The University of St. Thomas

School of Social Work

Conference Resources

Social Work for Social Justice
Strengthening Social Work Practice through the Integration of Catholic Social Teaching

 ~~~ Itemized Table of Contents  ~~~


I.    Table of Contents

II.    Acknowledgments

III.    Foundation Documents
a.    Philosophy Statement
b.    Finding Common Ground: Guidelines for Dialogue
c.    Social Work for Social Justice: Ten Principles
d.    Social Work for Social Justice: An Integrative Approach

IV.    The Call to Justice: Social Work in Catholic Higher Education. Barbara Shank, Ph.D.

V.    Social Work for Social Justice: Strengthening Social Work Practice through the integration of Catholic Social Teaching. Mary Ann Brenden, M.S.W.

VI.    Learning Modules: Social Policy

My Ideological Perspective and Personal Values: What are They and How Do They ‘Line Up’ with Social Work? Mary Ann Brenden.

Social Activists Working for Social Justice. Mary Ann Brenden and Amata Miller.    

Self Reflection, Passion, Mission. Dorothea Marie Epple.    

Intersection of Differing Ethical Frameworks and Complex Social Issues. Jessica Toft.    

Policy Analysis from Two Perspectives: A Social Justice Framework and a Policy Science Framework. Sarah Ferguson.

NASW Policy Statements: Policy Analysis and Advocacy for Change. Theresa McPartlin and Mary Ann Brenden.    

Social Policy Analysis from a Justice Perspective. Mary Ann Brenden.    

Social and Economic Disparity: Using the Justice Principles to Understand Local/Regional Disparity/Prosperity. Mary Ann Brenden.    

Edward R. Murrow’s Harvest of Shame: Through the Lens of Justice Principles. Mary Ann Brenden.    

Being Poor without Resources: A Reflective Essay on Visiting the “Welfare” Office. Mary Ann Brenden.    

Mental Health Policy and Consumer Recovery. Ronald John San Nicolas.    

Social Work, Social Justice and Native Americans. Joyce Z. White.    

“Incorporating Catholic Social Teachings in Courses with a Focus on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Individuals and Their Families.” John R. Yoakam.    

The Modern Family – Public Families and Private Families: Do Same-Sex Families Qualify as Real Families? Sheila Nelson.    

Individual Change versus Social Change? Dorothea Marie Epple.    

Why Care for the Stranger? Dorothea Marie Epple.    

Peace not War: A Perspective of Values regarding War from 13th Century St. Francis, Dorothy Day, the Catholic Workers Movement, and N.A.S.W. Micheal Weuste.    

Begging: Lessons and the History of Charity in the 13th Century. Micheal Weuste.    

VII. Learning Modules: Human Behavior and the Social Environment

The Influence of Personal Background: A Theory-Driven Assessment. Julia Pryce and Michael Kelly, et al.    

Strengthening Social Justice Values and Ethics Through Development of Student’s Initial Mission Statement. Frances Bernard Kominkiewicz.    

“Big Momma”: Through the Lens of Justice Principles. Mary Ann Brenden and Serene Thornton.    

Can You Call It Racism?: An Organizational Case Study and Role Play Approach. Othelia Lee and Betty Blythe, et al.    

Mental Illness and Human Dignity: The Subjective Experience. David Roseborough and Stephanie Spandl.    

VIII. Learning Modules: Skills for Practice

Field of Social Work Practice: Student Presentations. Mary Ann Brenden. 

Social Justice Principles of Catholic Social Teachings and Ethical Preferences for Empowerment Social Work. Brenda DuBois and Karla Miley.    

Developing a Personal Social Justice Credo. Mary Ann Brenden and Amata Miller.    

Self Reflection Paper. Dorothea Marie Epple.    

Community Embeddedness: Pathways to Pursue Justice in Social Service Settings. Theresa McPartlin.    

Integrating Catholic Social Teaching into Macro Social Work Practice. Emma T Lucas-Darby.    

Action Project and Synthesis Paper. Linda Kardos.   

