Bruce Gleason - Editor
Graduate Programs in Music Education
University of St. Thomas, St. Paul, Minnesota

Carlos Abril
University of Miami

William Bauer
Case Western Reserve University

Deborah Blair
Oakland University

Beth Bolton
Temple University

Tim Brophy
University of Florida

R. Shayne Cofer
Northeastern Illinois University

Colleen Conway
University of Michigan

Lori Custodero
Columbia University Teachers College

James Daugherty
University of Kansas

Laura Ferguson
Indiana University of Pennsylvania

David Hargreaves
University of Surrey, Roehampton,
Digby Stuart College

David  Hebert
Grieg Academy, Bergen University College

Michael Hewitt
University of Maryland

 

Sondra Wieland Howe
Wayzata, Minnesota

Estelle Jorgensen
Indiana University

Barbara Lewis
University of North Dakota

Herbert Marshall
Baldwin-Wallace College

Kerry Renzoni Filsinger
State University of New York, Buffalo State

Mitchell Robinson
Michigan State University

Fumiko Shiraishi
Iwate University, Iwate, Japan

Katherine Strand
Indiana University

Jill Sullivan
Arizona State University

David Teachout
University of North Carolina, Greensboro

Cecilia Wang
University of Kentucky



Bruce Gleason, Associate Professor of Graduate Music Education at the University of St. Thomas in St. Paul, Minnesota, is the founding editor of Research and Issues in Music Education. He holds a B. A. in music from Crown College, a B.S. and M.A. in music education from the University of Minnesota, and a Ph.D. in music education from the University of Iowa. He has taught all levels of vocal and instrumental music from kindergarten through graduate school, and served as a euphonium and trombone player and vocalist with the 298th U.S. Army Band of the Berlin Brigade from 1989-1991. His research in band and music education history has been published in Music Educators Journal, Journal of Band Research, Renaissance, Winds, TUBA Journal, BDGuide, Bulletin of Historical Research in Music Education, The Irish American Post, and The Journal of the Military Music Society. His work in pedagogy and comprehensive musicianship has been published in Kjos Band News,The Instrumentalist, School Band and Orchestra, and Contributions to Music Education. From 1998 to 2000 he served as a contributing editor for Christianity and the Arts magazine with his column, "Hymns Revisited." His present research focuses on chronicling the tradition of horse-mounted cavalry bands, which has taken him to the United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Austria, Denmark, Sweden and the Sultanate of Oman. He has presented this work for the MENC History Special Research Interest Group, and the Internationale Gesellschaft zur Erforschung und FÖrderung der Blasmusik (IGEB). On weekends, Dr. Gleason can be found singing baritone with the a cappella quartet, The Fairlanes.

Carlos Abril is associate professor and director of undergraduate music education at the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami where he teaches courses in cultural diversity, music in childhood, and philosophy of music education. Prior to this appointment he served as the coordinator of music education and associate professor of music education at Northwestern University. Abril’s research focuses on sociocultural issues in music education, music education policy, curriculum, and music perception. His work has been published in books, research journals, and professional journals. He recently published a chapter in the Handbook of Research on Music Learning (Oxford) and co-edited the book, Musical Experience in Our Lives (Rowman & Littlefield). He serves on various editorial boards including the Journal of Research in Music Education and the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education. Abril received a Ph.D. in music education at The Ohio State University, M.M. in performance at the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, and a B.M. in music education at the University of Miami.

William Bauer is an Associate Professor of music education at Case Western Reserve University where he teaches undergraduate and graduate level classes in music education research, music cognition and learning, instrumental music education, and the applications of technology to music teaching and learning. He served as the Director of Teacher Licensure at Case from 2004-2007. From 1997-2001 Bauer was on the music education faculty of the Ball State University School of Music, where he was also the Co-Director of the Music Technology Resource Laboratory. Previous to his appointment at BSU, Bauer was the Director of Music Education at Radford University in Radford, VA. A native of northeastern Ohio, he taught instrumental (band and orchestra) and general music for eight years in the Ohio public schools.

