640X385

NOTE: Independent studies, courses from other ACTC schools, study abroad courses, and up to two 100-level courses may be applied toward the minor with the approval of the program director, Dr. Kanishka Chowdhury (k9chowdhury@stthomas.edu).

Fall 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - L01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

41935 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. and satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 326 - W01 Communication in Pop Culture - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

41486 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada

This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference. This course fulfills the Human Diversity Core requirement Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 BEC 113

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

40522 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 216 - L01 Jazz in America - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 BEC 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

40177 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bruce P. Gleason

The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
POLS 301 - 01 Pol. Identity & Participation - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 BEC 105

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BEC 105

Course Registration Number:

42664 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Timothy P. Collins

This course focuses on how and why people participate in politics in the United States, with an emphasis on how intersecting identities of citizens affect measures of political behavior, including partisanship, voting, and other forms of political involvement. Relevant identities include those rooted in race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation, and religion. Prerequisite: POLS 205 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 251 - 01 Race and Ethnicity M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 203

Course Registration Number:

40245 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies and fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 332 - L01 Latin Amer Cult & Civil - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 326

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

SCB 326

Course Registration Number:

41752 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paola B. Ehrmantraut

Physical and human geography. History of Latin America from pre-Hispanic civilizations through modern times. Political problems. Rural Latin America. Latin American society, cultural values. Religion. Economic problems. Offered in spring semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THTR 223 - L01 History of American Theater - - - - - - - -

Days of Week:

- - - - - - -

Time of Day:

-

Location:

Course Registration Number:

10280 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shanan M. Custer

This fully online course focuses on the development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama and an emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course fulfills both the Fine Arts requirement and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum and satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Spring 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - L01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 246

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 246

Course Registration Number:

20002 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 284 - L01 Arts of the African Diaspora M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 203

Course Registration Number:

22389 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy M. Mickelson

This course surveys the diverse arts produced by people of African descent in the Diaspora (Suriname, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, the United States and England) from the Colonial period to the present. An examination of selected West and Central African cultural practices and art forms will serve as a basis for an understanding of creative transformations in the African Diaspora. Important issues to be addressed include art and resistance, survivals and transformations, and the construction of race and diasporic identity. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

20522 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

21955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. It also satisfies an allied requirement for select business majors, satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started that core requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, and satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 216 - W01 Jazz in America - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

21866 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Kachian

The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THTR 223 - L01 History of American Theater M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

21951 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shanan M. Custer

This course focuses on the development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama and an emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course fulfills both the Fine Arts requirement and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum and satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THTR 223 - L02 History of American Theater - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

21950 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

JoAnn M. Holonbek

This course focuses on the development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama and an emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course fulfills both the Fine Arts requirement and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum and satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

American Culture & Difference
   J-Term/Spring 2020 Additional Approved Courses

J-Term 2020

ENGL 217-L01 Multicultural Literature
Fully Online
Prof. Melissa Hendrickx-Solberg
What happens when race and sexuality collide? This fully online course will emphasize intersectionality through literature from writers of color who are also members of the LGBTQ+ community. We will discuss the impact of having multiple minority statuses, and historic (dis)connections between racial and LGBTQ+ social justice movements. Through poetry, novels, and essays, we will examine how LGBTQ+ writers of color redefine our understanding of identity, language, and relationships, while simultaneously expanding the American Literary canon. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for those students that started with an ENGL 201-204 class, satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement, the Diversity requirement for English majors, an allied requirement for select business majors, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

HIST 113-L01 Early-America in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Anne Osler
Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 114-L01 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Meliha Ceric
Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Spring 2020

ARTH 251-L01 Museum Studies: Practices
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Vanessa Rousseau

This course provides an investigation of the critical issues facing museums in the 21st century. Museum missions, practices, and resources will be interwoven with a discussion of audience, communication, and collaboration. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester. This course fulfills the WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

COJO 342-D01 Media, Culture and Society
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Pamela Hill Nettleton

Media, Culture and Society examines the role media play in social and cultural formations. This course looks beyond the media as transmitters of information to their broadest social and cultural effects. Students study media as agents of enlightened social modernism, as political and economic institutions, as purveyors of popular culture, and as aspects of cultural and sub-cultural rituals. History, political economy, critical studies, cultural anthropology, semiotics and sociology are among the areas from which approaches for studying the media are considered in the course. This course satisfies a WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 201-W02 Jazz Music & American Poetry
M/W/F 8:15-9:20am
Prof. Lucas Pingel

