Jennifer Awes-Freeman portrait

Jennifer Awes-Freeman

Visiting Assistant Professor
Degree
Ph.D.
Office
JRC 112
Phone
(651) 962-5309

Jennifer Awes Freeman is a Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of St Thomas for 2016-2018 as a postdoctoral fellow at the Louisville Institute. She recently completed her doctoral work at Vanderbilt University; her dissertation, “Erasing God: Carolingians, Controversy, and the Ashburnham Pentateuch,” is a study of Trinitarian doctrine and images during the transition from Late Antiquity to the early Middle Ages. During the summer of 2016, she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Medieval Institute at the University of Notre Dame, for which she began a translation of Hrabanus Maurus’ In honorem sanctae crucis. Jennifer’s research interests include images of divinity, iconoclasm, material culture, gender studies, the mutual influence of art and theology, and book culture in the digital humanities.

She is the author of:

  • “The Good Shepherd and the Enthroned Ruler: A Reconsideration of Imperial Iconography in the Early Church,” in The Art of the Empire: Christian Art in its Imperial Context, Lee Jefferson and Robin Jensen, eds., (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2015).
  • “Erasing God: The Ashburnham Pentateuch in its 9th c. Context and Beyond,” Allegorica 30 (Summer 2015).
  • “Theologizing Gender in the Rothschild Canticles,” Medieval Feminist Forum 48.2 (Winter 2012).

 

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THEO 101 - W02 Christian Theo Tradition M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 104
CRN: 40430 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer C. Awes-Freeman This course is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 101 - W03 Christian Theo Tradition M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 106
CRN: 42295 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer C. Awes-Freeman This course is designed to acquaint students with the contents of the Bible and with Christian history, especially in the context of the Catholic tradition. Through careful reading of a core of common texts and a variety of written assignments, students are expected to attain a basic understanding of human experience in the light of major areas of theology, including revelation, God, creation, Jesus and the Church.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
THEO 453 - W01 Theology & Art M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 207
CRN: 21667 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer C. Awes-Freeman Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, one Art History course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 453 - W02 Theology & Art M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 246
CRN: 21668 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer C. Awes-Freeman Through the ages, the relationship between theology and the arts has been mutually enriching, resulting in some of the world's masterpieces of visual art, architecture, music, and literature. The relationship, too, has been strained by iconoclastic movements which express fear that the arts tempt people with idolatry. In this course, students will consider the theological dimensions of the complex relationship between theology and the arts. Emphasis on historical periods, themes, doctrines, intersections, and types of art will vary according to the expertise of the instructors. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, one Art History course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)