Bauer's publications include articles in the Journal of Research in Music Education, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, UPDATE: The Applications of Research in Music Education, the Journal of Music Teacher Education, Contributions to Music Education, the Music Educators Journal, the Journal of Technology in Music Learning, the Southeastern Journal of Music Education, TRIAD, the Indiana Musicator, and journals outside of music and music education. He is currently the Editor of Contributions to Music Educationn, the Arts and Humanities Editor of Academic Intersections, and a member of the editorial boards of Research and Issues in Music Education and the American Educational Research Association book series Advances in Music Education Research. In the summer of 2003 Bauer was named an Apple Distinguished Educator by Apple Computer, Inc., and an M-Powered Educator by M-Audio in 2005.

Dr. Bauer has presented at conferences throughout the country and is in demand as an adjudicator and clinician. He is on the National Advisory Board of the Technology Institute for Music Educators (TI:ME) and serves as a member of the Ohio Society for Music Teacher Education Executive Board. Bauer is an active member of many professional organizations including MENC: The National Association for Music Education, the Ohio Music Education Association, the Society for Research in Music Education, the Society for Music Teacher Education, the American Educational Research Association, the College Music Society, the Association for Technology in Music Instruction, and the International Society for Technology in Education. He is a graduate of The Ohio State University (BME), Bowling Green State University (MM), and Kent State University (PhD). His major areas of interest and research include music teacher education, music cognition, and the applications of technology to music teaching and learning. A euphoniumist and trombonist, Dr. Bauer is an active performer with the Sounds of Sousa Band and other professional ensembles. He is also the founder and conductor of the Wadsworth Community Band.

Deborah Blair is Assistant Professor and Coordinator of Undergraduate Music Education at Oakland University, where she teaches educational psychology and music learning, choral music methods, elementary general music methods and supervises student teachers. Dr. Blair also teaches a wide variety of graduate classes during spring and summer sessions. A qualitative researcher, her interests include the application of constructivist learning theory in general music, choral, and special needs classrooms, and the implications of constructivist learning theory for in-service and pre-service teacher education. Dr. Blair's research has been published in the International Journal of Education and the Arts, Mountain Lake Reader, Michigan Music Educator, Music Educators Journal and Visions of Research in Music Education. In addition to her work for RIME, Dr. Blair also serves as reviewer for the International Journal of Education and the Arts. Dr. Blair holds a Bachelor of Arts in Music from Calvin College, a Master of Arts in Choral Conducting from Eastern Illinois University, and a Ph.D. in Music Education from Oakland University.

Beth Bolton is Chair of Music Education and Therapy, Esther Boyer College of Music, Temple University, where she teaches graduate courses in music education and guides graduate research. She holds a Bachelor of Music Education degree from Ft. Hays State University, a Master of Music from Emporia State University, and a Ph.D. from Temple University. Dr. Bolton conducts research in early childhood music development and is a senior author on the Jump Right In: Music Curriculum Series. She also is the author of Music Play, The Childsong Collection 1 and 2, Musicianship, The Early Childhood Song andd Chant Book. Dr. Bolton has presented research and education seminars in Italy, Lithuania, the Dominican Republic, Australia, and New Zealand. This year she will present lectures at several universities in Israel.

Timothy S. Brophy, Assistant Professor of Music Education at the University of Florida, holds a Bachelor of Music Education from the University of Cincinnati College-Conservatory of Music, a Master of Music degree with a concentration in Orff Schulwerk from the University of Memphis, and a Ph.D. in Music Education from the University of Kentucky. He has taught elementary music in both public and private schools in Ohio, Kentucky, Virginia, and Tennessee. As an elementary music teacher, Dr. Brophy was awarded an Ashland Teacher Achievement Award (1996), a Memphis Rotary Club Rotary Award for Teacher Excellence, and was the first elementary music teacher to be honored at the Disney American Teacher Awards in Los Angeles in 1998. Dr. Brophy's public school elementary choirs have appeared in the White House four times and have recorded six albums, including Silver Burdett and Ginn's Celebrate Tennessee! collection (2000)..

An active music education writer and clinician, Dr. Brophy's articles have appeared in the Music Educators Journal, Teaching Music, the Orff Echo, and Tennessee Musician, and Tennessee Teacher. He is author of the book Assessing the Developing Child Musician: A Guide for General Music Teachers (2000, GIA Publications), the book, I've Got to Move! (2002, Warner Bros. Publications) and is an author of the new music textbook series, Music Expressions (Warner Bros. Publications, 2003). Dr Brophy is also active as a clinician at music education conferences, local music education organization chapters, and in school districts around the country and the world.

