwrights, but we will also engage productions of contemporary culture such as photographic images, social media, videos, and memes. Through all of these we will seek to consider sport not as an apolitical pastime, but as a complex and fraught landscape where the issues and problems that our country grapples with are present in numerous and fascinating ways. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 202-W05 Sports and Social Justice (Prof. Todd Lawrence)
ENGL 202-W06 Sports and Social Justice (Prof. Liz Wilkinson)
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm

Why did two men walk, shoeless, to the medal podium at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City and raise black-gloved fists during the playing of the U.S. national anthem? Who stood beside them in solidarity? Why does a poem about the first Olympic gold medalist in Women’s Marathon in 1984 end with the line, “and standing”? What basketball team was declared World Champion following the St. Louis World’s Fair in 1904? These and other questions highlight the convergence of sport, culture, and social justice, an intersection that is embedded in our history and lauded in our literature. In this class, we will investigate the literature of sport and social justice via interdisciplinary perspectives. Sport provides a lens through which we can see the values of America more clearly. It can show us the best we have to offer . . . and sometimes, unfortunately, the worst. We will consider it all, focusing on the ways that sport has become an arena for politics, culture, and social justice. To accomplish this we will read the work of sports writers, essayists, poets, novelists and playwrights, but we will also engage productions of contemporary culture such as photographic images, social media, videos, and memes. Through all of these we will seek to consider sport not as an apolitical pastime, but as a complex and fraught landscape where the issues and problems that our country grapples with are present in numerous and fascinating ways. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 202-W09 At the Crossroads of the Blues
T/R 9:55-11:35
Prof. Andrew Scheiber
Though born of necessity as a response to racial oppression and the legacy of slavery, the music we call “the blues” has traveled far—across time, geography, racial boundaries, and even beyond its original musical forms. In this class we’ll look at some of the crossings and intersections that the blues have travelled through. We’ll see how the blues are not just a form of music, but also a way of making art more generally, and a way of understanding the human condition. This course does not assume any prior musical knowledge, but welcomes anyone who is ready to read, listen, and reflect on the often challenging, disturbing, but ultimately life-affirming messages of the blues. Readings will include Zora Neale Hurston’s THEIR EYES WERE WATCHING GOD, August Wilson’s MA RAINEY'S BLACK BOTTOM, and blues-themed poems by authors from the African American and other literary traditions. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 203-W11 Beyonce’s “Lemonade” Library
M/W 5:30-7:15pm
Prof. Laura Zebuhr
Inspired by Candice Benbow's "Lemonade Syllabus," (2016) this course puts Knowles' visual album into a literary historical context by considering it alongside novels, poems, and autobiographical writing from the 18th c. to today, as well as 20th and 21st c. Black feminist thought. We will also examine how the album uses intertextuality by looking at some of its literary and cultural allusions. Required reading includes: Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God and Assata Shakur's autobiography, Assata. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised pages. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 203-W16 American Idealism
R 3:25-5:00 + Online Component
Prof. Lucy Saliger

In this course, we will read stories, essays, and poetry depicting the efforts of their respective authors or fictional protagonists to "rise" in their societies - individually, collectively, or both. Our focus will be on education as an integral facet of these ascension narratives - formal education as well as other formative kinds of learning. Our efforts over the duration of the semester will help us examine the role of education as a means of uplift in our own lives as well as our broader society. We will explore questions regarding success and failure in these endeavors along with inescapable contradictions in these stories while reflecting on how and why they work on many of us so powerfully. Authors may include Frederick Douglass, Zitkala-Sa, Jack Conroy, Anne Moody, Jimmy Baca, and Francisco Jimenez. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement. NOTE: This is a hybrid course that is scheduled to meet weekly on Thursdays from 3:25-5:00pm; during some days or weeks of the semester, we will meet online during regular class time or work and meet online according to our own individual schedules while keeping up with course work and class discussions. The instructor will be traveling during part of the semester, interviewing people living through various stages in their own educational ascension narratives and inviting them to speak with her and the class via Skype. By the end of the semester, the hope is that students will gain deeper insight into their own ideals regarding education and its place in our lives.

ENGL 204-W01 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Language
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Lucia Pawlowski
OR
ENGL 203-W02 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Language
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm
Prof. Lucia Pawlowski

Do men and women speak differently? Do gay men still find a need to “code” their language? How do lesbians resist the negative connotations of “coming out?” Why do we need a word for “cis?” How does African-American Vernacular English have roots in West African languages? How is hip hop part of the African-American oral tradition? Why would a Chicana writer “code-mesh” (write in both English and Spanish) in her writing? Why would English be resisted if it’s a “global” language? How did Native American boarding schools threaten Native American languages? We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variations of various minority groups: women, African-Americans, gay men, lesbians, Latinas, and Native Americans in colloquial and literary speech, and examine the power negotiations involved in these variations. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 371-L01 A Century of “Unruly” Women
M/W 1:35-3:10pm
Prof. Andrew Scheiber

