The University of St. Thomas

School of Social Work

Michael G. Chovanec

Michael G. Chovanec

Michael G. Chovanec

Associate Professor

mgchovanec@stkate.edu
Phone: (651) 690-8722

F-15
2004 Randolph Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55105

Office Location: 300 Fontbonne Hall - SCU


Courses taught in Spring 2014 at UST
GRSW 604-06
20867
Meth of Clinical Social Wk II 1920-2145 T SCB 326

3 Credit Hours

This course is part two of a year-long sequence requiring students to keep the same instructor over the academic year. This course provides an overview of theories and intervention methods for social work practice. It is a continuation of GRSW 603. This course focuses on the clinical interview, both with regard to the philosophy and theoretical constructs of the approaches and to the application of those approaches in work with clients from various ages, cultural and ethnic and class backgrounds. Emphasis is placed on differential aspects of assessment and diagnosis of different age groups throughout the lifespan, the formulation of a treatment plan, the therapeutic relationship and the process of treatment. Emphasis is placed on theories and methods of practice with individuals and groups. This course is taken concurrently with GRSW 608.

GRSW 645-05
22222
Psychopathology & Hum Behavior 1215-2115 F SCB 325

3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the dynamics of psychopathology in human behavior. Through the identification of the biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual variables influencing behavior, students gain a theoretical foundation for understanding and assessing psychopathology. The impact of diversity, social justice and ageism on behavior and the experience of mental illness will be explored. Special emphasis in this course is on the complexity of psychopathology and the use and practical limitations of diagnostic systems, especially DSM-IV-TR.

GRSW 645-05
22222
Psychopathology & Hum Behavior 1215-2115 F SCB 325

3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the dynamics of psychopathology in human behavior. Through the identification of the biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual variables influencing behavior, students gain a theoretical foundation for understanding and assessing psychopathology. The impact of diversity, social justice and ageism on behavior and the experience of mental illness will be explored. Special emphasis in this course is on the complexity of psychopathology and the use and practical limitations of diagnostic systems, especially DSM-IV-TR.

GRSW 645-05
22222
Psychopathology & Hum Behavior 1215-2115 F SCB 325

3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the dynamics of psychopathology in human behavior. Through the identification of the biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual variables influencing behavior, students gain a theoretical foundation for understanding and assessing psychopathology. The impact of diversity, social justice and ageism on behavior and the experience of mental illness will be explored. Special emphasis in this course is on the complexity of psychopathology and the use and practical limitations of diagnostic systems, especially DSM-IV-TR.

GRSW 645-05
22222
Psychopathology & Hum Behavior 1215-2115 F SCB 325

3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the dynamics of psychopathology in human behavior. Through the identification of the biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual variables influencing behavior, students gain a theoretical foundation for understanding and assessing psychopathology. The impact of diversity, social justice and ageism on behavior and the experience of mental illness will be explored. Special emphasis in this course is on the complexity of psychopathology and the use and practical limitations of diagnostic systems, especially DSM-IV-TR.

GRSW 645C-04
22221
Psychopathology & Hum Behavior 1920-2145 M FBH 108

3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the dynamics of the psychopathology in human behavior. Through the identification of the biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual variables influencing behavior, students gain a theoretical foundation for understanding and assessing psychopathology. The impact of diversity, social justice and ageism on behavior and the experience of mental illness will be explored. Special emphasis in this course is on the complexity of psychopathology and the use and practical limitations of diagnostic systems, especially DSM-IV-TR.

GRSW 682-02
20178
Applied Research Seminar 1920-2145 R SCB 206

0 Credit Hours

Candidates for the MSW degree must satisfactorily conduct a clinical research project, present the findings, and complete a final written and bound report. The purpose of the clinical research project is to provide the student with an opportunity to independently conceptualize a research problem, formulate a research design, implement the research, analyze the data, address ethical and cultural considerations, and disseminate the findings. The project is a logical extension of required research courses (GRSW 580 and GRSW 681) and requires application, integration, and further development of previously acquired skills and knowledge. The research must be relevant to clinical social work practice. The project must demonstrate an original and clear contribution to the body of social work knowledge in the student's selected area of focus. It should demonstrate the student's ability to integrate social work theory with research findings.