Known around the world as an assessment specialist in music education, Dr. Brophy has presented his work throughout The United States and in Canada, Europe, Asia, and Australia. His research interests include musical creativity, musical development, and assessment. In 2000, the Council for Research in Music Education recognized his 1998 dissertation, The Melodic Improvisations of Children Ages Six Through Twelve: A Developmental Perspectivee, with an Outstanding Dissertation in Music Education award. His research has been published in Contributions to Music Education, the Southeastern Journal of Music Education, Music Education Research, The Canadian Music Educator, and in numerous Proceedings of national and international symposia and conferences. He also has several papers published on the ERIC database.

Dr. Brophy is active professionally in numerous music education organizations. He has been a member of the editorial boards of the Music Educators Journal, the Orff Echo, and is the Editor of Research Perspectives in Music Education. He is currently Secretary-Treasurer of the Florida Collegiate Music Educators Association, Research Chair for the Florida Music Educators Association (FMEA), and chair of the Florida Music Assessment Task Force.

R. Shayne Cofer, Associate Professor Director of Bands and Chair of the Department of Music and Dance Program at Northeastern Illinois University in Chicago, earned a B.M. degree in music education at The University of Idaho and a M.A. and Ph.D. in music education at The University of Iowa. Prior to teaching at the university level, Dr. Cofer taught K-12 instrumental and vocal music in Northern Idaho. His research has been published in the Journal for Research in Music Education, Southeastern Journal of Music Education, School Band and Orchestra, and MENC's Teaching Music..

Colleen Conway is Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in Music Education at The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. She holds bachelors and masters degrees in horn performance and music education from the Eastman School of Music and a doctorate in music education from Teachers College, Columbia University. Her scholarly interests include instrumental music education, preservice music teacher education, qualitative research, professional development for the inservice music teacher, and the mentoring and induction of beginning music teachers. She has presented at national and international conferences (including MENC, The Midwest Clinic, AERA, and ISME) and has published over 50 articles on these topics in all of the major music education journals (including the Journal of Research in Music Education and the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education). She is currently on the editorial boards of the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, the Journal of Music Teacher Education, Music Education Research International, Advances in Music Education Research, and Update: Applications of Research in Music Education. Dr. Conway serves as program chair of the Music Special Interest Group of the American Educational Research Association. Her edited book entitled "Great Beginning for Music Teachers: A Guide to Mentoring and Induction" was released in October 2003 by MENC. "Handbook for the Beginning Music Teacher" by Colleen M. Conway and Thomas M. Hodgman was released by GIA Publications in January 2006.

Lori Custoderoo, Assistant Professor of Music Education at Teachers College, Columbia University, holds a Bachelor of Music in music theory and piano from the University of Redlands, a M.A. in music theory from California State University and a D.M.A. in music education from the University of Southern California. Over 20 years of experience with young children, parents, and teachers in a variety of musical settings has informed her research, which has focused on children from infancy through preadolescence, and adults as musicians, teachers, and parents. She has presented and published on issues of musical challenge, engagement, and meaning in classrooms, playgrounds, and family settings; recent titles include "Passing the Cultural Torch: Musical Experience and Musical Parenting of Infants" (Journal for Research in Music Education),"Perspectives on Challenges: A Longitudinal Investigation of Children's Music Learning" (Arts and Learning), and "Seeking Challenge, Finding Skill: Flow Experience in Music Education" (Arts Education and Policy Review). Formerly chair of the American Orff-Schulwerk Association's Research Advisory Review Panel and Co-Chair of the Music Educators National Conference's Special Research Interest Group for Early Childhood, she currently serves as chair for the International Society for Music Education's Early Childhood Commission.

James F. Daugherty, Associate Professor in the Division of Music Education and Music Therapy at the University of Kansas, directs the Concert Choir, and teaches in the areas of choral pedagogy and conducting, history and philosophy of music education, research methods, aesthetics, and music technology. He holds a Ph.D. from Florida State University, and master's degrees from Columbia University (M.A.), Union Theological Seminary in New York (M.Div.), and the University of Virginia (M.Ed.). He completed undergraduate concentrations in vocal performance and philosophy at Maryville College (Tennessee), and received a certificate in voice from the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik Berlin, Germany. He also serves on the editorial board of the Journal for Research in Music Education, and is editor of the International Journal of Research in Choral Singing.

