640X385

NOTE: Independent studies, courses from other ACTC schools, study abroad courses, and up to two 100-level courses may be applied toward the minor with the approval of the program director, Dr. Kanishka Chowdhury (k9chowdhury@stthomas.edu).

Fall 2018 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - L01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

42458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 326 - W01 Communication in Pop Culture - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

41696 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada

This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference. This course fulfills the Human Diversity Core requirement Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 BEC 113

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

40614 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 216 - 01 Jazz in America - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 BEC 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

40238 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Kachian

The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 251 - 01 Race and Ethnicity M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

40312 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies and fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 332 - L01 Latin Amer Cult & Civil - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 317

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 317

Course Registration Number:

42122 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paola B. Ehrmantraut

Physical and human geography. History of Latin America from pre-Hispanic civilizations through modern times. Political problems. Rural Latin America. Latin American society, cultural values. Religion. Economic problems. Offered in spring semester. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THTR 223 - L01 History of American Theater See Details * *

Days of Week:

See Details

Time of Day:

*

Location:

*

Course Registration Number:

10309 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Shanan M. Custer

From its ideological origins in the 17th century to its current struggle to represent the diversity of its communities, American Theater is an art that is in constant dialogue with the culture surrounding it. Early American drama, in its character tropes and styles, will serve as a backdrop to exploring the impact of contemporary subversive female voices like Suzan-Lori Parks or the far-reaching effects of a phenomenon like HAMILTON: AN AMERICAN MUSICAL on the landscape of American drama and theater. This blended/hybrid course (1/2 in-seat and 1/2 online) fulfills both the Fine Arts requirement and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.It also satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BEC LL071800-2100- T - R - - -
-- - - - - - -

Spring 2019 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - L01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

20003 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

20556 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 340 - D01 Television Criticism - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 307

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 307

Course Registration Number:

20754 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kevin O. Sauter

This course will provide students with the opportunity to understand television as a text situation in a cultural context. It will examine television from a critical perspective, review a wide variety of program genres and incorporate several theoretical orientations to the qualitative analysis of TV. Students, along with reading about and discussion of critical perspectives, watch programs such as comedies, dramas, news, advertisements, miniseries, etc., and write several critical analyses of the programs.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC LL07

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

BEC LL07

Course Registration Number:

21942 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Andrew J. Scheiber

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 216 - L01 Jazz in America M - W - - - - 1525 - 1655 BEC 110

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1655

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

22642 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Steven R. Finckle

The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

American Culture & Difference
J-Term and Spring 2019 Additional Approved Courses

J-Term 2019

ENGL 217-L01 Multicultural Literature
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Dr. Kelli Larson
What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

HIST 113-L01 Early-America in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Anne Osler

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 114-L01 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective
T/W/R/F 9:00am-12:00pm
Prof. Meliha Ceric

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

 

Spring 2019

ARTH 251-L01 Museum Studies: Practices
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Jayme Yahr

This course provides an investigation of the critical issues facing museums in the 21st century. Museum missions, practices, and resources will be interwoven with a discussion of audience, communication, and collaboration. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester.

ARTH 282-L01 History of American Architecture
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Victoria Young

A survey of high style and vernacular architecture in the United States from the Native Americans to the present day. Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to: identify the major themes and styles in American architecture; recognize major monuments and their designers; and understand how an American identity was projected in architecture. This includes understanding American architecture and its relationship to corresponding developments in art, landscape, and the urban fabric. Emphasis will be placed on structures in Minnesota and the upper Midwest. This course fulfills the Fine Arts requirement in the core curriculum.

COJO 332-01 Documentary: American Culture
M 6:00-9:30pm
Prof. Luanne Lippold
This course provides an overview of documentary television and film as part of American culture. Class sessions will focus on how to analyze and interpret claims particular documentaries make, while providing a foundation for understanding aesthetic, rhetorical, and political economic conventions that help shape the meaning of each documentary. To this end, this course will center on current theoretical dilemmas and debates in documentary filmmaking, including questions of how to define documentary, what constitutes the ethical treatment of documentary subjects and subject matter, and how documentaries construct and position audiences. We will explore the concepts of reality, truth and authority, through a variety of readings and viewings.

