Civic Engagement Courses

 

Civic engagement, formerly known as service-learning, incorporates meaningful community partnership into coursework, allowing the students to contribute to the community while gaining relevant knowledge to their academic and professional lives. It is a link between the classroom and community through required, academic experiences.

These courses at the University of St. Thomas are offered from various colleges and disciplines to engage students, faculty, and community partners in relation to poverty alleviation, educational access, equitable access to health care, rights of workers, access to food and affordable housing, environmental sustainability, and more. Courses with civic engagement are academically rigorous and offer students opportunities to link theory and practice through structured public service activities in collaboration with local communities. Students gain further understanding and appreciation of the discipline, while achieving an enhanced sense of civic responsibility.

Current Courses

Spring 2015 Service-Learning Courses

COJO 472: Family Communication; Dr. Carol Bruess

This course is an examination of communication dynamics within the family system. Patterns of interaction, message exchange, developmental stages, and satisfaction and stability will be explored in light of today's ever-changing family structure. Focus will include traditional (nuclear) and non- traditional family types.  Students will conduct oral histories with elder UST alums of the old guard, writing an oral history of the elder's life and then giving it to that person and his/her family as a gift. Students also work with Cristo Rey Jesuit High School and Carondalet Village.

MGMT 482: Leading Organizational Systems; Dr. Erica Diehn

This course explores the theories, concepts, and skills involved in exercising effective leadership and management from both organizational and individual perspectives. The course covers the concepts of leadership in diverse cultures, how organizational conditions affect competent, ethical leadership, and the actual work of management in organizations today. There is a service learning component embedded in this course: you will immediately put your leadership and course learning into action and reflect on this experience, enhancing your overall personal leadership development.  This course examines the complexity of business leadership through a review of the key theories of leadership and their managerial applications.

PSYC 428: Theories of Counseling & Psychotherapy; Dr. Lauren Braswell

Students learned key theories in counseling and psychotherapy, explored the evidence base for psychotherapy approaches with specific issues, and practiced counseling pre-skills via in-class experiential exercises and service-learning activities on the behavioral health units of a local hospital, Regions Hospital. Based on their own preferences, students were able to participate in diagnosis education, wellness & stress management, music therapy, and/or occupational therapy groups. Students were required to complete a goal-setting meeting and complete electronic journal entries about all Regions contacts.  Observations and questions about the service-learning experience were shared during class discussion and integrated with course materials and tests.

SOCI 210: Research Methods in Sociology; Dr. Lisa Waldner

This is a research methods course that provides students a “hands-on” experience where they have access to the same tools that researchers use.  Rather than listening and taking notes, student’s take an active role in their learning.  To make this experience more relevant, the course works with The Family Partnership, social service agency that supports families in need, on a research project needed to assess their programs or answer questions they may have about how clients perceive their services.

SOCI 220: Sociological Analysis; Dr. Lisa Waldner

This course develops students’ critical thinking skills by developing skills to become better consumers of statistical information. It applies some basic statistical concepts to social science questions and teaches an understanding of the link between the application of statistics and research methodology. Working with clients such as the non-profit Family Partnership, a real data analysis project is completed using data from a prior research methods class

ENVR 401: Field Seminar; Dr. Maria Dahmus

This course is the culmination of the major for environmental studies. This course partnered with ESCI 310: Environmental Problem Solving taught by Dr. Small, and community partners: Como Active Citizen Network, St. Paul Parks and Recreation, the Capitol Region Watershed District, and a local artist to explore the ecological, social, and political feasibility of using hydroponic gardens to remove excess nutrients from urban lakes with a focus on Como Lake and created public outreach projects designed to raise public awareness of initiatives in the Como Lake watershed.