Laura Ferguson is an Associate Professor of Music Education and is Coordinator of Music Education at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. A native of Illinois, she earned a BM in music education from Millikin University in Decatur Illinois, and the MME and EdD from the University of Illinois.

Ferguson is a specialist in elementary general music with particular research interests in children's expressive movements to music, the use of vernacular musics in classrooms, practical application of technology use, and developmental stages of aesthetic development. Before coming to IUP, she taught elementary general music, beginning strings, elementary and middle school band, and high school extra-curricular choral ensembles at schools in Central Illinois. Dr. Ferguson's interest in jazz, technology and all things general music continues to play an important role in her teaching, both at IUP and in workshops across the country. Her innovative use of technology in the classroom was recognized by a faculty teaching award during her first year at IUP and continues to be a vital aspect of her teaching.

Dr. Ferguson is a frequent clinician for the International Association of Jazz Educators where she presents at international conferences and serves as a Resource Team member, as well as serving on the faculty for IAJE's Teacher Training Institute. Dr. Ferguson is in frequent demand for MENC national and regional conferences, having presented workshops and guest lectures in Minnesota, Florida, Kansas, Delaware, Ohio, Illinois, Pennsylvania, California, Michigan, New York, Virginia, Nevada, Utah and West Virginia.

Dr. Ferguson frequently writes on the use of technology and vernacular music in the classroom, the reflective process of teaching, and applications of research in general music classrooms. Her articles have been published in Music Educators Journal, General Music Today, Journal for Historical Research in Music Education, Mountain Lake Reader, and Update: Applications of Research in Music Education.

Indiana University of Pennsylvania, Dr. Ferguson teaches methods courses for music majors and elementary education majors, graduate classes for master students in music education, supervises thesis work and student teaching, and is Coordinator of Music Education for the department. A former DownBeat award winner for "Best Collegiate Vocal Jazz Recording," she continues to perform with jazz combos and ensembles. When not teaching, she enjoys quilting, gardening, and spending quality time with her family.  

David Hargreaves, Professor of Child Development, is the Director of the Centre for International Research in Music Education, and Froebel Research Fellow at the University of Surrey Roehampton. He is also Visiting Professor of Research in Music Education at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, and Visiting Professor at the Inter-University Institute of Macau. He was Reader in Psychology at the University of Leicester between 1992-8. He is a Fellow of the British Psychological Society, and has held Visiting Research Fellowships at the University of Illinois at Chicago and at Florida State University, USA.

He was Editor off Psychology of Music 1989-96, Chair of the Research Commission of the International Society for Music Education (ISME) 1994-6, and is currently associate editor of Musicae Scientiae, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Psychology of Music, Music Education Research, Research and Issues in Music Education, Research Studies in Music Education, the International Journal of Music Education, and Musik & Bildung - Grundlagen. His publications, which have been translated into 13 languages, include The Developmental Psychology of Music (Cambridge University Press, 1986), Children and the Arts (Open University Press, 1989), Developmental Psychology and You (with Julia Berryman, Martin Herbert and Ann Taylor, Routledge and BPS, 1991), The Social Psychology of Music (with Adrian North, Oxford University Press, 1997), Musical Learning and Development: The International Perspective (with Adrian North, Continuum, 2001), and Musical Identities (with Raymond MacDonald and Dorothy Miell, Oxford University Press, 2002), as well as numerous journal articles and book chapters in psychology, music and education.

His main research and teaching interests are in developmental psychology and arts education, particularly music. He has published research on cognitive and social development in children and adolescents; creativity and psychological testing; development of gender roles; children's drawing; experimental aesthetics; computers in music education; development of musical preference and style sensitivity; peer collaboration in musical composition; assessment in arts education and musical performance; creativity and jazz improvisation; the social psychology of music listening..
Dr. Hargreave's research has received financial support from the ESRC, the Leverhulme Trust, the Froebel Educational Institute, the Nuffield Foundation, the Leicester-Loughborough Universities joint research fund, PRS and PPL Ltd., and the Associated Boards of the Royal Schools of Music (ABRSM). Current projects include pupils' experiences of school music (funded by QCA); assessment in arts education and musical performance: peer collaboration in musical composition; teacher and pupil identities in secondary school music (funded by ESRC); the development of musical creativity (funded by Froebel Educational Institute); creativity and jazz improvisation; the social context of music listening.

