640X385

NOTE: Independent studies, courses from other ACTC schools, study abroad courses, and up to two 100-level courses may be applied toward the minor with the approval of the program director, Dr. Kanishka Chowdhury (k9chowdhury@stthomas.edu).

Spring 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - L01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

20002 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ARTH 284 - L01 Arts of the African Diaspora M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 203

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 203

Course Registration Number:

22389 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Amy M. Mickelson

This course surveys the diverse arts produced by people of African descent in the Diaspora (Suriname, Brazil, Cuba, Haiti, the United States and England) from the Colonial period to the present. An examination of selected West and Central African cultural practices and art forms will serve as a basis for an understanding of creative transformations in the African Diaspora. Important issues to be addressed include art and resistance, survivals and transformations, and the construction of race and diasporic identity. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

20522 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - L01 American Authors II M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0815 - 0920

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

21955 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt

How did the modern warfare of World War I change those who fought and those who stayed at home? Why did so many of the best American artists flee to Paris? How did the traditionalism and stability of the 1950s lead to the radicalism and rebellion of the 60s? How has technology, from the typewriter to the internet, reshaped literature? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework though extensive readings in American literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as progress and innovation, war, the “lost generation,” the New Woman, race, and conformity and individuality. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. It also satisfies an allied requirement for select business majors, satisfies the core literature/writing requirement for students who started that core requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class, and satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 216 - W01 Jazz in America - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

21866 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Kachian

The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THTR 223 - L02 History of American Theater - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 126

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

21950 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

JoAnn M. Holonbek

This course focuses on the development of theater in the United States from its 17th century roots to the present, with special attention to contemporary American drama and an emphasis on the connections between theater and culture. This course fulfills both the Fine Arts requirement and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum and satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2020 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
AMCD 200 - L01 American Culture:Power/Identit M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 126

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC 126

Course Registration Number:

46760 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

In AMCD 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course satisfies the old Human Diversity requirement and the new core Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 326 - W01 Communication in Pop Culture - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 452

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 452

Course Registration Number:

45101 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Bernard J. Armada

This course focuses on the creation and use of rhetoric in public persuasion settings, including social movements and political campaigns. The diversity of rhetorical acts examined may include campaign ads, speeches, films, advertisements, music, memorials, architecture and other nonverbal strategies. Topics of study may include: The rhetoric of domination and resistance, national identity formation, and the rhetoric of public memory. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference. This course fulfills the Human Diversity Core requirement Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 BEC 113

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

44296 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 133 - W01 Music of the US: Aural & Writt - T - R - - - 1530 - 1700 BEC 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1530 - 1700

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

46719 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Sarah C. Schmalenberger

This course focuses on the study of U.S. music within its cultural context. The course, with its emphasis on listening analysis, and vocabulary development will contain 1) music of aural traditions to include jazz, popular, and ethnic music and 2) music of written traditions to include art music and jazz. Prerequisite: Music majors or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MUSC 216 - W01 USA Jazz: From Duke to Drake - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

BEC 110

Course Registration Number:

44009 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Christopher S. Kachian

The origins and history of jazz in the United States. Various phases in the development of jazz style are discussed. Blues, ragtime, Dixieland, swing, bop, cool jazz, fusion, as well as other recent developments in jazz performances are investigated. An essential part of the course is the analysis and evaluation of recorded performances by outstanding jazz musicians. Designed for non-majors as well as an elective for music majors interested in jazz. Offered fall semester. This course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SOCI 251 - W01 Race and Ethnicity M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 207

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 207

Course Registration Number:

44066 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Patricia L. Maddox

Race and ethnicity as significant components of U.S. social structure; the cognitive and normative aspects of culture which maintain and effect varying manifestations of social distance, tension, prejudice and discrimination between majority and minorities at both micro and macro levels, nationally and internationally. This course meets a requirement in American Cultural Studies and Justice and Peace Studies and fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: sophomore standing