ESCI 310: Environmental Problem Solving; Dr. Chip Small

This course explored methods of solving environmental problems through an interdisciplinary lens and partnered with ENVR 401: Field Seminar taught by Dr. Maria Dahmus and community partners: Como Active Citizen Network, St. Paul Parks and Recreation, the Capitol Region Watershed District, and a local artist. The focus was a series of projects related to urban lake nutrient management using a systems thinking approach, emphasizing date synthesis and analysis and the communication of results to a variety of different audiences.  

PHIL 215: Introductory Ethics; Dr. Heidi Giebel

Students developed philosophical reading and speaking skills to think analytically, reflectively and creatively about important ethical issues to become more aware of ethically relevant aspects of your own life. This course worked with Feed My Starving Children to engage students in service-learning.

THEO 431: Women in the Early Church; Dr. Susan Myers

Students will work with local women’s organizations to compare the situations of modern women with those of ancient women about whom they read. Students will also reflect on the ways in which women—both ancient and modern—are empowered and silenced. This course is also a Women’s Studies course. Students worked with one of two community partners that serve women and their children, and reflected on how social forces strengthen these women or inhibit their well-being.

WMST 205: Foundations of Women’s Studies; Dr. Susan Myers

This course is the introduction to Women’s Studies, and employs an interdisciplinary approach to analyze women’s experiences and studies the ways that sex and gender manifest themselves in social, cultural, and political contexts. Students worked on at least three occasions with Women’s Advocates, a local domestic-violence shelter. The service-learning aspect of the course will provide students with a means of engaging in activism to improve the lives of women and with a means to integrate this activism with intellectual reflection on the empowerment of women.

J-Term 2015 Service-Learning Courses

COJO 398U: Culture and Communication in Post-Apartheid South Africa; Dr. Kevin Sauter & Dr. Emily Sauter

This J-Term study abroad course in South Africa explored the roots of apartheid and the transition the country experienced in the transition towards a democratic government in the 1990s. It also looked at the cultural dimensions of several of the prominent ethnic groups in South Africa and examined the role that communication strategies and practices play in maintaining civic stability and enhancing interpersonal relationships in the post-apartheid era. The course included a two-day community-based service-learning experience at the Christel House School in Langer township in Cape Town. To understand the future of South Africa it is important to spend time with the young people who will eventually control the destiny of the country and this experience provides the American students with a chance to interact with South African youth for an extended time.

CPSY 680: Diversity Issues in Counseling in Singapore; Dr. Len Jennings & Prof. Karrie Jennings

This J-Term study abroad course will explore fundamental issues concerning the practice of providing counseling for people from different cultural, ethnic, racial, and national backgrounds, as well as those who have been marginalized in some way. In this special edition of the course, students will travel to and live in the highly diverse country of Singapore.  An immersion experience such as this will give students first-hand, lived experience in a country that embraces diversity and has significant expertise in multicultural counseling. This course is designated as a service-learning course and will involve community service in Singapore.  We will provide psychoeducational programming to DaySpring Residential Treatment Centre.

JPST 250: Intro to Justice and Peace Studies; Dr. Mike Klein

This course offers an introduction to the study of major aspects of world and local conflict including theories of social science relating to conflict, violence and the meaning of justice.  Among the aspects of conflict studied will be cultural differences, environmental perspectives, international trade, the arms race, and oppression. Proposed solutions are examined in the context of social injustice and the need for systemic change.  Students do a guided research paper on justice and peace in the context of a particular country, examining the historical roots of present injustice and conflict, human rights, media representation, and possible future steps. In January we have the unique opportunity to learn alongside people who are immigrants, refugees and asylees who have experienced injustice and oppression in their country of origin. Local immersion experiences will take place through three evening trips to Baker Community Center to participate in Jane Addams School for Democracy learning circles. 