Nineteenth Century America was dominated by a gender ideology of “separate spheres,” in which large public questions—politics, business, national identity—were largely seen as the realm of the male and women were relegated to the “domestic” spheres of home, family, and unpaid charitable work. The literature of this period tells a different story, however; the genre of literary fiction was dominated by best-selling female writers who confronted the barriers to women’s full participation in the life of the nation in ways that were by turns direct and cleverly subversive. Even male writers of the period created vivid, powerful female protagonists who registered men’s anxiety about, and admiration of, the insurgent female moral and creative energies of the era. In this course we’ll read a generous selection of writings (mainly by women, but a few by men as well) that exemplify in literary form the challenges to the prevailing gender norms of the time, most significantly in the areas of politics, economics, and literary production. Likely titles to be examined include Catharine Sedgwick’s HOPE LESLIE, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s BLITHEDALE ROMANCE, and Kate Chopin’s THE AWAKENING, among others Likely Students will write a series of short reflection papers, one research report, and an extended final essay on a selected author or work from the course readings.

HIST 113-L01 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Anne Osler]
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
OR
HIST 113-L02 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Anne Osler]
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm
OR
HIST 113-W03 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Michael Blaakman]
M/W/F 1:35-2:40pm
OR
HIST 113-W04 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Michael Blaakman]
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 114-02 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. George Woytanowitz]
T/R 8:00-9:40am
OR
HIST 114-04 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Max Forrester]
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
OR
HIST 114-05 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Max Forrester]
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
OR
HIST 114-L03 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Meliha Ceric]
M/W/F 8:15-9:20am
OR
HIST 114-W41 HONORS Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. David Williard]
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 298-02 Topics: The Long Emancipation, 1800-1920
M/W/F 9:35-10:40am
Prof. David Williard

This course examines the relationship between slavery and freedom for African Americans from the consolidation of the early American republic to the height of Jim Crow.  It devotes equal weight to the political and economic structures that linked race to citizenship and to the experiences of African Americans who lived, worked, resisted, and endured that regime.  Students will gain familiarity with various kinds of historical evidence and with enduring scholarly questions as they explore the fundamental question "what does it mean to be free in the United States?"

HIST 298-03 Latin American Urban History, 1800-2000
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Kari Zimmerman

What were the causes and consequences of urban development in Latin America? Two of the ten largest cities in the world are located in Latin America and this course considers the history of urbanization in the region as both an official project and a lived experience. Beginning with the colonial city that served as a political and religious center, the course explores the evolution of the Latin American city through nation-state formation, twentieth-century modernization projects, and up to contemporary megacities. Major themes such as market development, class conflict, labor and workers’ movements, migrations, gendered spaces, public health and social control, built environments, and urban culture are considered in a comparative framework.

HIST 366-01 History of the American Catholic Church
T/R 8:00-9:40am
Prof. Anne Klejment

Analysis of the American Catholic church from the mission era through the post Vatican II period, with emphasis on the diverse populations who have comprised the American Catholic church throughout its history. The focus of the course examines the changing relationship between Catholics, their church, and American society. Topics analyzed include anti-Catholicism and nativism; slavery and other forms of racial and ethnic injustice; economic justice and peace; ethnic and gendered spiritualities; the nature of the pre-Vatican II and post-Vatican II Catholic church. Extensive use of sources generated by American Catholics of color emphasize the rich thought and religious experiences of Catholics from diverse backgrounds. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course.

IDSC 291-01 Anatomy of Violence
Tuesdays 6:00-9:15pm
Prof. Paul Schnell
The purpose of this course is to increase the knowledge and understanding of cultural, racial and
interpersonal violence and develop a commitment to promoting a violence-free society. Emphasis is on exploration of the extent, causes and effects of violence and strategies for intervention on the micro and macro levels. Specific areas of study include domestic/partner abuse, child abuse/neglect, peer/date violence, elder abuse, sexual assault/sexual harassment, cultural violence, racism and other systemic oppression. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. 

JPST 280-01 Active Nonviolence
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer
Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

JPST 355-D01 Public Policy Analysis & Advocacy
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer

In this class students will investigate how and why particular policies are developed, proposed, adopted, and implemented; will explore how social values shape and impact public policies; and will learn how to frame issues in ways that allow for more effective advocacy. The class will examine the relative power of diverse corporate and non-profit sectors in influencing policy debates and outcomes, including the role of think tanks. Students will analyze the limitations and strengths of diverse approaches to advocacy ranging from third-party appeals and solidarity efforts to elite decision makers, as well as the prospects for a politics of agency rooted in citizen-centered politics in which people mobilize to meet the needs of their communities. The course will integrate basic theory, interaction with public policy analysts and advocates, personal experience in persuasive advocacy, and case studies focused on issues such as climate change, economic inequality, land-food-hunger, and approaches to health care. Assignments will introduce students to various tools for persuasive advocacy and allow them to develop skill sets for using them. 