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

American Culture & Difference
   Fall 2020 Additional Approved Courses

 
ARTH 250-L01 Museum Studies: Collections
M/W 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Vanessa Rousseau

In this course, museum successes and failures will be examined in relation to the broad topics of exhibition design, collecting, politics, tourism, museum organizational structures, architecture, and education. The course combines thematic and theoretical classroom discussions with practical and experiential museum components. This course will provide an opportunity for discussions with museum professionals. Partnerships with regional museums will provide hands-on project opportunities during the semester. This course satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

ARTH 265-L01 Art and Archaeology of Ancient Mesoamerica
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. William Barnes

A survey of Pre-Columbian art and architecture of Ancient Mesoamerica (parts of present day Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, Honduras, and El Salvador). Specific artistic practices, iconography, and the cultural contexts of selected works of art and architecture will be covered. Course participants will be expected to address the significance of various culture groups within Mesoamerica and be able to discuss, in an informed manner, the salient characteristics and cultural context of select major works of art and architecture. This course fulfills the fine arts and human diversity requirements within the core curriculum. It also fulfills a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

ENGL 202-W03 Native American Literature & the Environment (M/W/F 9:35-10:40am)
ENGL 202-W06 Native American Literature & the Environment (M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm)
Prof. Liz Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

ENGL 202-W05 or HIST 292-W01 Reading Black Resistance
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Todd Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

ENGL 202-W10 American Manhood: WWII thru #MeToo
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Brian Brown

What does it mean to be a man in America today? According to Ron Swanson’s “Pyramid of Greatness,” live simply, fend for yourself and eat meat. Lots of meat. For generations, men were promised an equally straightforward road map to navigate adolescence through adulthood: college + job + home + family = happily ever after. But that social contract was a fraud. When these basic expectations failed to materialize, many young men responded in predictable ways. Faced with what they perceived as an attempt to usurp their inherent power and authority, they lashed out in anger, sexual violence and self-medication. And now even these destructive behaviors have been exposed for what they are - desperate attempts to control a world that offers no clear path to manhood. So, as we enter a new decade, what defines American Manhood? For an overview of American manhood we’ll read from Jack Donovan’s THE WAY OF MAN. Primary reading sources include Chuck Palahniuk’s look at the apathetic and violent existence of the American male in FIGHT CLUB. We’ll read nonfiction selections BETWEEN THE WORLD AND ME by Ta-Nehisi Coates and the recently released memoir KNOW MY NAME by Chanel Miller. And we’ll examine the role of husband, father and survivor in Cormac McCarthy’s post-apocalyptic world of THE ROAD. Supporting material will include plays, short stories and films - such as BOYHOOD, MOONLIGHT and I LOVE YOU, MAN. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal, revised writing. This course satisfies the WAC Writing Intensive requirement and an Integration in the Humanities requirement.

ENGL 214-L01 American Authors I
M/W/F 9:45-10:40am
Prof. Andrew Scheiber
Where does the popular perception of America as the “New World” come from? How could slavery flourish in a land idealizing freedom? Why were immigrants so feared and reviled? Why did expansionism push out some and make millionaires of others? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings from the beginnings of the American literary tradition to the turn of the twentieth century. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as religious identity, political reform, race, slavery, war, gender, and industrialization. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. This course satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203 or 204.

ENGL 217-L01 Multicultural Literature
M/W 1:35-3:10pm
Prof. Liz Wilkinson

What does it mean to be labeled an African American dramatist? A Latino/a poet? A transgender novelist? An Asian American essayist? A Native American environmental writer? How do the varied experiences and backgrounds of authors writing from diverse subject positions inform, mark, and/or transform their writing? How do the works of these writers fit into, conflict with, actively resist, or even redefine the American Literary canon as it has been traditionally understood? These questions and more will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive reading of literature from: a) American communities of color; b) postcolonial peoples; c) immigrant and/or diasporic peoples; or d) LGBTQ communities. This course will focus on the literary and cultural texts of one or more of these groups with an emphasis on the cultural, political, and historical contexts that surround them. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major, and the Human Diversity Requirement in the Core Curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. This course satisfies the both the core Literature and Writing requirement for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 class and the core Human Diversity requirement, fulfills both the Historical Perspectives and the Diversity Literature requirements in the English major, and satisfies a WAC Writing to Learn requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