THEO 489: AIDS, Apartheid, and the Arts of Resistance: Theological Reflection in South Africa; Dr. Kimberly Vrundy & Father Richard Cogill

This J-Term study abroad course analyzed works of artistic resistance to examine the interrelationships between two catastrophes of the modern era in South Africa: Apartheid and AIDS, especially attentive to the impact of the correlation between the two on the lives of women. Service-Learning was a key element of the course, with students spending a day at the Central Methodist Mission in Johannesburg, which is an urban shelter for the homeless. Students worked a shift at the Scalabrini Center’s program to welcome refugees and asylum seekers to urban Cape Town; and they shadowed community health workers in the townships outside of Cape Town through the St. Luke’s hospice program. 

Fall 2014 Service-Learning Courses

COJO 276: Argumentation and Advocacy; Dr. Bernard Armada

This course was designed to help the students become better authors and consumers of arguments in their everyday life by sharpening critical thinking skills through the course objectives. These objectives included examining and improving upon: written, spoken, and mass mediated messages. Objectives were developed through participating in debates and writing an argumentative advocacy letter about HIV/AIDS. This service-learning course allowed students to apply what they learned outside of the course through an advocacy letter that was addressed to a legislator or newspaper about HIV/AIDS.

THEO 215.02: Christian Morality; Dr. Bernard Brady

This course introduced principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics through morality, Christian tradition, community, culture, and relation of spirituality to the Christian moral life. Through these topics, students had a clearer understanding and commitment to personal values and how to analyze arguments and other points of view. This course was a service-learning course that partnered with Dorothy Day, a Catholic charity center. Dorothy Day provides meals, mental and medical health services, showers, and shelter for more than 200 people experiencing homelessness. This course worked the emergency shelter in the evenings, multiple times during the semester to learn about community and morality.

THEO 215.41 Christian Morality; Dr. Bernard Brady

This course is an honors class that introduces principles, methods, and topics of Christian theological ethics. It addresses the relation of Christian faith to moral reflection and decision making – both individual and social, Christian tradition, nature and function of community, critique and transformation of culture, and spirituality to the Christian life. Through these objectives, the students had a clearer understanding and commitment to personal values. This course was a service-learning course that partnered with Dorothy Day, a Catholic charity center. Dorothy Day provides meals, mental and medical health services, showers, and shelter for more than 200 people experiencing homelessness. This course worked the emergency shelter in the evenings, multiple times during the semester to learn about community and morality.

COJO 472: Family Communication; Dr. Carol Bruess

The course focused on understanding how we develop, maintain, manage, and/or disturb family relationships through communication. The course studied classic theories, models, and research in family communication and how it affects family interaction. Part of the class was a service-learning project where students interviewed and wrote an oral history of a senior citizen in the community about his or her family life and analyzed the family life described through the principles and topics learned in the class.

MGMT 382: Leadership & Management; Dr. Erica Diehn

The course explored theories, concepts, and skills involved in exercising effective leadership and management in organizational and individual arenas. The course covered leadership in diverse cultures, and how organizational conditions affect ethical leadership. As a service-learning course, they partnered with the Women at the Well International, a non-profit organization that provides assistance for refugees in Ethiopia. By working with their partner, the goal for students was to learn more about diverse cultures and apply what they had been taught in the area of leadership through service-learning, all while improving upon their leadership skills.

BIOL 497: The Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases; Dr. Jill Manske

The course concentrated on the evolutionary and ecological drives of disease emergences and the effect of these diseases on human health. Themes were also brought up on how to use and control diseases and why they succeed or failed. There was a service-learning component, with Open Arms of Minnesota, a nonprofit organization that delivers free meals to those with cancer and diseases. This gave students exposure to an organization that helps those with diseases discussed in class within their own community.

BLAW 301: Legal Environment of Business; John Del Vecchio

The course examined the business law rules and principles of entrepreneurship, finance, management, and marketing. The course focuses included contracts, negligence, products liability and warranty, sales of goods, intellectual property, employment law, as well as general concepts of legal reasoning, legal process, and alternative dispute resolution. A critical objective of the course was to improve their knowledge base regarding the law’s effect on business, and identifying and applying law to legal issues related to business. There was an out of class field education component available to all students in the course, the professor would like to keep the community partner unnamed.