JPST 375-D01 Conflict Analysis and Transformation
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Amy Finnegan

An introduction to issues surrounding conflict and the resolution of conflict in today's world focusing primarily on its contextual manifestation at the international, regional and intrastate levels. The course will explore important structural, social and psychological explanations of conflict. Attention will be given to ethnic and nationalist themes surrounding conflicts and their resolution at the intrastate and international levels. The course will examine how different types of intervention affect conflicts (the media, force, other types of third party intervention). Effective methods that foster an environment conducive to resolving or managing disputes will be studied. As part of the final task, the course will critically study how institutions such as power-sharing arrangements, federalism, and the rule of law figure into establishing a lasting basis for peaceful co-existence. For Justice and Peace Studies majors doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, the course will complement JPST 370 Conflict Mediation, but there are no prerequisites and the course is open to students in other majors. 

MUSC 133-L01 Music of the U.S.: Aural and Written
Thursday 8:00-9:40am
Prof. Sarah Schmalenberger
This course focuses on the study of U.S. music within its cultural context. The course, with its emphasis on listening analysis, and vocabulary development will contain 1) music of aural traditions to include jazz, popular, and ethnic music and 2) music of written traditions to include art music and jazz. Prerequisite: Music majors or permission of instructor. Please note that this is a 2-credit course.

MUSC 162-01 Roots of Blues, Rock, Country
M/W 1:35-3:10pm
Prof. Bruce Gleason

This course traces the development of American popular music from its roots through multiple genres such as minstrelsy, jazz, big band, swing, crooning, jump blues, gospel, rhythm and blues, country, western, folk/protest, and rock 'n' roll, concluding with the British Invasion. Popular music development is critically examined through four interrelated driving forces: identity (ethnicity, gender, culture, generation), centers vs. peripheries (the established vs. the innovative), technology (impact on musical performance and listening), and business/law (commercial competition and development). Multimedia presentations include extensive audio and video support. Designed for the Popular Music minor, this course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. 

POLS 205-L01 Citizen Participation & Public Policy
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Timothy Lynch
This course focuses on American politics and public policy, with an emphasis on what both citizens and governments do, why they do it, and what difference it makes. It examines aspects of the policy process, such as agenda-setting and issue attention cycles, before covering substantive public policy issues such as education, civil rights, health care, energy and the environment, defense, and immigration. The ways in which citizens influence the public policy process through elections, interest groups, and measures of public opinion will also be considered. Prerequisite: POLS 104 or permission of instructor. 

POLS 301-W01 Political Identity & Participation
W 5:30-9:15pm
Prof. Angela High-Pippert

This course focuses on how and why people participate in politics in the United States, with an emphasis on how intersecting identities of citizens affect measures of political behavior, including partisanship, voting, and other forms of political involvement. Relevant identities include those rooted in race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and religion. Prerequisite: POLS 205 or permission of the instructor.

POLS 313-W01 Constitutional Powers of Government
M/W/F 1:35-2:40pm
Prof. Steven Maloney

This course uses Supreme Court decisions primarily involving the first three articles of the Constitution to learn about the powers of both the federal and state governments in the United States. Questions of power, authority, and legitimacy are addressed throughout the course, both with respect to individual branches of government as well as interactions between the branches. Prerequisite: POLS 104 or permission of the instructor. Junior or senior standing strongly recommended.

POLS 404-D01 Seminar in American Politics
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Timothy Lynch

Seminars in political science provide an opportunity for students to synthesize and further develop knowledge gained in previous courses and enhance their critical and analytical skills. Students will engage in reading and discussion and undertake a major research project pertinent to the seminar's topic. Specific topics or themes of each seminar will vary. Seminars are offered in each of the sub-fields of the discipline. Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors may enroll in a seminar once they have completed at 300-level course within that subfield, or with permission of the instructor.

SOCI 346-01 Corrections in America       
T 5:40-9:15pm
Valerie Clark
This course takes a sociological approach in examining the role of corrections in the criminal justice system focusing on the rationales for punishing offenders, the range of correctional placements, and the effectiveness of correctional policies in achieving social control. Topics include correctional treatment practices, mass incarceration, reentry, restorative justice, and ethical decision making in corrections. Prerequisites: SOCI 100 and SOCI 200.

SOCI 350-W01 Social Inequality: Privilege and Power
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Jacquelynn Austin

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or SOCI 110 and Junior standing.

THEO 432-01 Black Religious Experience
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Ry Siggelkow
This course explore Black theological development as a cultural, functional and cognitive dimension of traditional Afro-American society, including belief, worship, expression, symbol, spirituality and God. Attention will be given to the meaning and roots of the notions of culture, nationalism and racism as they appear as questions in Black theological though, including African religions, Islam and The Nation of Islam, along with Afro-American Christian theologies. African as well as Afro-American religious experience combined with the affirmation of the Christian creed are identified in order to evaluate the questions of Black Catholic theology in America today. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115.