This course will explore poetry's intersection with jazz music, and the uniquely American brand of poetry that results. Students will become familiarized with some of the rich history of jazz as a music of innovation and of protest, and learn about some of the most significant musicians (John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Charles Mingues, for example) to inspire poets to move beyond typical conventions in literature. This course will maintain a foundation in developing strong reading, writing, and analytical skills through a variety of written assignments about authors such as Langston Hughes, Frank O'Hara, Bob Kaufman and Sonia Sanchez. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 202-W02 Business & American Identity
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Dan Jones
This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and American culture. Work has always been an integral part of American society, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, Solomon Northup’s 12 YEARS A SLAVE, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s THE GREAT GATSBY, Mario Puzo’s THE GODFATHER, Arthur Miller’s DEATH OF A SALESMAN, and Colson Whitehead’s APEX HIDES THE HURT--to explore how the dominant cultural narratives behind common perceptions of American business (such as the American Dream and the self-made person) shift from the pre-Civil War era through the early twenty-first century. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 337-L01 Afrofuturism & Social Justice
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Todd Lawrence
To create just, equitable worlds, we must first imagine them. In this course, we will consider Afrofuturism, a cultural aesthetic that describes the interface between the African diaspora and technology, but we will also explore the powerful potential of the black visionary imagination to reclaim black histories and conjure alternative black futures. Genres closely related to Afrofuturism such as black speculative writing, African futurism, and visionary fiction all engage in a kind of radical imagining which can serve as the foundation for transformative action. Considering these in the course, students will engage the intersection of the black imagination and social change. How can imagining fictive worlds help us to transform the one we currently live in? How can speculative creativity enable possibilities for social justice? Writers, artists, and thinkers will include: Walidah Imarisha, Adriene Marie Brown, Nnedi Okorafor, N.K. Jemison, Octavia Butler, Colson Whitehead, Sun Ra, Wangechi Mutu, and Samuel Delany among others. This course satisfies both the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and the core Human Diversity requirement. It also satisfies an allied requirement for select business majors, a Diversity Literature distribution requirement for English majors, and the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

HIST 113-L01 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Anne Osler]
M/W/F 1:35-2:40pm
OR
HIST 113-L02 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Max Forrester]
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
OR
HIST 113-L03 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Max Forrester]
T/R 5:30-7:15pm
OR 113-L04 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Anne Osler]
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm
Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum and the WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

HIST 114-01 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [TBD]
T/R 8:00-9:40am
OR
HIST 114-03 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Stephen Hausman]
M/W/F 1:35-2:40pm
OR
HIST 114-04 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Stephen Hausman]
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
OR
HIST 114-L02 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Meliha Ceric]
M/W/F 9:35-10:40am
OR
HIST 114-L05 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Meliha Ceric]
M/W/F 8:15-9:20am
OR
HIST 114-L06 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. Jacob Jurss]
M/W 3:25-5:00pm

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum; “L” sections fulfill the WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

HIST 292-01 Contemporary Native America
M/W/F 9:35-10:40am
Prof. Stephen Hausman

In popular culture and even academic histories, the story of Native North America is too often assumed to have ended with the 1890 Massacre at Wounded Knee. Rather than an ending, this course begins at that pivotal and tragic moment. This course surveys the history of Indigenous people in North America from the end of the nineteenth century to the present and emphasizes methods by which Native communities survived, resisted, and thrived, within the bounds of American colonialism in the modern era. We will address issues and questions such as Native sovereignty, the changing relationship between Native people and the US state, and Native activism in the realms of politics and environmental justice, including the rise of AIM in the mid-twentieth century and the #NODAPL movement in the twenty first.

JPST 280-01 Active Nonviolence
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Mike Klein
Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

JPST 355-D01 Public Policy Analysis & Advocacy
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. TBD
In this class students will investigate how and why particular policies are developed, proposed, adopted, and implemented; will explore how social values shape and impact public policies; and will learn how to frame issues in ways that allow for more effective advocacy. The class will examine the relative power of diverse corporate and non-profit sectors in influencing policy debates and outcomes, including the role of think tanks. Students will analyze the limitations and strengths of diverse approaches to advocacy ranging from third-party appeals and solidarity efforts to elite decision makers, as well as the prospects for a politics of agency rooted in citizen-centered politics in which people mobilize to meet the needs of their communities. The course will integrate basic theory, interaction with public policy analysts and advocates, personal experience in persuasive advocacy, and case studies focused on issues such as climate change, economic inequality, land-food-hunger, and approaches to health care. Assignments will introduce students to various tools for persuasive advocacy and allow them to develop skill sets for using them. This course satisfies the WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement.

MUSC 133-L01 Music of the U.S.: Aural and Written
M 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Sarah Schmalenberger
This course focuses on the study of U.S. music within its cultural context. The course, with its emphasis on listening analysis, and vocabulary development will contain 1) music of aural traditions to include jazz, popular, and ethnic music and 2) music of written traditions to include art music and jazz. Prerequisite: Music majors or permission of instructor. Please note that this is a 2-credit course.