Client Assessment: Including the Social Justice Principles. Tamara Kaiser and Stephanie Spandl.    
Working with Culturally Diverse Clients: A Reflective Essay. Tamara Kaiser and Stephanie Spandl.    

Essay: Letter on Oppression. Valandra.    

A Matching Program between Students Learning about Older Adults and Elders from Diverse Communities. Rochelle Rottenberg.    

Introducing Students to Catholic Social Teaching through the Legacy and Mission of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet. Gary Behrman.    

Operationalizing Social Justice in Social Work Curriculum Content: “Preferential Options for the Poor.” Julia Pryce and Michael Kelly, et al.    

Spiritually Sensitive Professional Development of Self in Field Education: An Ignatian approach. Shelagh Larkin.    

Doing versus Being. Dorothea Marie Epple.    

IX. Learning Modules: Integration across the Curriculum

Social Work for Social Justice: PowerPoint Presentation.  Mary Ann Brenden.

Catholic Social Teaching: A Social Justice Lens for Social Work. Mary Ann Brenden.    

Social Work Values/Ethics and Catholic Social Teaching: How Do They Line Up? Mary Ann Brenden.  

Social Justice from the Perspective of Diverse Religions. Mary Ann Brenden.    

My Values and Catholic Social Teaching:How Do They Line Up? Mary Ann Brenden.    

Volunteer Experience: Two Feet of Social Ministry. Brenda DuBois and Karla Miley.    

Considering Economic Justice for All as a Curriculum Resource. Helen Deines.    

Introducing Economic Justice for All as a Resource for Social Work. Helen Deines.    

Brown Bagging: Follow-Up Discussion to EJFA Introduction. Helen Deines.    

How Do Diverse Faith Traditions Speak about Economic Justice? Helen Deines.    

How EJFA Became A Catholic Framework for Economic Life. Helen Deines.    

Applying A Catholic Framework for Economic Life: Outsourcing Eligibility. Helen Deines.    

The Myth of the Level Playing Field: Experiencing “Social and Economic Justice.” Helen Deines.    

Does Economic Life Support the Common Good? The Case of the GI Bill. Helen Deines.    

How Are the Poor and Vulnerable Faring in the Midst of Charity and Justice? Helen Deines.    

Learning from Our Clothes: A Global Perspective on Economic Justice. Helen Deines.    

Examining Racism: Society and Self. A Reflective Essay on my Experiences Related to Racial Diversity Using the Video Crash. Mary Ann Brenden.    

Film Critique: Social Justice and Human Rights. Brenda DuBois and Karla Miley.    

Literature Review: Social Work Empowerment, Social Justice, Human Rights, and Catholic Social Teaching. Brenda DuBois and Karla Miley.    

Learning Module: Classroom Tools and Ideas. Michael Kelly and Julia Pryce, et al.    

Learning Module: Integrating Catholic Social Teachings in a Social Work Curriculum. Joseph Gallegos. 

Saints for Social Work. Tom Gilsenan.  

X. Learning Modules: Collaborating in Agency and Community Settings

Community Social Work. Jennifer Nordstrom.

Promotion of Social Justice and Recovery Oriented Systems of Care in a Mental Health Setting. Ronald John San Nicolas.    

Module on Conference Development to Further the Social Justice Mission of a University Institute. Anita Lightburn and Dale Lindquist.    

Gannon University’s Annual Social Work Club Christmas Dinner and Wellness Fair Collaborating for Justice through Partnership: Engaging Community Partnership with Agencies, Parishes and International Entities. Parris J. Baker.    

XI. Learning Modules: Global Connections

Understanding Social Work as an International Human Rights Profession. Pamela Carlson Long.    

International Social Work. Jennifer Nordstrom.    

Emerging Global Ethics Speak to Social Justice. Stephanie Spandl.    

Catholic Social Teaching and Peacemaking Practice. James Allen.  

XII. Poverty in America: A Threat to the Common Good

Catholic Charities U.S.A.