BLAW 354: Marketing Law; John Del Vecchio

The course explored legal principles and government regulation connecting to marketing, advertising, and intellectual property. Themes in the course comprised of patent, trademarks, copyrights and intellectual property law. The critical objective for students was to improve their knowledge base regarding the law’s effect on business and improve their skills in identifying legal issues related to business, applying law to those issues, and analyzing that effect on these issues. The students did this through working with their community partner, who the professor would like to keep unnamed.

SOCI 474: Seminar in Sociology; Dr. Meg Karraker

This course offered graduating students an opportunity to actively reflect upon theory, methodology, and substantive sociological knowledge in this senior capstone experience. Students had the opportunity to integrate these components to assess the role of sociology in understanding sociological problems. The students were required to complete a research project that doubled as their service-learning project with Catholic Charities and drew on their particular interests and their previous sociology coursework. The course also discussed careers, vocation, and preparation for graduate school.

SOCI 220: Sociological Analysis; Dr. Lisa Waldner

This course was centered on methods of data analysis in the career of sociology. Students were introduced to applied statistics, with an emphasis on skill development in the use of data processing used by sociologists in research settings. Students applied what they learned through the course in a real data analysis project by collecting data with a partnership such as the non-profit Family Partnership and other programs at UST.

ENGL 201 Spiritual Writing of the 21st Century; Michael Raimondi

This course examines bodies of literary texts in terms of a discipline other than literary or English studies. The course helps students become better readers, writers and critical thinkers. Ultimately, the students developed confidence in their writing, recognize the writing tools they already had, enjoyed the literature they read, and took bold rhetorical chances. The course included a service-learning component with College Prep Elementary, a STEM school in St. Paul that focuses on college and career readiness. The students had to work side-by-side with 6th grade students who were also English language learners.

COJO 470: Advertising and Public Relations Campaigns; Paul Omodt

This course was designed for students to apply previously learned strategic communication elements, the emphasis was to learn and apply marketing communication disciplines of research and analysis, planning strategy development, and to build an integrated strategic communication campaign for a real world client organization. The organization the students worked with was either, the Minnesota Independent Schools Form, a non-profit membership organization comprised of independent schools, or Clear Cause, a non-profit organization that has a mission to protect students who travel abroad.

ENGL 300: Writing Theory & Practice; Dr. Susan Callaway

This course was designed for undergraduate and graduate students who have been hired to work in the Center for Writing for the semester. This course provided them with strategies for assisting others in developing their academic literacy. Students were introduced to how writing centers play a role in universities and were challenged as a writer by strengthening their reading and writing abilities using their development of interpersonal communication skills and intercultural competency. The service-learning component included students actively serving as a writing mentor in the community for the Center for Writing.

THEO 431: Women in the Early Church; Dr. Susan Myers

The course introduced students to Christian writings that are by and about women, including those idealizing women and those demonizing women. The course also addressed the methods of modern historical criticism and encouraged students to develop expertise in the application of these methods to texts regarding women. The goals of the course were to develop a framework for understanding these early Christian writings through the examination of religious, political, and social settings out of which the texts arose. Each student was required to participate in a service-learning opportunity at either the Jeremiah Program or Women’s Advocates in Saint Paul. Students constructed a guided journal that contained three entries that reflected upon their experience at their site.

Summer 2014 Service-Learning Courses

BLAW: 301-01 Legal Environment of Business, Dr. John Del Vecchio

An examination of the business law rules and principles of particular relevance to entrepreneurship, finance, management, and marketing. Subjects include contracts, negligence, products liability and warranty, sales of goods, intellectual property, employment law, as well as general notions of legal reasoning and legal process and alternative dispute resolution. Students participate in class phone conference calls, and are offered a field education experience outside of the classroom.