Courses taught in Summer 2014 at UST
GRSW 645-01
30296
Psychopathology & Hum Behavior 1600-1900 T R SCB 324

3 Credit Hours

This course will explore the dynamics of psychopathology in human behavior. Through the identification of the biological, psychological, sociological and spiritual variables influencing behavior, students gain a theoretical foundation for understanding and assessing psychopathology. The impact of diversity, social justice and ageism on behavior and the experience of mental illness will be explored. Special emphasis in this course is on the complexity of psychopathology and the use and practical limitations of diagnostic systems, especially DSM-IV-TR.

Courses taught in Fall 2014 at UST
GRSW 540-20
42441
Human Behav & Soc Environment 1215-2115 F SCB 206

3 Credit Hours

This foundation course will explore the dynamics of human behavior and prepare a foundation of knowledge on which to build clinical practice skills. Through a study of systems theory, psychodynamic theory and the identification of the biological, psychological and sociological variables influencing development, students will gain a theoretical base for application to the assessment of client systems. Special emphasis in the course is on the important factors of human diversity (ethnic minorities of color, racism, enthnocentrism, aging, sexism, sexual orientation, and religion/spirituality) as they affect the dynamics of human behavior.

GRSW 540-20
42441
Human Behav & Soc Environment 1215-2115 F SCB 206

3 Credit Hours

This foundation course will explore the dynamics of human behavior and prepare a foundation of knowledge on which to build clinical practice skills. Through a study of systems theory, psychodynamic theory and the identification of the biological, psychological and sociological variables influencing development, students will gain a theoretical base for application to the assessment of client systems. Special emphasis in the course is on the important factors of human diversity (ethnic minorities of color, racism, enthnocentrism, aging, sexism, sexual orientation, and religion/spirituality) as they affect the dynamics of human behavior.

GRSW 540-20
42441
Human Behav & Soc Environment 1215-2115 F SCB 206

3 Credit Hours

This foundation course will explore the dynamics of human behavior and prepare a foundation of knowledge on which to build clinical practice skills. Through a study of systems theory, psychodynamic theory and the identification of the biological, psychological and sociological variables influencing development, students will gain a theoretical base for application to the assessment of client systems. Special emphasis in the course is on the important factors of human diversity (ethnic minorities of color, racism, enthnocentrism, aging, sexism, sexual orientation, and religion/spirituality) as they affect the dynamics of human behavior.

GRSW 540-20
42441
Human Behav & Soc Environment 1215-2115 F SCB 206

3 Credit Hours

This foundation course will explore the dynamics of human behavior and prepare a foundation of knowledge on which to build clinical practice skills. Through a study of systems theory, psychodynamic theory and the identification of the biological, psychological and sociological variables influencing development, students will gain a theoretical base for application to the assessment of client systems. Special emphasis in the course is on the important factors of human diversity (ethnic minorities of color, racism, enthnocentrism, aging, sexism, sexual orientation, and religion/spirituality) as they affect the dynamics of human behavior.

GRSW 603-06
40980
Meth of Clinical Social Work I 1920-2145 T SCB 326

3 Credit Hours

This course is part one of a year-long sequence requiring students to keep the same instructor over the academic year. This course provides an overview of theories and intervention methods for social work practice. The course focuses on the clinical interview, both with regard to the philosophy and theoretical constructs of the approaches and to the application of those approaches in work with clients from various cultural, ethnic and class backgrounds. Emphasis is placed on differential aspects of assessment and diagnosis of clients of all ages, the formulation of a treatment plan, the therapeutic relationship and the process of treatment. This course is taken concurrently with GRSW 607.

GRSW 682-02
40194
Applied Research Seminar 1920-2145 R SCB 206

4 Credit Hours

Candidates for the MSW degree must satisfactorily conduct a clinical research project, present the findings, and complete a final written and bound report. The purpose of the clinical research project is to provide the student with an opportunity to independently conceptualize a research problem, formulate a research design, implement the research, analyze the data, address ethical and cultural considerations, and disseminate the findings. The project is a logical extension of required research courses (GRSW 580 and GRSW 681) and requires application, integration, and further development of previously acquired skills and knowledge. The research must be relevant to clinical social work practice. The project must demonstrate an original and clear contribution to the body of social work knowledge in the student's selected area of focus. It should demonstrate the student's ability to integrate social work theory with research findings.

