Dina Gavrilos portrait

Dina Gavrilos

Associate Professor
Degree
B.A., University of Illinois at Chicago
M.A., University of Kentucky
Ph.D., University of Iowa
Office
OEC 119C
Phone
(651) 962-5204
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5204
Mail
Mail 5011
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Avenue
St. Paul, MN 55105

Professional experience:

Professor Gavrilos earned a doctorate in mass communication from the University of Iowa; a master of arts in communication from the University of Kentucky; and, a bachelor of arts in communication and English from the University of Illinois at Chicago.  Prior to joining academia, Professor Gavrilos worked in public relations agencies in Chicago.  

Scholarship and service:

As a first-generation American, Professor Gavrilos has always been intrigued about questions of identity and what it means to be “American.”  Her critical theory/cultural studies-oriented scholarship analyzes the mediated re-production of social power through intersecting race, ethnic and class identities (among others), particularly those communicated through news discourses. Writing and presenting on this topic since 2000, Professor Gavrilos seeks to bring attention, both inside and outside the classroom, to the sociocultural injustices facing those deemed outside the norms of U.S. culture.  Her courses include: Media, Culture and Society; Communication of Race, Class, Gender; and, Introduction to Communication and Journalism

In addition to presenting research at more than a dozen national and international academic conferences, Professor Gavrilos has published peer-reviewed articles in Journal of Communication Inquiry, Critical Discourse Studies, and Journal of Philosophy and History of Education.  Most recently (2015), her book chapter “American” Children’s Success and Global Competitiveness: The Racial Paradox of Bilingualism as Cultural Capital” was published in the edited volume The Rhetorics of US Immigration: Identity, Community, Otherness by Penn State University Press.  Analyzing the racial discourses surrounding the election of the first U.S. black president, Professor Gavrilos published “White Males Lose Presidency for First Time: Exposing the Power of Whiteness through Obama’s Victory” in the SUNY Press edited volume The Obama Effect: Multidisciplinary Renderings of the 2008 Campaign

Professor Gavrilos has also conducted applied research about representations of Latinos in the news at the national and local levels, research designed to reach journalism professionals and the wider community.  She produced An Analysis of the Portrayal of Latinos in the Nation’s Three Leading News Magazines in 2005 that came out in 2006 in partnership with the National Association of Hispanic Journalists and The Media Empowerment Report: An Analysis of Minnesota Newspapers’ Portrayal of Latinos released in 2007 sponsored by the University of Minnesota Department of Chicano/a Studies and the Otto Bremer Foundation.  

At UST:
Professor Gavrilos joined UST in 2006. 

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
COJO 328 - D01 Comm of Race, Class & Gender M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 210

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 210

Course Registration Number:

20615 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Dina Gavrilos

This course focuses on theories and research of the historical and contemporary correlation between gender, race, class, and communicative practices, including rhetorical practice and mass communication content. It includes the influence of gender and racial stereotypes on public speech and debate, political campaigns and communication, organizational leadership, news coverage and advertising. Topics include: gendered perceptions of credibility; who is allowed to communicate and who is silenced due to class and racial privilege; and the impact of gender, race and class stereotypes about human nature, expertise, and abilities on individuals and groups that want to participate in public culture and communication. Students analyze and evaluate their own communicative styles in light of course readings and activities. This course fulfills a requirement in American Culture and Difference, Justice and Peace Studies, Women's Studies, and the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 480 - 01 Communication Ethics - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 303

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 303

Course Registration Number:

20928 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Dina Gavrilos

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront communication professionals and audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on communication ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues in communication, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills, and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 480 - 02 Communication Ethics - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 303

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 303

Course Registration Number:

20546 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Dina Gavrilos

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront communication professionals and audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on communication ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues in communication, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills, and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - 01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Dina Gavrilos

In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 480 - 01 Communication Ethics - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 BEC 114

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

BEC 114

Course Registration Number:

40616 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

Dina Gavrilos

This capstone seminar for graduating seniors explores ethical issues that confront communication professionals and audiences. Students explore theoretical perspectives on communication ethics, work from case studies to understand professional ethical standards, discuss current ethical issues in communication, work in teams to perfect oral and written ethical analysis skills, and write an individual thesis paper. Prerequisites: graduating seniors only and permission of department chair

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)