XIII. Justice for Newcomers: A Catholic Call for Solidarity and Reform

Catholic Charities U.S.A.

XIV. Bibliography

XV. Index of Module Contributors

 
Index of Module Contributors

•    Allen, James. Catholic Social Teaching and Peacemaking Practice, X.6
•    Baker, Parris J. Gannon University’s Annual Social Work Club Christmas Dinner and Wellness Fair Collaborating for Justice through Partnership: Engaging Community Partnership with Agencies, Parishes and International Entities, X.10
•    Behrman, Gary. Introducing Students to Catholic Social Teaching through the Legacy and Mission of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, VIII.22
•    Blythe, Betty andLee, Othelia, et al. Can You Call It Racism?: An Organizational Case Study and Role Play Approach, VII.7
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Being Poor without Resources: A Reflective Essay on Visiting the “Welfare” Office, VI.14
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Catholic Social Teaching: A Social Justice Lens for Social Work, IX.7
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Edward R. Murrow’s Harvest of Shame: Through the Lens of Justice Principles, VI.12
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Examining Racism: Society and Self. A Reflective Essay on my Experiences Related to Racial Diversity Using the Video “Crash,”  IX.30
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Field of Social Work Practice: Student Presentations, VIII.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. My Ideological Perspective and Personal Values: What are They and How Do They ‘Line Up’ with Social Work? VI.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. My Values and Catholic Social Teaching: How Do They Line Up? XI.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social and Economic Disparity: Using the Justice Principles to Understand Local/Regional Disparity/Prosperity, VI.11
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Justice from the Perspective of Diverse Religions, IX.9
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Policy Analysis from a Justice Perspective, VI.9
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Work for Social Justice: PowerPoint Presentation, IX.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Work Values/Ethics and Catholic Social Teaching: How Do They Line Up? IX.8
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and McPartlin, Theresa. NASW Policy Statements: Policy Analysis and Advocacy for Change, VI.8
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and Miller, Amata. Developing a Personal Social Justice Credo,VIII.4
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and Miller, Amata. Social Activists Working for Social Justice, VI.2
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and Thornton, Serene. “Big Momma”: Through the Lens of Justice Principles, VII.6
•    Deines, Helen. Applying A Catholic Framework for Economic Life: Outsourcing Eligibility, IX.21
•    Deines, Helen. Brown Bagging: Follow-Up Discussion to EJFA Introduction, IX.16
•    Deines, Helen. Considering Economic Justice for All as a Curriculum Resource, IX.12
•    Deines, Helen. Does Economic Life Support the Common Good? The Case of the GI Bill, IX.25
•    Deines, Helen. How Are the Poor and Vulnerable Faring in the Midst of Charity and Justice?  IX.26
•    Deines, Helen. How Do Diverse Faith Traditions Speak about Economic Justice? IX.17
•    Deines, Helen. How EJFA Became A Catholic Framework for Economic Life, IX.19
•    Deines, Helen. Introducing Economic Justice for All as a Resource for Social Work, IX.14
•    Deines, Helen. Learning from Our Clothes: A Global Perspective on Economic Justice, IX.27
•    Deines, Helen. The Myth of the Level Playing Field: Experiencing “Social & Economic Justice,” IX.22
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Film Critique: Social Justice and Human Rights, IX.31
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Literature Review: Social Work Empowerment, Social Justice, Human Rights, and Catholic Social Teaching, IX.33
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Social Justice Principles of Catholic Social Teachings and Ethical Preferences for Empowerment Social Work, VIII.2
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Volunteer Experience: Two Feet of Social Ministry, IX.11
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Doing versus Being, VIII.30
