Low- and Medium-Stakes Rubrics

Low- and Medium-Stakes Rubrics

Because students do not spend a lot of time writing low-and medium-stakes assignments, you should not spend a lot of time grading them; in fact, you may not need to grade them at all. If students see that you are using the assignments in class, they will be motivated to complete them.

However, if you do want students to be somewhat accountable for these assignments, here are some principles to keep in mind:

  • Make sure your criteria match your learning goals. If learning to use correct grammar is not a learning goal of the assignment, then don’t make that part of the evaluation. Stick to your goals (ideally, no more than 1-3).
  • Keep the grade range minimal. A range of three: 0, 1, or 2 points; 0, check minus, check. Or a range of two: 0, 1; 0, check.
  • To avoid being overwhelmed with grading frequent low- or medium-stakes assignments:        - Resist the urge to write a lot on them, especially marking surface errors. Stick to your rubric and, at most, point out something the student did especially well.        - Instead of evaluating each assignment as it comes in, you can grade them in batches a few times during the semester. Again, if you are using the assignments in class this will not be a problem.