EDLD 869: Leadership in International Contexts of Tanzania, Dr. Jean-Pierre Bongila

This course explores first-hand the challenges that the national, regional and local leaders of Tanzania face as they work to negotiate development in one of the poorest countries in the world.  This course begins with seminars in Minneapolis, then takes you to Tanzania for a two-week immersion, and ends with closure presentations in Minneapolis.  In Tanzania you will exchange insights with national, regional and local leaders who have been instrumental in advancing this developing country and are recognized internationally for their efforts. You will examine and journal about your changing worldview, leadership theories, and general psychosocial and learning theories in this cross-cultural context.  Through immersion in the Tanzanian culture, you will examine the impacts of poverty, AIDS, and lack of healthcare that have resulted in global, national, community, and educational challenges and will meet those instrumental in advocating sustainable change in those arenas. 

CPSY 605: Theories of Career Development Dr. Kate Schaefers

This course focuses on foundations of career theory and application relevant to the counseling psychology professional.  Community partner, Jeremiah Program, is a residential program that helps single mothers pursue advanced degrees.  Students assess the needs of their clients through interviews and career assessment instruments.  Then they recommend next steps for clients as they make career decisions.

CPSY 605: Theories of Career Development, Dr. Kathlene Scholljegerdes

This course focuses on foundations of career theory and application relevant to the counseling psychology professional.  Community partner, Jeremiah Program, is a residential program that helps single mothers pursue advanced degrees.  UST students work in teams to conduct an initial interview with a client, and assess needs and priorities for career counseling; interpret two frequently used career assessment instruments; and synthesize knowledge of client with world of work information, recommending next steps for clients as they make career decisions.

Recent Service-Learning Courses

Spring 2014 Service-Learning Courses

BUSN 200: Business Learning through Service; Dr. Barbara Gorski

This class is required for majors and minors in the Opus College of Business, and students provide 40 hours of non-paid service in a non-profit setting. They engage and become active partners in their communities by making socially beneficial contributions. Students develop their own learning objectives and partner with the community non-profits in order to foster a spirit of service that students take with them into both their professional and personal pursuits.  Just a few of the organizations students have chosen to complete their service projects at are: Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board, Minnesota Department of Natural Resources, Friends of the Orphans, AccountAbility, Minnesota Listening House, Twin Cities RISE!, Second Harvest Heartland, Project for Pride in Living, & Open Arms of Minnesota.

COJO 111: Communication and Citizenship; Drs. Thomas Connery, Kevin Sauter, & Wendy Wyatt

This course focused on theories and principles of communication in all of its forms. The course researched how culture and power emerge in communication. A primary goal for students was to be critically, reflectively, and actively engaged members of their communities. The course partnered with Christo Rey High School, a college-prep school in Minneapolis and is attended by some of the Twin Cities’ most underserved youth. UST students engaged with Christo Rey students 8 times throughout the semester. Through this SL course, the Christo Rey students gained friendships, mentors, role models, and the confidence to go onto college. The UST students became more confident about their communication skills, began to understand how to communicate with diverse populations, and learned how to effectively interact with others.

EDLD 780: Master’s Integrative Seminar; Dr. Jean-Pierre Bongila

This course is the capstone for the Master’s in International Leadership program. The course allows the students to critically reflect on their learning throughout their program and analyze potential career paths in international leadership or global development. The service-learning aspect helped students gain a practical experience and engage in the community by working with one of the following organizations, Feed my Starving Children, Emerge Community Development, AmeriCorps, or KFAI Radio, and reflecting on social and human development that constitute the four underpinnings of the program: education, healthcare, governance, and economy.

ENGL 304: Analytical and Persuasive Writing; Dr. Lucia Pawlowski

This course is intended for the experienced writers and emphasized the theory and practice of writing in analytical, persuasive, and research-based writing as preparation for advanced professional disciplines. Students could choose from working with Domestic Abuse Partnership, Legal Rights Center, Aeon, or the Aliveness Project. The students conducted interviews and wrote profiles for websites and newsletters. They also wrote stories based on the interviews, or for online blogs. Throughout the service-learning component, the students interrogated their own class and privilege, but also gained interpersonal skills by working with the community partners.