ENGL 341-L01 Literature by Women: Between Worlds
M/W/F 10:55am-12:00pm
Prof. Catherine Craft-Fairchild

This course will examine liminality and intersectionality. In our core text, BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA, Gloria Anzaldua writers about being "caught between worlds, a no man's land....A hybrid, a mixture, a mestiza: 'Alienated from her mother culture, "alien" in the dominant culture, the woman of color [is] caught between...the spaces between the different worlds she inhabits.'" Gender and race intersect to create this "no man's land" in Nella Larsen in QUICKSAND and PASSING, Gloria Naylor's MAMA DAY, and Natasha Trethewey's BELLOCQ'S OPHELIA. Gender and sexuality produce alienation in Patricia Highsmith's THE PRICE OF SALT/CAROL, and Billy Ben-Moshe's MELTING AWAY. All texts would center on women whose lives involve the difficult negotiations of the border dweller. This course satisfies both the core Human Diversity requirement and the Diversity requirement for English majors, and a Contexts and Convergences requirement for English majors. It also satisfies a requirement for the Women's Studies major and minor, the core Literature and Writing requirement (for students who started that requirement with an ENGL 201-204 or 206 class), and a WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

HIST 113 Early American History from a Global Perspective
Multiple Times
Multiple Instructors

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

HIST 114 Modern U.S. from a Global Perspective
Multiple Times
Multiple Instructors
Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. Select sections of this course satisfy the WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

HIST 207-01 Slavery in the Americas
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Prof. Kari Zimmerman

By examining slave societies in Brazil, Cuba, and the United States, this course considers the commonalities and differences in African slavery across the Americas during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. We trace the history of slavery and society through such topics as the Atlantic Trade, plantation v. urban labor, family life, religion and culture, gender, resistance and rebellion, and post-emancipation race relations. Throughout the course, we consider how geographic location and social norms created parallel but distinct systems of slavery. Moreover, we will focus on the sources and methods employed for analyzing those groups that typically lack a historical voice. Focusing on the historiography of slavery, students will gain experience in effectively using evidence to develop an argument, thinking comparatively as a way to analyze information, and learning how to assess or evaluate arguments made by scholars. By the end of the course, students will recognize both the historical conditions of slavery in the Americas and the scholarly treatment of the subject.

HIST 358-01 20th-Century U.S.
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Stephen Hausmann

An intensive study of 20th-century United States domestic history, with emphasis on social change and social thought. Topics include: reform movements, industrialization, urbanization, the economy, the homefront, consumer culture, suburbanization, liberation movements, and deindustrialization. Prerequisite: one 100-level history course.

HONR 480-02 50 Years Since Stonewall: Sexuality, Race, & Resistance
T/R 1:30-3:10pm
Profs. J Roxanne Prichard (PSYC) and Patricia Maddox (Justice & Society Studies)

This course will examine the intersection of race, gender, sexuality, and identity from both a sociological and psychological perspective. Historical and contemporary LGBTQ* issues such as access to mental health care, physical health care, and legal issues around discrimination and harassment will be explored. We will also highlight social change, social movements, and resistance around these issues throughout the course. The course goals are to provide students with an understanding of LGBTQ* rights issues since the 1969 Stonewall Uprising, while also allowing students to envision the future and where to fight for social change.