MUSC 162-L01 Roots of Blues, Rock, Country
M/W 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Bruce Gleason

This course traces the development of American popular music from its roots through multiple genres such as minstrelsy, jazz, big band, swing, crooning, jump blues, gospel, rhythm and blues, country, western, folk/protest, and rock 'n' roll, concluding with the British Invasion. Popular music development is critically examined through four interrelated driving forces: identity (ethnicity, gender, culture, generation), centers vs. peripheries (the established vs. the innovative), technology (impact on musical performance and listening), and business/law (commercial competition and development). Multimedia presentations include extensive audio and video support. Designed for the Popular Music minor, this course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum and the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. 

POLS 205-L01 Citizen Participation & Public Policy
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Timothy Collins
This course focuses on American politics and public policy, with an emphasis on what both citizens and governments do, why they do it, and what difference it makes. It examines aspects of the policy process, such as agenda-setting and issue attention cycles, before covering substantive public policy issues such as education, civil rights, health care, energy and the environment, defense, and immigration. The ways in which citizens influence the public policy process through elections, interest groups, and measures of public opinion will also be considered. This course satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: POLS 104 or permission of instructor. 

POLS 404-D01 Seminar in American Politics
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Timothy Lynch

Seminars in political science provide an opportunity for students to synthesize and further develop knowledge gained in previous courses and enhance their critical and analytical skills. Students will engage in reading and discussion and undertake a major research project pertinent to the seminar's topic. Specific topics or themes of each seminar will vary. Seminars are offered in each of the sub-fields of the discipline. This course satisfies the WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement. Prerequisite: Juniors and seniors may enroll in a seminar once they have completed at 300-level course within that subfield, or with permission of the instructor.

SOCI 350-W01 Social Inequality: Privilege and Power
M/W/F 8:15-9:20am
Prof. Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. The course counts toward the WAC Writing Intensive requirement. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or SOCI 110 and Junior standing.

SPAN 489-D01 Mujeras en zona de conflicto
T/R 5:30-7:15pm (blended)
Prof. Paula Ehrmantraut

This course will explore the multiple roles Latin-American women have played in recent history when confronted with political and social conflict. In the last 130 years, women have been soldiers, activists, community organizers, witnesses and displaced citizens forced into exile. Who are the women behind these inspiring stories of hope and courage? We will approach their experiences through the prism of several disciplines and we will build a theoretical framework that will allow us to enter into broader discussions about global feminism, activism and human rights beyond the geographical borders of Latin America. This course satisfies the WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement.

THEO 432-01 Black Religious Experience
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Richard Cowgill
This course will explore Black theological development as a cultural, functional and cognitive dimension of traditional Afro-American society, including belief, worship, expression, symbol, spirituality and God. Attention will be given to the meaning and roots of the notions of culture, nationalism and racism as they appear as questions in Black theological though, including African religions, Islam and The Nation of Islam, along with Afro-American Christian theologies. African as well as Afro-American religious experience combined with the affirmation of the Christian creed are identified in order to evaluate the questions of Black Catholic theology in America today. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115.

THEO 460-01 Christian Ethics & U.S. Immigration
M 5:30-9:15pm
Prof. Ry Siggelkow

This course will bring the tools and the methods of Christian ethics to bear on the issues of economic immigration in the contemporary, U.S. context. The first part of the course examines the economic, political, historical, social and cultural dimensions of transnational migration in the U.S. context. The second part of the course will bring the resources of Christian ethics to the ethical issues of immigration raised in the first part of the course. This second part of the course will examine the centrality of alterity (otherness) in the Bible and the Christian tradition. The course will conclude with the discussion of how Christian ethics can inform the national discourse on these issues and conversely, how the issues of migration must shape Christian ethics. This course will have a service learning component that will bring students into contact with immigrant communities in the Twin Cities. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

 

 

ENGL 217-L01 Multicultural Literature
Fully Online
Prof. Melissa Hendrickx-Solberg
What happens when race and sexuality collide? This fully online course will emphasize intersectionality through literature from writers of color who are also members of the LGBTQ+ community. We will discuss the impact of having multiple minority statuses, and historic (dis)connections between racial and LGBTQ+ social justice movements. Through poetry, novels, and essays, we will examine how LGBTQ+ writers of color redefine our understanding of identity, language, and relationships, while simultaneously expanding the American Literary canon. This course satisfies the core Literature and Writing requirement for those students that started with an ENGL 201-204 class, satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement, the Diversity requirement for English majors, an allied requirement for select business majors, and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

HIST 113-L01 Early-America in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Anne Osler

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 114-L01 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Meliha Ceric

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

THTR 223-L01 History of American Theater
Fully Online
Prof. Shanan Custer
This fully online course focuses on the development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama and an emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course fulfills both the Fine Arts requirement and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum and satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.