High-Stakes Rubrics

High-Stakes Rubrics

Because students spend more time drafting and revising high-stakes writings it makes sense to create more developed evaluation rubrics for these assignments. Also, because you have supported these assignments extensively, you now may hold the final products to a higher standard.

  • As with the lower-stakes assignments, align your evaluation criteria directly with your learning goals for the assignment.
  • Decide if you want to use a holistic or an analytic rubric. Holistic rubrics describe different levels of performance (the “A,” “B,” “C,” “D” paper). Analytic rubrics describe different levels of performance (e.g. “Strong,” “Satisfactory,” “Weak”) for each evaluation criterion (“The essay includes a complex, arguable thesis,” “The informational needs of the audience are met,” “Correct APA citation format,” etc.)
  • Review your rubric to see if it captures what you expect students to learn through the assignment and accurately distinguishes different levels of execution. When you use it on student papers, make notes on where it may need tweaking for the next time.