COJO 342-D01 Media, Culture and Society
M/W 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Pamela Nettleton

Media, Culture and Society examines the role media play in social and cultural formations. This course looks beyond the media as transmitters of information to their broadest social and cultural effects. Students study media as agents of enlightened social modernism, as political and economic institutions, as purveyors of popular culture, and as aspects of cultural and sub-cultural rituals. History, political economy, critical studies, cultural anthropology, semiotics and sociology are among the areas from which approaches for studying the media are considered in the course. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

ENGL 202-W03 Blues, Lose, Choose [Prof. Andrew Scheiber]
M/W/F 9:35-10:40am
OR
ENGL 202-W05 Blues, Lose, Choose [Prof. Andrew Scheiber]
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm

The music we call the blues was invented, Ralph Ellison once wrote, by a group of people struggling with the question of how to live without power, and how to exert their will in circumstances that offered no good choices. This is true not just of the blues, but of much of literature and art reaching back at least as far as the time of the Greeks. In this class, we will look at a selections of texts--music, poetry, drama, fiction, film--that explore the challenge of affirming one's humanity in the face of powerlessness and untenable choices. We'll start with the blues but then reach outward to artists beyond the African American tradition--Robert Frost, Aeschylus, Kate Chopin--who wrestle in a significant way with human choice and agency. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 202-W06 Native American Literature & the Environment
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Liz Wilkinson
OR
ENGL 202-W07 Native American Lit & the Environment
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm

Prof. Liz Wilkinson
This course will use fiction and non-fiction multi-media to explore environmental issues using an indigenous lens. We'll focus a large portion of our reading on the Native nations specific to our region, largely Anishinaabe/Ojibwe and related peoples. We'll dispel the romantic stereotype of the nature-loving Native (Disney version and the like) by a focus on Native-authored texts and responses to historic and contemporary environmental issues. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. Off campus trips to local sites may be organized, including Dream of Wild Health (an Indigenous farm), Mashkiikii Gitigan (an Indigenous urban garden), All My Relations Art Gallery, and Two Rivers Gallery/Gatherings Cafe. We'll also have in-class conversations with Native American leaders in community environmental activism, and we may get to try our hand at some indigenous cooking as well. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

ENGL 337-L01 Latina Women Writers
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Olga Herrera

What kinds of insights can reading from a multicultural, internationalist perspective bring to our current moment? What can reading authors from Cuban-American, Dominican-American, Mexican-American, and Puerto Rican backgrounds teach us about the diversity we encounter in 21st century America? This course will explore literature by Latina authors writing about themes of identity, culture and politics, language, gender, religion and spirituality, and artistic experience within a contemporary U.S. context. Students will read texts published in English by authors including Isabel Allende, Julia Alvarez, Sandra Cisneros, Cristina Garcia, Cloria Anzaldua, and others. This course satisfies the Human Diversity core requirement and the Diversity distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

ENGL 370-L01 Colonial/Early American Literature
M/W 12:15-1:20pm + online component
Prof. Laura Zebuhr

This course provides an in-depth exploration of a select group of texts or authors from American Literature from the period of European discovery and colonization through the first decades following American independence. Selected texts or authors (such as Native American oral tales, John Winthrop, Anne Bradstreet, Mary Rowlandson, and Jonathan Edwards) will be studied in terms of a particular historical, cultural, or other context, or in terms of a convergence with authors or texts from other literary traditions or intellectual disciplines. Examples might include native voices in early American literature; poetry, journals, and the religious experience in colonial New England; representations of and responses to the slave trade in Colonial America; captivity narratives as literature and ideology; the myth of the wilderness. This course fulfills the Contexts and Convergences requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

HIST 113-L01 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Anne Osler]
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm
OR
HIST 113-L02 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Max Forrester]
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
OR
HIST 113-L03 Early America in Global Perspective [Prof. Max Forrester]
T/R 5:30-7:15pm
Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 114-05 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. George Woytanowitz]
T/R 8:00-9:40am
OR
HIST 114-L02 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Meliha Ceric]
M/W/F 8:15-9:20am
OR
HIST 114-L04 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Meliha Ceric]
M/W/F 9:35-10:40am
OR
HIST 114-W03 Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. David Williard]
M/W/F 12:15-1:20pm
OR
HIST 114-W41 HONORS Modern U.S. in Global Perspective [Prof. David Williard]
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 117-L01 Latin America in Global Perspective
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Kari Zimmerman