Committees and positions:

  • ·         Practice Content Committee, Chair

    ·         Faculty Tenure Committee, member

    ·         Group work Institute, member

    ·         MSW Program Committee, member

    ·         SCU / Faculty Personnel Committee, Elected as Alternate

    ·         SCU / School of Professional Studies / Annual Speaker Event Committee, co-chair

Courses taught:

  • ·         GRSW 645: Psychopathology and Human Behavior

    ·         GRSW 540: Human Behavior and the Social Environment

    ·         GRSW 603 &604: Methods of Clinical Social Work

    ·         GRSW 682: Applied Research Seminar

Current research interests:

  • Domestic abuse treatment/assessment
  • Social work practice
  • Application of Reactance Theory to social work practice
  • Work with Involuntary Groups

Academic experience:

  • B.S.W., M.S.W., University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Ph.D., University of Minnesota

Practice experience:

  • Domestic abuse treatment group facilitator (13, yrs.)- Currently
  • Marriage and family therapist (19 yrs.)
  • Adult mental health case management (11 yrs.)
  • Adult mental health day treatment coordinator (2 yrs.)

Publications:

  • ·         Chovanec, M. (2010).  Innovations in Group Work with Abusive Men: Theories that Promote Engagement and Empowerment in Creating Connnections: Celebrating the Power of Groups, 25th Annual International Symposium on Social Work with Groups, Boston, MA.  Whiting & Birch Ltd : London, England.  .

    ·         Chovanec, M.G. (in press).  Engaging Abusive Men in the Change Process: Facilitators’ Perspectives in Groups: Gateways to Growth, 29th International Symposium on Social Work with Groups, Jersey City, New Jersey.  Whiting & Birch Ltd : London, England. (Manuscript accepted 6/28/09)

    ·         Chovanec, M.G. (2009).  Facilitating Change in Group Work with Abusive Men: Examining Stages of Change.  Social Work with Groups.  Taylor and Francis

    ·         Chovanec, M. (2009).  You Can’t Make Us Change: Use of Stages of Change in Involuntary Group Development.  Encyclopedia of Social Work with Groups,  Gitterman A. and Salmon, R., (Eds.) New York: Rouitledge

    ·         Chovanec, M. (2009).  Work with Men in Domestic Abuse Treatment.  In Strategies for Work with Involuntary Clients (2nd Ed.).  New York: Columbia University Press.

    ·         Chovanec, M (2008).  Transforming Men Who Batter into Men Who Matter.  In Reflections: Narratives of Professional Helping.  The CSULB University Press. 14(2), 47-56.

    ·         Chovanec, M. (2008).  Innovations Applied to the Classroom for Involuntary Groups: Implications for Social Work Education.  In Journal of Teaching in Social Work.  The Haworth Press, Inc.  28(1/2), 209-225.

    ·         Rooney, R. and Chovanec, M. (2004).  Involuntary Groups (Chapter 12).  In Handbook of Social Work with Groups, C.D. Garvin, M.J. Galinsky and L.M. Gutierrez, Editors,  Guilford Publications, Inc., pp. 212-225.

    ·         Chovanec, Michael (2002).  My Domestic Violence Treatment Group: Challenging Stereotypes of Abusive Men in the Classroom.  BPD Update (The Association of Baccalaureate Social Work Program Directors, Inc., 25(1), 17-18.

    ·         Chovanec, Michael G. (1995, November). Attrition in the treatment of men who batter: A closer look at men's decision-making process about attending or dropping out of treatment. Proceedings of the Eighth National Symposium on Doctoral Research in Social Work. Symposium conducted at The Ohio State University College of Social Work.

    ·         Chovanec, Michael G. (1995). Attrition in the treatment of men who batter: A closer look at men's decision-making process about attending or dropping out of treatment. Dissertation Abstracts International and Social Work Abstracts. (University Microfilms No. 9534112).

     

Association memberships and affiliations:

  • NASW-- Member from 1981 to present
  • American Association of Marriage and Family Therapy-- Clinical membership from 1986 to present
  • Association for the Advancement of Social Work Groups, Inc.; member since 1997
  • Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist (LMFT)-- 9/15/89
  • Licensed Independent Clinical Social Worker (LICSW) -10/97
  • Council on Social Work Education, Minnesota Chapter, Secretary; member since 1992