In recent years he has spoken about his research at conferences and meetings in various countries on all 5 continents. He is a keen jazz pianist and composer who has appeared on BBC TV and radio. Dr. Hargreaves holds a Bachelor of Science and a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Durham, United Kingdom.

David G. Hebert, David G. Hebert, PhD is a Professor of Music with the Grieg Academy, Bergen University College, Norway. His previous academic positions were with Sibelius Academy (Finland), Boston University (USA), National Institutes for the Humanities-Nichibunken (Japan), Lomonosov Moscow State University (Russia), and Te Wananga O Aotearoa (New Zealand). A widely-cited researcher, Professor Hebert has served in editorial roles for International Journal of Education and the Arts, Journal of Music and Meaning, Research in New Zealand Performing Arts, and Finnish Journal of Music Education, and has been a reviewer for International Society for Philosophy of Music Education and Oxford University Press. He has received grants for music projects from government programs in the USA, Japan, and New Zealand, as well as various foundations. Professor Hebert is author of Wind Bands and Cultural Identity in Japanese Schools, contributing editor of Patriotism and Nationalism in Music Education, and he is currently co-authoring Theory and Method in Historical Ethnomusicology. His other writings appear in 25 different professional journals and as chapters in such books as Oxford Handbook of Music Education, Sociology and Music Education, Music Education for Changing Times: Guiding Visions for Practice, De-Canonizing Music History, Alta Musica, Music of Japan Today, and Multicultural Perspectives in Music Education. Professor Hebert is Chair of the Historical Ethnomusicology special interest group of the Society for Ethnomusicology, an active member of NNIMIPA (http://www.nnimipa.org/), and a founding member of the Glomus Network for higher music education (http://glomus.net), which offers a pioneering Master of Global Music program.

Mike Hewitt is a specialist in instrumental music education and teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in this area at the University of Maryland. Additionally he supervises clinical field experiences in K-12 settings, directs graduate research, and advises the student MENC chapter. Prior to joining the faculty at Maryland, he was a band director at the elementary and secondary levels in the states of New York, Michigan, and Arizona.

His research interests are focused in the areas of music teacher education, self-regulated learning in instrumental music and quality music teaching. His research has been published in the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Contributions to Music Education, and the Journal of Research in Music Education. 

Professor Hewitt has made frequent presentations that concentrate on instrumental music education at regional, national, and international meetings of the College Music Society, Music Educators National Conference, and the College Band Directors National Association. He is frequently invited by schools to serve as a guest conductor, adjudicator, consultant, and clinician.

Sondra Wieland Howe is an independent scholar in Minnesota. She holds an A.B. in music from Wellesley College, A.M.T. in music education from Radcliffe College, and an M.A. in musicology and a Ph.D. in music education from the University of Minnesota. She is an independent piano teacher in Wayzata, Minnesota, and the musicologist for the Minnesota High School Music Listening Contest. Her research area is the history of music education and women in music and she is the author of Luther Whiting Mason: International Music Educator (Harmonie Park Press, 1997), book chapters, and articles in the Journal of Historical Research in Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, and the Philosophy of Music Education Review.

Estelle R. Jorgensen, Professor of Music Education in the School of Music, Indiana University, Bloomington, teaches graduate courses in the foundations of music education. Editor of the Philosophy of Music Education Review http://iupjournals.org/pmer, founding chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of MENC, author of In Search of Music Education (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997) and Transforming Music Education (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2003) and frequent contributor to leading research journals in music education internationally, she has spoken and written about a broad array of themes in the philosophy of music education. Australian born, she has taught music in the school grades in Canada, at McGill University, Montreal, and lectured in Finland, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and Australia. She has led and contributed to several international symposia in the philosophy of music education held in Bloomington, USA (1990), Toronto, Canada (1994), Los Angeles, USA (1997), and Birmingham, UK (2000). She is currently co-chair of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education. Among the various honors for her contributions to the philosophy of music education, she has been named a fellow of the Philosophy of Education Society, and is the recipient of an honorary doctorate in music from Andrews University, USA. Dr. Jorgensen holds a B.A. from Newcastle University, New South Wales, Australia, a M.M. from Andrews University, Berrien Springs, Michigan, and a Ph.D. in music education from the University of Calgary, Canada (1976)

Barbara Lewis, Associate Professor at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, North Dakota, holds a Ph.D. from Indiana University in music education and has taught K-8 general music in the public schools of Maryland as well as graduate and undergraduate music education courses at the college level. Her research has appeared in several journals including Psychology of Music, Journal of Research in Music Education, Update, the Southeastern Journal of Music Education, and Philosophy of Music Education Review. Dr. Lewis has recently edited a book published by MENC titled Syllabi for Music Methods Coursess.