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Individual Change versus Social Change? VI.20
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Self Reflection Paper, VIII.15
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Self Reflection, Passion, Mission, VI.3
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Why Care for the Stranger? VI.21
•    Ferguson, Sarah. Policy Analysis from Two Perspectives: A Social Justice Framework and a Policy Science Framework, VI.7
•    Gallegos, Joseph. Learning Module: Integrating Catholic Social Teachings in a Social Work Curriculum, IX.40
•    Gilsenan, Tom. Saints for Social Work, IX.41
•    Kaiser, Tamara and Spandl, Stephanie. Client Assessment: Including the Social Justice Principles, VIII.10
•    Kaiser, Tamara and Spandl, Stephanie. Working with Culturally Diverse Clients: A Reflective Essay, VIII.11
•    Kardos, Linda. Action Project and Synthesis Paper, VIII.9
•    Kelly, Michael and Pryce, Julia, et al. The Influence of Personal Background: A Theory-Driven Assessment, VII.1
•    Kelly, Michael and Pryce, Julia, et al. Learning Module: Classroom Tools and Ideas, IX.39
•    Kelly, Michael and Pryce, Julia, et al. Operationalizing Social Justice in Social Work Curriculum Content: “Preferential Options for the Poor,” VIII.24
•    Kominkiewicz, Frances Bernard. Strengthening Social Justice Values and Ethics Through Development of Student’s Initial Mission Statement, VII.5
•    Larkin, Shelagh. Spiritually Sensitive Professional Development of Self in Field Education: An Ignatian Approach, VIII.28
•    Lee, Othelia and Blythe, Betty, et al. Can You Call It Racism?: An Organizational Case Study and Role Play Approach, VII.7
•    Lightburn, Anita and Lindquist, Dale. Module on Conference Development to Further the Social Justice Mission of a University Institute, X.4
•    Lindquist, Dale and Lightburn, Anita. Module on Conference Development to Further the Social Justice Mission of a University Institute, X.4
•    Long, Pamela. Understanding Social Work as an International Human Rights Profession, XI.1
•    Lucas-Darby, Emma T. Integrating Catholic Social Teaching into Macro Social Work Practice, VIII.7
•    McPartlin, Theresa. Community Embeddedness: Pathways to Pursue Justice in Social Service Settings, VIII.6
•    McPartlin, Theresa and Brenden, Mary Ann. NASW Policy Statements: Policy Analysis and Advocacy for Change, VI.8
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Film Critique: Social Justice and Human Rights, IX.31
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Literature Review: Social Work Empowerment, Social Justice, Human Rights, and Catholic Social Teaching, IX.33
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Social Justice Principles of Catholic Social Teachings and Ethical Preferences for Empowerment Social Work, VIII.2
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Volunteer Experience: Two Feet of Social Ministry, IX.11
•    Miller, Amata and Brenden, Mary Ann. Developing a Personal Social Justice Credo, VIII.4
•    Miller, Amata and Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Activists Working for Social Justice, VI.2
•    Nelson, Sheila. The Modern Family – Public Families and Private Families: Do Same-Sex Families Qualify as Real Families? VI.19
•    Nordstrom, Jennifer. Community Social Work, X.1
•    Nordstrom, Jennifer. International Social Work, XI.3
•    Pryce, Julia and Kelly, Michael, et al. The Influence of Personal Background: A Theory-Driven Assessment, VII.1
•    Pryce, Julia and Kelly, Michael, et al. Learning Module: Classroom Tools and Ideas, IX.39
•    Pryce, Julia and Kelly, Michael, et al. Operationalizing Social Justice in Social Work Curriculum Content: “Preferential Options for the Poor,” VIII.24
•    Roseborough, David and Spandl, Stephanie. Mental Illness and Human Dignity: The Subjective Experience, VII.10
•    Rottenberg, Rochelle. A Matching Program between Students Learning about Older Adults and Elders from Diverse Communities, VIII.20
•    San Nicolas, Ronald John. Mental Health Policy and Consumer Recovery, VI.15
•    San Nicolas, Ronald John. Promotion of Social Justice and Recovery Oriented Systems of Care in a Mental Health Setting, X.2
•    Spandl, Stephanie. Emerging Global Ethics Speak to Social Justice, X.4
•    Spandl, Stephanie and Kaiser, Tamara. Client Assessment: Including the Social Justice Principles, VIII.10