ENVR 401: Field Seminar; Dr. Maria Dahmus

This course is the culmination of the major for environmental studies. The course challenged the students to apply what they have learned to investigate a research project for the City of St. Paul, through CityLabs (a community partner that no longer exists). The students conducted their own interviews, analyzed their data, created an exhibit and presented their findings for the city’s stakeholders. Through this service-learning course, the students learned how to conduct a research project, but also how to effectively work with and communicate with a research team and their client.

ESCI 310: Environmental Problem Solving; Dr. Jennifer McGuire

This course explores methods of solving socially relevant environmental problems locally, regionally, and globally. The course focused on the effects on the physical environment, biology, water quality and from various scientific perspectives, but also from perspectives in politics, business, journalism, and law. The students also worked in groups to create a service-learning project with a community partner of their choosing. The project informed and educated non-scientists about an environmental concern which provided critical information to those people who were able to use the information best.

MGMT 382: Leadership & Management; Dr. Erica Diehn

This course explores the theories, concepts, and skills involved in exercising effective leadership and management from both organizational and individual perspectives. The course covers the concepts of leadership in diverse cultures, how organizational conditions affect competent, ethical leadership, and the actual work of management in organizations today. Students work in small groups at one of the following organizations: Chloe’s Fight Foundation, YMCA, Jeremiah’s Hope for Kindness, and the Nicolas Job Foundation.  The service-learning component challenges students to reflect on their experiences and how it enhances their personal leadership development.  This course examines the complexity of business leadership through a review of the key theories of leadership and their managerial applications.

PHED 304: Physical Education Methods: Middle/Secondary; Dr. Tim Mead

This course provides an orientation to the physical education profession pertaining to current trends and research in middle and secondary-level physical education. Factors affecting adolescent and multicultural students will be discussed. Appropriate and effective teaching methods utilizing various teaching pedagogies will be introduced and practiced through peer and clinical site teaching experience including the completion of a service-learning project either assisting Stillwater public schools with fitness testing or judging a science fair at William Byrne Elementary School.

PSYC 428: Theories of Counseling & Psychotherapy; Dr. Lauren Braswell

Students learned key theories in counseling and psychotherapy, explored the evidence base for psychotherapy approaches with specific issues, and practiced counseling pre-skills via in-class experiential exercises and service-learning activities on the behavioral health units of a local hospital, Regions Hospital. Based on their own preferences, students were able to participate in diagnosis education, wellness & stress management, music therapy, and/or occupational therapy groups. Students were required to complete a goal-setting meeting and complete electronic journal entries about all Regions contacts.  Observations and questions about the service-learning experience were shared during class discussion and integrated with course materials and tests.

SOCI 210: Research Methods in Sociology; Dr. Lisa Waldner

This is a research methods course that provides students a “hands-on” experience where they have access to the same tools that researchers use.  Rather than listening and taking notes, student’s take an active role in their learning.  To make this experience more relevant, the course works with The Family Partnership, social service agency that supports families in need, on a research project needed to assess their programs or answer questions they may have about how clients perceive their services.

J-Term 2014 Service-Learning Courses

COJO 398: Hawai’i: Multi-Cultural Communication in Diverse Organizations; Dr. Debra Peterson & Tim Scully.