Introduces students to historical reasoning. Students learn to analyze evidence from the past in context in order to explain how the past produced the ever-changing present. This course surveys the social, political, and economic history of Latin America in global context from the Independence movements to the present. Major topics include: democracy and dictatorship, economic development and dependence, slavery and race relations, political revolution, urban and rural societies, migration, militarism, the Church and the struggle for social justice. This course fulfills the Historical Analysis requirement for the core curriculum.

HIST 211-01 Women/Families in the Americas
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Kari Zimmerman
This course examines how seemingly impersonal forces are historically associated with personal changes for women and the family across the Americas. We will analyze how women and the family intersected with the economy, politics, and society. A comparative approach allows for consideration of national circumstances and social norms regarding race, ethnicity, and class. Examining the history or women and the family throughout the Americas also highlights similarities and differences within the reciprocal relationship between private lives and public policy. Topics include working women and the family economy, slavery, political rights and protective legislature, social movements, youth culture and immigration. Understanding the history of women and the family helps explain current contentions over women’s roles and modern family structure.

HIST 355-01 American Civil War
M/W/F 1:35-2:40pm
Prof. David Williard

The American Civil War was a pivotal event, followed by incomplete efforts at changing the shape of the nation through Reconstruction. The causes of the war, its conduct on both sides, and the consequences of this "War of Rebellion," including Reconstruction, form the three parts of this course. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

IDSC 291-01 Anatomy of Violence
Tuesdays 6:00-9:15pm
Prof. Paul Schnell
The purpose of this course is to increase the knowledge and understanding of cultural, racial and
interpersonal violence and develop a commitment to promoting a violence-free society. Emphasis is on exploration of the extent, causes and effects of violence and strategies for intervention on the micro and macro levels. Specific areas of study include domestic/partner abuse, child abuse/neglect, peer/date violence, elder abuse, sexual assault/sexual harassment, cultural violence, racism and other systemic oppression. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. 

JPST 280-01 Active Nonviolence
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer
Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester.

JPST 355-D01 Public Policy Analysis & Advocacy
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Jack Nelson-Pallmeyer

In this class students will investigate how and why particular policies are developed, proposed, adopted, and implemented; will explore how social values shape and impact public policies; and will learn how to frame issues in ways that allow for more effective advocacy. The class will examine the relative power of diverse corporate and non-profit sectors in influencing policy debates and outcomes, including the role of think tanks. Students will analyze the limitations and strengths of diverse approaches to advocacy ranging from third-party appeals and solidarity efforts to elite decision makers, as well as the prospects for a politics of agency rooted in citizen-centered politics in which people mobilize to meet the needs of their communities. The course will integrate basic theory, interaction with public policy analysts and advocates, personal experience in persuasive advocacy, and case studies focused on issues such as climate change, economic inequality, land-food-hunger, and approaches to health care. Assignments will introduce students to various tools for persuasive advocacy and allow them to develop skill sets for using them. 

JPST 375-D01 Conflict Analysis and Transformation
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Amy Finnegan

An introduction to issues surrounding conflict and the resolution of conflict in today's world focusing primarily on its contextual manifestation at the international, regional and intrastate levels. The course will explore important structural, social and psychological explanations of conflict. Attention will be given to ethnic and nationalist themes surrounding conflicts and their resolution at the intrastate and international levels. The course will examine how different types of intervention affect conflicts (the media, force, other types of third party intervention). Effective methods that foster an environment conducive to resolving or managing disputes will be studied. As part of the final task, the course will critically study how institutions such as power-sharing arrangements, federalism, and the rule of law figure into establishing a lasting basis for peaceful co-existence. For Justice and Peace Studies majors doing a concentration in Conflict Transformation, the course will complement JPST 370 Conflict Mediation, but there are no prerequisites and the course is open to students in other majors. 