JPST 280-W01 Active Nonviolence
T/R 9:55-11:35am
Prof. Mike Klein

Active nonviolence as a means for societal defense and social transformation analyzed through case studies of actual nonviolent movements, examining their political philosophy and how this philosophy is reflected in their methods and strategies. Examples of possible case studies include: Mahatma Gandhi's movement for a free India, Danish resistance to Nazi occupation, the struggle for interracial justice in the United State, an integrated Canada-to-Cuba peace-and-freedom walk, the campaign to close the U.S. Army School of the Americas (WHINSEC), fair trade movements, and the Honeywell Project. The course emphasizes the theory and active practice of nonviolence as well as oral histories of successful nonviolent movements. Usually offered every semester. This course satisfies a WAC Writing Intensive requirement.

JPST 365-D01 Leadership for Social Justice
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Michael Klein

Leadership for Social Justice examines the arc of leadership through the process of creating, sustaining, then institutionalizing positive social change. The course examines models and case studies of authoritative, positional, influential and situational leadership in diverse settings such as community organizing, social movements, social entrepreneurship and nonprofit management. The course also explores approaches to ethical leadership and provides opportunities for students to develop the skills and vision needed to become ethical leaders for social justice. Students will analyze the role of leadership in the tensions between preserving order and promoting transformation. They will develop a critical approach to the dynamics of power in order to effect systemic change. This course satisfies the WAC Writing in the Discipline requirement.

MUSC 162-W01 Roots of Blues, Rock, Country
M/W 3:30-5:00pm
Prof. Bruce Gleason
This course traces the development of American popular music from its roots through multiple genres such as minstrelsy, jazz, big band, swing, crooning, jump blues, gospel, rhythm and blues, country, western, folk/protest, and rock 'n' roll, concluding with the British Invasion. Popular music development is critically examined through four interrelated driving forces: identity (ethnicity, gender, culture, generation), centers vs. peripheries (the established vs. the innovative), technology (impact on musical performance and listening), and business/law (commercial competition and development). Multimedia presentations include extensive audio and video support. Designed for the Popular Music minor, this course fulfills the Fine Arts and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. This course satisfies a Writing Intensive requirement.

POLS 205-L01 Citizen Participation and Public Policy
T/R 8:00-9:40am
Prof. Angela High-Pippert
This course focuses on American politics and public policy, with an emphasis on what both citizens and governments do, why they do it, and what difference it makes. It examines aspects of the policy process, such as agenda-setting and issue attention cycles, before covering substantive public policy issues such as education, civil rights, health care, energy and the environment, defense, and immigration. The ways in which citizens influence the public policy process through elections, interest groups, and measures of public opinion will also be considered. Prerequisite: POLS 104 or permission of instructor. This course satisfies the WAC Writing to Learn requirement.

SOCI 110-01 Social Problems
M/W/F 8:15-9:20am
Prof. Laura Fischer
Contemporary society is confronted with a number of serious problems that are often global in their impact. This course explores the causes, effects, and proposed solutions to some of these major social issues. Special attention is given to issues of inequality (such as racism, sexism, and poverty) and problems in core institutions (such as family violence, unequal educational opportunities, and unemployment). This course meets a requirement in the Justice and Peace Studies program and fulfills the Social Analysis and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum. 

SPAN 485-01 Hispanic Visual Culture & Literature
T/R 5:30-7:15pm
Prof. Irene Domingo

This course is a survey of the literature and arts in the Spanish-speaking World from the Medieval Ages until today. Students will read different types of texts produced in Iberian and Latin American cultures. These readings, together with discussions and analysis of selected iconic buildings, paintings, sculptures, maps, photographs, comics, and movies, will provide students with a broad understanding of Hispanic cultural, literary and artistic production, as well as the transatlantic movements, encounters, and connections between cultures over the years.

THEO 227-W03 Contexts: Liberation Theology
T/R 3:25-5:00pm
Prof. Ry Siggelkow

This section takes seriously James H. Cone's message in his 1969 work, Black Theology and Black Power, that "Black Power is Christ's central message to twentieth-century America." It explores the meaning and practical significance of Christ’s message of liberation in the twenty-first century, examining theologies that have emerged out of a context of struggle (e.g., black & black feminist/womanist theology, South African theology, Latina/o theology, minjung theology, and queer theology).