Herbert Marshall, Assistant professor at Baldwin-Wallace College, holds degrees in music education from Michigan State University, Syracuse University, and Temple University.  After teaching instrumental and general music in the public schools in upstate New York for 11 years, he served on the faculties of Temple University and Georgia State University, and now teaches undergraduate and graduate courses and advises research at Michigan.   His research interests and clinic activities focus on music acquisition, general and instrumental music methodology, multicultural music, urban education, and reflective teaching practice, as well as action research, which resulted in the development of a community music program at Adrian College for research in early childhood music instruction and acquisition. Dr. Marshall serves frequently as a clinician, consultant, adjudicator, and conductor, and teaches workshops for the Gordon Institute of Music Learning.  His musical and educational activities on four continents have prompted a lifelong interest in studying and sharing diverse musical styles and means of transmission throughout the world.

Kerry Renzoni Filsinger, Assistant Professor of Music at SUNY Buffalo State. There, she serves as Coordinator of the undergraduate music education program, teaches undergraduate and graduate music education courses, and guides student research projects. Dr. Filsinger received a Ph.D. in music education from Temple University, where she was awarded a University Fellowship and the prestigious Presser Music Award. She holds a B.M. in both harp performance and music education from the Eastman School of Music, and an M.M. in music education from the Eastman School of Music. In addition to teaching elementary general music for six years in Western New York, Dr. Filsinger has taught at SUNY Fredonia and through the Boston University online graduate degree program. Dr. Filsinger is an active researcher, conference presenter, and clinician at the state, national, and international levels. She has presented at ISME, NAfME, SMTE, MENC Eastern, NYSSMA, PMEA, NJMEA, CMEA, and the Suncoast Music Education Research Symposium. Her research interests include the role of environment in music learning and children’s music creativity.

Mitchell Robinson is associate professor of music education at Michigan State University, where he teaches graduate and undergraduate courses and coordinates the student teaching program. Previous positions include an appointment as assistant professor and coordinator of music education at the University of Connecticut, and an appointment as assistant professor of school and community music education at the Eastman School of Music in Rochester, NY, where he also served as director of wind activities and wind ensemble conductor at the University of Rochester. Prior to that, Dr. Robinson taught for 10 years in the public schools of New York State, and also worked in administrative positions as a music supervisor and high school assistant principal.

Dr. Robinson holds BFA degrees in music education and performance (trumpet) from SUNY Buffalo, a Masters degree in music education and conducting from the Hartt School of Music, a school administrative certificate from SUNY College at Oswego, and a Ph.D. in Music Education from the Eastman School of Music. He has also pursued post-graduate studies in music education and conducting at Northwestern University. Robinson was awarded the 1997 Reston Prize from Arts Education Policy Review for his analysis of arts education policy, and the 1999 Research Award from the International Network of Performing & Visual Arts Schools.

Dr. Robinson's research interests include beginning music teacher induction and support, school/college collaboration, assessment, and the effects of educational policy initiatives on music teachers and students. His publications have appeared in Arts Education Policy Review, Music Educators Journal, the Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, American Music Teacher, American School Board Journal, and the Journal of Music Teacher Education, and he contributed chapters to two books from MENC on beginning music teacher induction and mentoring and issues in urban music education. Robinson currently serves on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Music Teacher Education, and is the Chair of the Editorial Committee of the Music Educators Journal.

Fumiko Shiraishi, assistant professor of music education at Iwate University in Japan, earned her bachelor's degree and a master's degree in music education at Joetsu University of Education (Japan) and another master's degree in educational philosophy at the University of Tsukuba (Japan). She studied in the United States as a Fulbright scholar and received a Ph.D. in music education from the University of Kansas. Her research interest is general music at the elementary and secondary school level, particularly the historical, philosophical, and theoretical inquiry of its values, goals, curriculum, and methodology. Her research in the history of American music education has been published in The Bulletin of Historical Research in Music Education, Journal of Research in Music Education, and several Japanese learned journals.