In Hawai‘i: Multi-Cultural Communication in Diverse Organizations students have the unique opportunity to participate in a community-based partnership with the Ke Kula Ni’ihau O Kekaha Learning Center on Kaua’i. The partnership with Ke Kula Ni’ihau O Kekaha Learning Center will significantly enhance learning. Service-learning and community-based learning is a teaching and learning strategy that “incorporates meaningful community partnerships into coursework, allowing the students to contribute to the community while gaining knowledge relevant to their academic and professional lives.”  In other words, when we take our learning out into the community, we put our skills into practice.  Learning that takes place in the community is essentially another “text” in this course.  In all ways, we are mindful about how good service-learning is reciprocal; our community partners sometimes teach us and other times learn from us.  All involved benefit equally from the work we do together.  We will spend December 31- January 13 on Oahu and January 14- 23 on Kaua‘i, including three partial travel days.  Course activities include: classroom sessions, guest presenters, guided tours, a panel discussion on multi-cultural communication led by UST alumni, and, a service-learning project at a bilingual Hawaiian school.

Fall 2013 Service-Learning Courses

BIOL 497: The Biology of Emerging Infectious Diseases, Dr. Jill Manske

This course focused on emerging infectious diseases from many different perspectives with particular attention to the ways in which human behavior is altering the ecology of infectious disease transmission, thereby promoting their re-emergence as a major global public health threat. This course is a biology seminar and lab, the students completed a research project on Malaria transmission and prevention in Eastern Uganda for West African Medical Missions’ Maysha East: Hope Beyond Medicine African Malaria Project. Students also delivered meals through Open Arms of Minnesota to individuals infected with HIV/AIDS to briefly expose them to a community-based organization that provides outreach to those infected with HIV/AIDS.

COJO 111: Communication & Citizenship; Drs. Thomas Connery, Kevin Sauter, & Wendy Wyatt

This course focused on theories and principles of communication in all its forms. The course researched how culture and power emerge in communication. A primary goal for students was to be critically, reflectively, and actively engaged members of their communities. The course partnered with Cristo Rey Jesuit High School, a college-prep school in Minneapolis and is attended by some of the Twin Cities’ most underserved youth. UST students engaged with Cristo Rey students 8 times throughout the semester. Through this SL course, the Cristo Rey students gained friendships, mentors, role models, and the confidence to go on to college. The UST students became more confident about their communication skills, began to understand how to communicate with diverse populations, and learned how to effectively interact with others.

ENGL 300: Writing Theory & Practice: Peer Consulting in the Center for Writing: Literacy Development in College and the Community; Dr. Susan Callaway

This course was designed for undergraduate and graduate students who have been hired to work in the Center for Writing for the semester. This course provided them with strategies for assisting others in developing their academic literacy. Students were introduced to how writing centers play a role in universities and were challenged as a writer by strengthening their reading and writing abilities using their development of interpersonal communication skills and intercultural competency. The service-learning component included students actively serving as a writing mentor in the community for the Center for Writing.

ENGR 350: Introduction to Electronics; Drs. Steve Albers (Lab), Kundan Nepal (Lecture)

Students developed a background in electricity, electronics, and instrumentation and gained an introduction to electric machines. The course partnered with City Labs and the City of St. Paul to help determine whether or not St. Paul street lamps could be redesigned to fit a more eco-friendly LED option and if these options were effective from a street illumination perspective.

SOCI 220: Sociological Analysis; Dr. Lisa Waldner

This course develops students’ critical thinking skills by developing skills to become better consumers of statistical information. It applies some basic statistical concepts to social science questions and teaches an understanding of the link between the application of statistics and research methodology. Working with clients such as the non-profit Family Partnership, a real data analysis project is completed using data from a prior research methods class.

THEO 429: Women and the Christian Tradition; Dr. Sherry Jordan

This course developed students’ sense of vocation to serve the common good by bringing a theological viewpoint to bear upon significant contemporary social issues such as poverty, war and peace, marriage and family, and social issues related to gender. Students visited the Jeremiah Program three times during the semester to observe and analyze connections between the study of women in the Christian tradition and women at the Jeremiah program, focusing particularly on issues of power and privilege. The Jeremiah Program provides support for single mothers seeking higher education, including affordable housing, life-skills education, empowerment training and early childhood education for their children.