MUSC 133-L01 Music of the U.S.: Aural and Written
Thursday 8:00-9:40am
Prof. Jonas Westover
This course focuses on the study of U.S. music within its cultural context. The course, with its emphasis on listening analysis, and vocabulary development will contain 1) music of aural traditions to include jazz, popular, and ethnic music and 2) music of written traditions to include art music and jazz. Prerequisite: Music majors or permission of instructor. Please note that this is a 2-credit course.

MUSC 162-01 Roots of Blues, Rock, Country
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Bruce Gleason

This course traces the development of American popular music from its roots through multiple genres such as minstrelsy, jazz, big band, swing, crooning, jump blues, gospel, rhythm and blues, country, western, folk/protest, and rock 'n' roll, concluding with the British Invasion. Popular music development is critically examined through four interrelated driving forces: identity (ethnicity, gender, culture, generation), centers vs. peripheries (the established vs. the innovative), technology (impact on musical performance and listening), and business/law (commercial competition and development). Multimedia presentations include extensive audio and video support. Designed for the Popular Music minor, this course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. 

POLS 205-L01 Citizen Participation & Public Policy
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Timothy Lynch
This course focuses on American politics and public policy, with an emphasis on what both citizens and governments do, why they do it, and what difference it makes. It examines aspects of the policy process, such as agenda-setting and issue attention cycles, before covering substantive public policy issues such as education, civil rights, health care, energy and the environment, defense, and immigration. The ways in which citizens influence the public policy process through elections, interest groups, and measures of public opinion will also be considered. Prerequisite: POLS 104 or permission of instructor. 

POLS 302-W01 Women and Politics
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Angela High-Pippert

An examination of the political involvement of women in the United States, including the representation of women, feminism as a social movement, the campaign strategies and styles of women candidates, the election of women to local, state, and national office, and the impact that women make in public office. Differences between women’s and men’s political lives and differences among women will also be explored. Potential explanations for the political underrepresentation of women will be evaluated. Prerequisite: POLS 205 or permission of the instructor.

SOCI 350-W01 Social Inequality: Privilege and Power
M/W/F 8:15-9:20am
Prof. Laura Fischer

This course identifies and investigates the following topics: general principles of stratification, theoretical explanations by which inequality emerges and is maintained, the relationship between social class and other forms of inequality in the United States including gender, race, and changes in social hierarchy over time. The course will explore issues such as poverty, welfare, occupational prestige, meritocracy, and class prestige. Although primary focus is on the United States, the course also examines global inequality. Prerequisite: SOCI 100 or SOCI 110 and Junior standing.

SPAN 412-W01 Chicano/U.S. Latino Lit/Culture
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Sonia Rey-Montejo

Overview of the different issues that concern the U.S. Latino population. This course studies cultural artifacts and literary texts (in Spanish) relating to the multiple cultures of the Spanish-speaking U.S. Topics of class discussion could include: The United Farmers Workers and the Chicano Power movement in the 1960s, the role of César Chávez and Luis Valdez, and literary interpretations of the Hispanic/Latino/Chicano experience. Authors will be selected from a broad range of writers such as Cherríe Moraga, Sandra Cisneros, Rolando Hinojosa, Miguel Mendez, Julia Alvarez, Cristina Garcia, Gustavo Perez Firmat, Achy Obejas, Esmeralda Santiago, among others. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: Successful completion of SPAN 300, 301, 305, and 335 or their equivalents with a C- or better in each course

THEO 432-01 Black Religious Experience
M 5:30-9:15pm
Prof. Ry Siggelkow
This course explore Black theological development as a cultural, functional and cognitive dimension of traditional Afro-American society, including belief, worship, expression, symbol, spirituality and God. Attention will be given to the meaning and roots of the notions of culture, nationalism and racism as they appear as questions in Black theological though, including African religions, Islam and The Nation of Islam, along with Afro-American Christian theologies. African as well as Afro-American religious experience combined with the affirmation of the Christian creed are identified in order to evaluate the questions of Black Catholic theology in America today. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115.

WMST 297-01 American Masculinities
M/W 5:30-7:15pm
Prof. Vernon Klobassa
Description not provided.