Katherine Strand, Assistant professor of music education at Indiana University, holds a Ph.D. in music education from Northwestern University (2003), a Master of music in choral conducting from Virginia Commonwealth University (1987), and a Bachelor of Arts in music from Allegheny College (1981). Dr. Strand is on the voice faculty, and is an integrated arts teacher at the summer Virginia Governor's School for the Humanities and the Visual and Performing Arts, and is the director of the Descant choir for the Indiana University Children's Chorus. She has taught pre-kindergarten through 12th-grade choral and general music in Virginia and the Chicago public schools, and served for four years with the School for the Performing Arts in the Richmond Community performing arts academy as vocal coach and music director. Dr. Strand's research interests include action research, learning and transfer, integrated curriculum development, and composing in the music classroom. Her articles have appeared in the Music Educators Journal and the Indiana Musicator, and she has presented research on preschool children's rhythmic perception at the 6th International Conference on Music Cognition and Perception in Keele, England and on incorporating research in the undergraduate curriculum at the 2004 National MENC conference.

Jill M. Sullivan is an Assistant Professor of Instrumental Music Education at Arizona State University in the School of Music, which is part of the Herberger College of Arts. She teaches undergraduate instrumental methods, doctoral research classes in quantitative and historical methodologies, and a master's level course in instrumental literature. Prior to working at ASU, she held teaching positions at the University of Oklahoma, and Augustana College in Rock Island, Illinois.

Her research agenda includes historical publications pertaining to nineteenth- and twentieth-century women's bands and quantitative pre-service and in-service music teacher investigations. Dr. Sullivan has published in several refereed music journals: American Music, Bulletin of the Council for Research in Music Education, Contributions to Music Education, Journal of Band Research, Journal of Music Therapy, Journal of Research in Music Education, Research and Issues in Music Education, and Teaching Music. She is currently completing her book American Women's Military Bands during World War II as part of The Scarecrow Press new series on American Wind Bands. She has presented her research and teacher-pedagogy workshops internationally in Australia, Austria, Italy, and Sweden.

Currently Dr. Sullivan serves as the national chair of CMENC (Collegiate Music Educators of the National Association for Music Education), the past chair of Arizona CMENC, and is the ASU CMENC chapter advisor. She also is the past chair of the Gender Special Research Interest Group (SRIG) of The National Association for Music Education and is the past president of ACME (Arizona College Music Educators).

David Teachout is Associate Professor and Chair of the Music Education Division at the University of North Carolina Greensboro (UNCG). Prior to joining the faculty at UNCG, he taught undergraduate and graduate courses at the University of Minnesota and at Pennsylvania State University; he also enjoyed ten years of successful public school instrumental music teaching experience in Moore, Oklahoma.

With degrees from West Virginia University (Bachelor of Music Education), the University of Oklahoma (Master of Music Education), and Kent State University (Ph.D), Dr. Teachout has been an active teacher, clinician, and researcher. He has also been invited to conduct ensembles and present clinics in Alabama, Arkansas, Illinois, Minnesota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, and West Virginia.

Dr. Teachout's research interest is in the area of pre-service music teacher development. He has been published in the Journal of Research in Music Education, Contributions in Music Education, Journal of Band Research, On the Sociology of Music Education, Curricular Innovations in Music, Psychology of Music, Southeastern Journal of Music Education and has presented research at state, national, and international conferences.

Cecilia Wang is the director of the Orff Program at the University of Kentucky. She is an active researcher, and has published in the teaches at the University of Kentucky where she has served as the director of the Orff Schulwerk Program for over twenty years. She presents research studies regularly and has published in national and international journals including the Journal of Research in Music Education (JRME), Psychology of Music, and other journals. She had served on the editorial board of JRME, IJME, JTME, SRME, as the RIG chair for the American Orff-Schulwerk Association (AOSA), and as national chair of the General Research SRIG for the Music Education Research Council. Her areas of research include music perception, teacher effectiveness, and creative thinking. Dr. Wang holds a BME from Viterbo University, La Crosse, Wisconsin, and a MME and a Ph.D. in Fine Arts from Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX.