David C. Williard  portrait

David C. Williard

Assistant Professor
Degree
Ph.D. History, Univ of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 2012.

Office
JRC 417
Phone
(651) 962-5736
Fax
651-962-5741
Mail
JRC 432
2115 Summit Avenue
St. Paul MN 55105
CV

David C. Williard is a historian of the United States.  He specializes in the transformative effects of war on the meaning of citizenship, with a particular interest in the Civil War and Reconstruction.  More broadly, his teaching and research interrogate how contested identities emerge from the intersection of ideology and experience.  He is at work on a book titled Confederate Legacy: The Problem of Soldierhood in the Post-Civil War South, and has a chapter titled "An Ideology Beyond Defeat" in Paul Quigley, ed, The Civil War and the Transformation of American Citizenship, currently under review at Louisiana State University Press.  He teaches courses in modern United States history, the Civil War era, United States military history, slavery, emancipation, and civil rights, and violence in American history.  

Summer 2018 Courses

Summer 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2018 Courses

Fall 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 202 - W03 Reading Black Resistance M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

42603 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

41683 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - W06 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1440

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

40452 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

David C. Williard

Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - W01 Reading Black Resistance M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 247

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 247

Course Registration Number:

42729 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4 Credit Hours

Instructor:

David C. Williard, David T. Lawrence

This course, team-taught by a historian and a literary scholar, focuses on the long struggle of African Americans for justice and equality in the U.S. Analyzing literary and historical texts, students in this course will learn about and engage in research on African American history and culture. Utilizing historical, literary, and cultural approaches, this interdisciplinary course will immerse students into an exploration of the African American experience from multiple perspectives using dual disciplinary frameworks. For example, students may study Richard Wright’s NATIVE SON, but would read the text within the historical and cultural framework of the Great Migration, connecting Wright’s text not just to other literary texts, but situating it within an historical and cultural context vital to the novel’s creation and essential for its interpretation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2019 Courses

J-Term 2019 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location