•    Spandl, Stephanie and Kaiser, Tamara. Working with Culturally Diverse Clients: A Reflective Essay, VIII.11
•    Spandl, Stephanie and Roseborough, David. Mental Illness and Human Dignity: The Subjective Experience, VII.10
•    Thornton, Serene and Brenden, Mary Ann. “Big Momma”: Through the Lens of Justice Principles, VII.6
•    Toft, Jessica. Intersection of Differing Ethical Frameworks and Complex Social Issues, VI.6
•    Valandra. Essay: Letter on Oppression, VIII.12
•    Weuste, Micheal. Begging: Lessons and the History of Charity in the 13th Century, VI.24
•    Weuste, Micheal. Peace not War: A Perspective of Values Regarding War from 13th Century St. Francis, Dorothy Day, the Catholic Workers Movement, and N.A.S.W., VI.22
•    White, Joyce Z. Social Work, Social Justice and Native Americans, VI.17
•    Yoakam, John R. “Incorporating Catholic Social Teachings in Courses with a Focus on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Individuals and Their Families,” VI.18
Allen, James. Catholic Social Teaching and Peacemaking Practice, X.6
•    Baker, Parris J. Gannon University’s Annual Social Work Club Christmas Dinner and Wellness Fair Collaborating for Justice through Partnership: Engaging Community Partnership with Agencies, Parishes and International Entities, X.10
•    Behrman, Gary. Introducing Students to Catholic Social Teaching through the Legacy and Mission of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, VIII.22
•    Blythe, Betty andLee, Othelia, et al. Can You Call It Racism?: An Organizational Case Study and Role Play Approach, VII.7
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Being Poor without Resources: A Reflective Essay on Visiting the “Welfare” Office, VI.14
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Catholic Social Teaching: A Social Justice Lens for Social Work, IX.7
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Edward R. Murrow’s Harvest of Shame: Through the Lens of Justice Principles, VI.12
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Examining Racism: Society and Self. A Reflective Essay on my Experiences Related to Racial Diversity Using the Video “Crash,”  IX.30
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Field of Social Work Practice: Student Presentations, VIII.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. My Ideological Perspective and Personal Values: What are They and How Do They ‘Line Up’ with Social Work? VI.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. My Values and Catholic Social Teaching: How Do They Line Up? XI.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social and Economic Disparity: Using the Justice Principles to Understand Local/Regional Disparity/Prosperity, VI.11
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Justice from the Perspective of Diverse Religions, IX.9
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Policy Analysis from a Justice Perspective, VI.9
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Work for Social Justice: PowerPoint Presentation, IX.1
•    Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Work Values/Ethics and Catholic Social Teaching: How Do They Line Up? IX.8
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and McPartlin, Theresa. NASW Policy Statements: Policy Analysis and Advocacy for Change, VI.8
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and Miller, Amata. Developing a Personal Social Justice Credo,VIII.4
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and Miller, Amata. Social Activists Working for Social Justice, VI.2
•    Brenden, Mary Ann and Thornton, Serene. “Big Momma”: Through the Lens of Justice Principles, VII.6
•    Deines, Helen. Applying A Catholic Framework for Economic Life: Outsourcing Eligibility, IX.21
•    Deines, Helen. Brown Bagging: Follow-Up Discussion to EJFA Introduction, IX.16
•    Deines, Helen. Considering Economic Justice for All as a Curriculum Resource, IX.12
•    Deines, Helen. Does Economic Life Support the Common Good? The Case of the GI Bill, IX.25
•    Deines, Helen. How Are the Poor and Vulnerable Faring in the Midst of Charity and Justice?  IX.26
•    Deines, Helen. How Do Diverse Faith Traditions Speak about Economic Justice? IX.17
•    Deines, Helen. How EJFA Became A Catholic Framework for Economic Life, IX.19
•    Deines, Helen. Introducing Economic Justice for All as a Resource for Social Work, IX.14
•    Deines, Helen. Learning from Our Clothes: A Global Perspective on Economic Justice, IX.27
•    Deines, Helen. The Myth of the Level Playing Field: Experiencing “Social & Economic Justice,” IX.22
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Film Critique: Social Justice and Human Rights, IX.31
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Literature Review: Social Work Empowerment, Social Justice, Human Rights, and Catholic Social Teaching, IX.33
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Social Justice Principles of Catholic Social Teachings and Ethical Preferences for Empowerment Social Work, VIII.2
•    DuBois, Brenda and Miley, Karla. Volunteer Experience: Two Feet of Social Ministry, IX.11
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Doing versus Being, VIII.30
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Individual Change versus Social Change? VI.20
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Self Reflection Paper, VIII.15
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Self Reflection, Passion, Mission, VI.3
•    Epple, Dorothea Marie. Why Care for the Stranger? VI.21
•    Ferguson, Sarah. Policy Analysis from Two Perspectives: A Social Justice Framework and a Policy Science Framework, VI.7
•    Gallegos, Joseph. Learning Module: Integrating Catholic Social Teachings in a Social Work Curriculum, IX.40
•    Gilsenan, Tom. Saints for Social Work, IX.41
•    Kaiser, Tamara and Spandl, Stephanie. Client Assessment: Including the Social Justice Principles, VIII.10
•    Kaiser, Tamara and Spandl, Stephanie. Working with Culturally Diverse Clients: A Reflective Essay, VIII.11
•    Kardos, Linda. Action Project and Synthesis Paper, VIII.9
•    Kelly, Michael and Pryce, Julia, et al. The Influence of Personal Background: A Theory-Driven Assessment, VII.1
•    Kelly, Michael and Pryce, Julia, et al. Learning Module: Classroom Tools and Ideas, IX.39
•    Kelly, Michael and Pryce, Julia, et al. Operationalizing Social Justice in Social Work Curriculum Content: “Preferential Options for the Poor,” VIII.24
•    Kominkiewicz, Frances Bernard. Strengthening Social Justice Values and Ethics Through Development of Student’s Initial Mission Statement, VII.5
•    Larkin, Shelagh. Spiritually Sensitive Professional Development of Self in Field Education: An Ignatian Approach, VIII.28
•    Lee, Othelia and Blythe, Betty, et al. Can You Call It Racism?: An Organizational Case Study and Role Play Approach, VII.7
•    Lightburn, Anita and Lindquist, Dale. Module on Conference Development to Further the Social Justice Mission of a University Institute, X.4
•    Lindquist, Dale and Lightburn, Anita. Module on Conference Development to Further the Social Justice Mission of a University Institute, X.4
•    Long, Pamela. Understanding Social Work as an International Human Rights Profession, XI.1
•    Lucas-Darby, Emma T. Integrating Catholic Social Teaching into Macro Social Work Practice, VIII.7
•    McPartlin, Theresa. Community Embeddedness: Pathways to Pursue Justice in Social Service Settings, VIII.6
•    McPartlin, Theresa and Brenden, Mary Ann. NASW Policy Statements: Policy Analysis and Advocacy for Change, VI.8
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Film Critique: Social Justice and Human Rights, IX.31
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Literature Review: Social Work Empowerment, Social Justice, Human Rights, and Catholic Social Teaching, IX.33
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Social Justice Principles of Catholic Social Teachings and Ethical Preferences for Empowerment Social Work, VIII.2
•    Miley, Karla and DuBois, Brenda. Volunteer Experience: Two Feet of Social Ministry, IX.11
•    Miller, Amata and Brenden, Mary Ann. Developing a Personal Social Justice Credo, VIII.4
•    Miller, Amata and Brenden, Mary Ann. Social Activists Working for Social Justice, VI.2
•    Nelson, Sheila. The Modern Family – Public Families and Private Families: Do Same-Sex Families Qualify as Real Families? VI.19
•    Nordstrom, Jennifer. Community Social Work, X.1
•    Nordstrom, Jennifer. International Social Work, XI.3
•    Pryce, Julia and Kelly, Michael, et al. The Influence of Personal Background: A Theory-Driven Assessment, VII.1
•    Pryce, Julia and Kelly, Michael, et al. Learning Module: Classroom Tools and Ideas, IX.39
•    Pryce, Julia and Kelly, Michael, et al. Operationalizing Social Justice in Social Work Curriculum Content: “Preferential Options for the Poor,” VIII.24
•    Roseborough, David and Spandl, Stephanie. Mental Illness and Human Dignity: The Subjective Experience, VII.10
•    Rottenberg, Rochelle. A Matching Program between Students Learning about Older Adults and Elders from Diverse Communities, VIII.20
•    San Nicolas, Ronald John. Mental Health Policy and Consumer Recovery, VI.15
•    San Nicolas, Ronald John. Promotion of Social Justice and Recovery Oriented Systems of Care in a Mental Health Setting, X.2
•    Spandl, Stephanie. Emerging Global Ethics Speak to Social Justice, X.4
•    Spandl, Stephanie and Kaiser, Tamara. Client Assessment: Including the Social Justice Principles, VIII.10
•    Spandl, Stephanie and Kaiser, Tamara. Working with Culturally Diverse Clients: A Reflective Essay, VIII.11
•    Spandl, Stephanie and Roseborough, David. Mental Illness and Human Dignity: The Subjective Experience, VII.10
•    Thornton, Serene and Brenden, Mary Ann. “Big Momma”: Through the Lens of Justice Principles, VII.6
•    Toft, Jessica. Intersection of Differing Ethical Frameworks and Complex Social Issues, VI.6
•    Valandra. Essay: Letter on Oppression, VIII.12
•    Weuste, Micheal. Begging: Lessons and the History of Charity in the 13th Century, VI.24
•    Weuste, Micheal. Peace not War: A Perspective of Values Regarding War from 13th Century St. Francis, Dorothy Day, the Catholic Workers Movement, and N.A.S.W., VI.22
•    White, Joyce Z. Social Work, Social Justice and Native Americans, VI.17
•    Yoakam, John R. “Incorporating Catholic Social Teachings in Courses with a Focus on Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgender Individuals and Their Families,” VI.18


~Acknowledgements~

This Resource Guide and the project from which it emerges would not have been possible
without the contributions and support of the following:

•    Faculty in social work education programs in Catholic-sponsored colleges and universities across the United States and beyond for: sharing the products of their talented, heartfelt and passion-driven efforts to uncloak the ‘best kept secret’ of Catholicism; putting Catholic Social Teaching into action in the classroom and the community; and, stepping up to the plate to embrace the challenges of ‘teaching to mission’… the missions of both the social work profession and our Catholic sponsors.

•    Faculty of the School of Social Work, St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas, for their endurance and persistence as we have struggled through the challenges inherent in the pursuit of justice; and for their continuing efforts to embrace complexity, ask tough questions and work collaboratively for justice in our school, our institutions, our profession and our world.

•    Stephanie Spandl SSND, research associate, for her dedication to social justice which motivated her painstaking efforts to provide consistency and quality across the instructional modules and assistance and encouragement in polishing drafts, thus ensuring for a patina in the final product… no small chore with twenty-five plus writers!

•    Members of the Social Work for Social Justice Advisory Committee for their undaunted dedication to the promise of Catholic Social Teaching and their unflagging confidence and enthusiasm in us and the work of this project… warm gratitude to Rev. Stephen Adrian, Catherine McNamee CSJ, Amata Miller IHM, Susie Morgan, Mary O’Brien, Brian Rusche, Katarina Schuth OSF, and Kathy Tomlin.

•    The Myser Initiative on Catholic Identity, St. Catherine University, and Beyond Career to Calling, University of St. Thomas, for their generous support which made this resource guide and the conference possible, moving them from mere possibilities to realities with which to be reckoned.

•    President Andrea J. Lee IHM, St. Catherine University, and President Dennis Dease, University of St. Thomas, for recognizing the value of this initiative, supporting its progress and promoting it to audiences near and far.

•    Lora Horan-Kimsal and Susie Morgan, research assistants, for their willingness to add tasks to their already-full-graduate-student lives and ability to complete numerous not-so-small tasks that made a big difference.

•    Barbara Shank, dean of the St. Catherine University/University of St. Thomas School of Social Work, for conceiving of this project and remaining true to it through thick and thin.