Summer 2014 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PSYC 111 - 01 General Psychology M - W - - 1300 - 1700 JRC LL01
CRN: 30054 4 Credit Hours Instructor: James A. Robinson An introduction to the research questions, concepts, theories, methods, and findings of psychological science. Although the selection varies with instructor, topics include brain function, psychological testing, sensation and perception, cognition (learning, memory, language), states of consciousness, motivation, human development, personality, origins and treatment of disorders, social behavior, stress and health, and applied psychology (workplace, community, environment). This course fulfills the Social Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.
PSYC 212 - 01 Research Meth in Psych M - W - - 1300 - 1700 JRC LL45
CRN: 30045 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John R. Buri Research designs and problems, with emphasis on operationalization of concepts, development of hypotheses, specific research designs, sources of error, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and use of APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220) View Online Printable Schedule
PSYC 288 - 01 Psy of Marriage & Family M - W - - 0800 - 1200 JRC LL01
CRN: 30018 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John R. Buri An examination of the psychological concepts, issues, challenges and changes relevant to marriage and family today. Topics include intimacy, liking and loving, power and control, gender, marriage and family therapy, and the psychological effects of marriage vs. non-marriage, divorce, and various parenting styles. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing or permission of the instructor
PSYC 323 - 01 Learning and Memory - T - R - 0800 - 1200 JRC LL62
CRN: 30019 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John R. Buri The basic concepts involved in simple associative learning are presented, along with theoretical and applied concerns. The analysis and modification of animal and human behavior by means of classical and instrumental conditioning are discussed. The course also will trace the history of the study of learning from its roots in philosophy to the current cognitive approach. Prerequisite: PSYC 212
PSYC 495 - I1 Individual Study - - - - - 0700 - 0800
CRN: 30654 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jean E. Giebenhain

Fall 2014 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PSYC 111 - 01 General Psychology M - W - F 0935 - 1040 JRC LL01
CRN: 40313 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John R. Buri An introduction to the research questions, concepts, theories, methods, and findings of psychological science. Although the selection varies with instructor, topics include brain function, psychological testing, sensation and perception, cognition (learning, memory, language), states of consciousness, motivation, human development, personality, origins and treatment of disorders, social behavior, stress and health, and applied psychology (workplace, community, environment). This course fulfills the Social Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.
PSYC 111 - 02 General Psychology M - W - F 1215 - 1320 JRC LL01
CRN: 40314 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John R. Buri An introduction to the research questions, concepts, theories, methods, and findings of psychological science. Although the selection varies with instructor, topics include brain function, psychological testing, sensation and perception, cognition (learning, memory, language), states of consciousness, motivation, human development, personality, origins and treatment of disorders, social behavior, stress and health, and applied psychology (workplace, community, environment). This course fulfills the Social Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.
PSYC 111 - 03 General Psychology - T - R - 0955 - 1135 JRC LL62
CRN: 40315 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Sarah E. Hankerson An introduction to the research questions, concepts, theories, methods, and findings of psychological science. Although the selection varies with instructor, topics include brain function, psychological testing, sensation and perception, cognition (learning, memory, language), states of consciousness, motivation, human development, personality, origins and treatment of disorders, social behavior, stress and health, and applied psychology (workplace, community, environment). This course fulfills the Social Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.
PSYC 111 - 04 General Psychology M - W - F 0815 - 0920 JRC LL62
CRN: 40316 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Sarah E. Hankerson An introduction to the research questions, concepts, theories, methods, and findings of psychological science. Although the selection varies with instructor, topics include brain function, psychological testing, sensation and perception, cognition (learning, memory, language), states of consciousness, motivation, human development, personality, origins and treatment of disorders, social behavior, stress and health, and applied psychology (workplace, community, environment). This course fulfills the Social Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.
PSYC 111 - 05 General Psychology M - W - - 1730 - 1915 JRC LL01
CRN: 41266 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nicole T. Arola An introduction to the research questions, concepts, theories, methods, and findings of psychological science. Although the selection varies with instructor, topics include brain function, psychological testing, sensation and perception, cognition (learning, memory, language), states of consciousness, motivation, human development, personality, origins and treatment of disorders, social behavior, stress and health, and applied psychology (workplace, community, environment). This course fulfills the Social Analysis requirement in the core curriculum.
PSYC 121 - 01 Social Psychology M - W - F 1055 - 1200 JRC LL01
CRN: 40317 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John M. Tauer This is an introduction to the field of social psychology, which examines how an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the social context. The course covers such topics as conformity, persuasion, stereotypes and prejudice, love and relationships, helping behavior and altruism, aggression, the self-concept, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 121 - 02 Social Psychology M - W - F 1335 - 1440 JRC LL01
CRN: 41201 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Britain A. Scott This is an introduction to the field of social psychology, which examines how an individual's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by the social context. The course covers such topics as conformity, persuasion, stereotypes and prejudice, love and relationships, helping behavior and altruism, aggression, the self-concept, and group dynamics. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 151 - 01 Cross-Cultural Psychology M - W - F 0815 - 0920 JRC LL01
CRN: 40812 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ryan H. Bremner This course is designed to cover the issues and themes current in the field of cross-cultural psychology. Examples of such issues include: cultural variation along the lines of collectivism and individualism; psychological principles that might be universal compared to those that are culturally specific; how content and context affect psychological functioning, and variation within as well as between cultures. A range of substantive areas within psychology will be examined, including social, developmental, organizational, cognitive, health psychology, and psychology of emotion. Examples will be drawn from a range of non-Western cultures (e.g., Japan, India, Liberia) as well as various cultures within the United States (e.g., African-American, Hispanic, American Indian). Emphasis will be placed on how Western and non-Western cultures differ from each other, on how non-Western cultures differ from each other, and on how intra-cultural variation also plays important roles in psychological functioning. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 200 - 02 Infancy & Childhood M - W - F 1215 - 1320 JRC LL62
CRN: 42558 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Allison C. Jessee An introduction to issues and theories of development dealing with infancy, toddlerhood, and early and middle childhood. The course reviews the principles, theories, research and application of cognitive, emotional, personality, social and physical development. Also examined is how children develop the knowledge, skills, and personality characteristics that allow them to become successful adults as well as how differences among children come about. Prerequisite: PSYC 111 NOTE: Students who receive credit for PSYC 200 may not receive credit for PSYC 202.
PSYC 202 - 01 Lifespan Development - T - - - 1730 - 2115 JRC LL62
CRN: 40319 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Tonia S. Bock An introduction to developmental principles and theories throughout the life span. The course also includes research, application and the interplay among the physical, emotional, social and intellectual variables in the process of growth and development. Also examined is how individuals develop the knowledge, skills, and personality characteristics that allow them to become successful later in life as well as how differences among individuals come about. Prerequisite: PSYC 111 NOTE: Students who receive credit for PSYC 202 may not receive credit for PSYC 200 or 204.
PSYC 203 - 01 Psychology of Adolescence - T - R - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL62
CRN: 40320 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Tonia S. Bock An introduction to issues and theories of development dealing with adolescence. The course reviews the principles, theories, research and application of cognitive, emotional, personality, social and physical development. Also examined is how adolescents develop the knowledge, skills, and personality characteristics that allow them to become successful adults as well as how differences among teens come about. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 206 - 01 Brain & Human Behavior - T - R - 0800 - 0940 JRC LL62
CRN: 40321 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Sarah E. Hankerson An examination of brain systems that subserve human behavior. Topics include: human development, consciousness, social behavior, cognition, emotion and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 206 - 02 Brain & Human Behavior M - W - F 1215 - 1320 JRC LL45
CRN: 40703 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paul J. Beckmann An examination of brain systems that subserve human behavior. Topics include: human development, consciousness, social behavior, cognition, emotion and abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 207 - 01 Alcohol, Drugs & Behavior - T - R - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL01
CRN: 40322 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Uta Wolfe The course surveys some basic facts and principles of administration, absorption, transport, action, deactivation and elimination of drugs. Various classes of drugs; their effects on mood, behavior, and consciousness; their use and misuse; and phenomena of chemical dependency and its treatment modalities are discussed. Lectures, readings, films, tapes and invited speakers are employed. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 212 - 01 Research Methods in Psychology M - W - F 1055 - 1200 JRC LL45
CRN: 40323 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elise L. Amel Research designs and problems, with emphasis on operationalization of concepts, development of hypotheses, specific research designs, sources of error, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and use of APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220) View Online Printable Schedule
PSYC 212 - 02 Research Methods in Psychology - T - R - 1730 - 1915 JRC LL21
CRN: 40527 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Uta Wolfe Research designs and problems, with emphasis on operationalization of concepts, development of hypotheses, specific research designs, sources of error, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and use of APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220) View Online Printable Schedule
PSYC 212 - 03 Research Methods in Psychology - T - R - 0955 - 1135 JRC LL45
CRN: 41202 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paul J. Beckmann Research designs and problems, with emphasis on operationalization of concepts, development of hypotheses, specific research designs, sources of error, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and use of APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220) View Online Printable Schedule
PSYC 212 - 51 Research Methods in Psyc/ Lab M - - - - 0830 - 1030 JRC LL45
CRN: 40324 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Elise L. Amel Research designs and problems, with emphasis on operationalization of concepts, development of hypotheses, specific research designs, sources of error, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and use of APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220) View Online Printable Schedule
PSYC 212 - 52 Research Methods in Psyc/Lab - T - - - 1930 - 2115 JRC LL21
CRN: 40528 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Uta Wolfe Research designs and problems, with emphasis on operationalization of concepts, development of hypotheses, specific research designs, sources of error, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and use of APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220) View Online Printable Schedule
PSYC 212 - 53 Research Methods in Psyc/Lab - - - - F 0830 - 1030 JRC LL45
CRN: 41204 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Paul J. Beckmann Research designs and problems, with emphasis on operationalization of concepts, development of hypotheses, specific research designs, sources of error, literature reviews, data collection, data analysis and use of APA format. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and STAT 220 (QMCS 220 or IDTH 220) View Online Printable Schedule
PSYC 288 - 01 Psych of Marriage & Family M - W - - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL01
CRN: 40325 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John R. Buri An examination of the psychological concepts, issues, challenges and changes relevant to marriage and family today. Topics include intimacy, liking and loving, power and control, gender, marriage and family therapy, and the psychological effects of marriage vs. non-marriage, divorce, and various parenting styles. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing or permission of the instructor
PSYC 301 - 01 Psychopathology - T - R - 0800 - 0940 JRC LL01
CRN: 40327 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jean E. Giebenhain This course sets forth a framework for understanding abnormal or maladaptive behavior. It will investigate specific diagnostic categories (such as depression and schizophrenia), causal factors and treatments of these maladaptive patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing
PSYC 301 - 02 Psychopathology - T - R - 0955 - 1135 JRC LL01
CRN: 40326 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jean E. Giebenhain This course sets forth a framework for understanding abnormal or maladaptive behavior. It will investigate specific diagnostic categories (such as depression and schizophrenia), causal factors and treatments of these maladaptive patterns. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing
PSYC 302 - 01 Personality Theories - T - R - 1730 - 1915 JRC LL01
CRN: 40328 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jhon T. Wlaschin A review of major theories of personality, including psychoanalytic, behavioristic, humanistic and trait-factor approaches. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 315 - 01 Cognition - T - R - 1330 - 1510 JRC LL62
CRN: 40813 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paul J. Beckmann This course will provide an overview of cognitive processes, the processes that collectively comprise what is commonly termed "thinking." Topics discussed will include perception, attention, remembering, language, problem solving, reasoning, and social cognition. The course will focus on how these processes operate in everyday situations, as well as empirical (laboratory) investigations of these processes. Connections between cognitive psychology and other areas of psychology (e.g., clinical, biological) will also be discussed. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 321 - 01 Res Issues: Social Psych - T - R - 1330 - 1510 JRC LL45
CRN: 41231 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Britain A. Scott This laboratory course provides hand-on experience in the design, implementation, and presentation of a social psychology experiment. Class readings and discussion introduce social psychological research, link classic social psychological research to current social issues, and teach students to do what social psychology researchers do. Prerequisite: PSYC 212
PSYC 321 - 51 Res Issues: Social Psych/Lab - - - R - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL45
CRN: 41232 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Britain A. Scott This laboratory course provides hand-on experience in the design, implementation, and presentation of a social psychology experiment. Class readings and discussion introduce social psychological research, link classic social psychological research to current social issues, and teach students to do what social psychology researchers do. Prerequisite: PSYC 212
PSYC 322 - 01 Sensation and Perception M - W - F 1055 - 1200 JRC LL62
CRN: 40329 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer R. Prichard A study of the structure and function of sensory systems, the information that these systems provide the brain, and the subsequent interpretation of sensory information that we call perception. The course focuses on visual perception (e.g., brightness, color, form, depth, movement, constancy, illusions) and auditory perception (e.g., detection, discrimination, loudness, pitch) and incorporates art and music. Prerequisite: PSYC 212
PSYC 322 - 51 Sensation and Perception/Lab - - - R - 0930 - 1130 JRC LL21
CRN: 40330 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer R. Prichard A study of the structure and function of sensory systems, the information that these systems provide the brain, and the subsequent interpretation of sensory information that we call perception. The course focuses on visual perception (e.g., brightness, color, form, depth, movement, constancy, illusions) and auditory perception (e.g., detection, discrimination, loudness, pitch) and incorporates art and music. Prerequisite: PSYC 212
PSYC 322 - 52 Sensation & Perception/Lab - - - - F 0830 - 1030 JRC LL21
CRN: 41843 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer R. Prichard A study of the structure and function of sensory systems, the information that these systems provide the brain, and the subsequent interpretation of sensory information that we call perception. The course focuses on visual perception (e.g., brightness, color, form, depth, movement, constancy, illusions) and auditory perception (e.g., detection, discrimination, loudness, pitch) and incorporates art and music. Prerequisite: PSYC 212
PSYC 342 - 01 Psychology and Work - T - R - 1330 - 1510 JRC LL01
CRN: 42893 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elise L. Amel This course presents basic concepts of psychology as they apply everyday in the workplace. Topics to be covered include measurement and its applications in the workplace (e.g., personnel decisions and performance appraisals), worker training, worker attitudes and motivation, worker adjustment, health and safety, leadership, communication and group behavior and development of the organization. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing
PSYC 365 - 01 Health Psychology M - W - F 1215 - 1320 JRC LL21
CRN: 42901 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jennifer R. Prichard This survey course will examine the contributions of psychological research to the understanding, prevention, and treatment of a variety of health concerns. This course will employ a biopsychosocial model, which means that we will study how social, emotional, behavioral, biological, and spiritual factors influence health. The specific topics include injury, stress, pain management, additions, sleep, patient-physician relations, and chronic illnesses such as Alzheimer's, diabetes, and AIDS. Prerequisite: PSYC 111
PSYC 400 - 01 Seminar in Cognition M - - - - 1730 - 2115 JRC LL62
CRN: 42895 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Tonia S. Bock Current theory and research in a specific topic related to cognition. Topics will vary, but will include in-depth coverage of specific topics related to thinking and consciousness. Sample topics include (but will not be limited to) specific aspects of consciousness (e.g. Sleep and Cognition), memory (e.g. eyewitness memory or memory distortion), social cognition (e.g. stereotyping), developmental cognition (e.g. language development), cognitive neuroscience (e.g. brain mechanisms underlying attention), comparative cognition (e.g. animal language), and applied cognition (e.g. human-computer interaction). Prerequisite: PSYC 111 and one additional PSYC course or permission of the instructor.
PSYC 402 - 01 Developmental Psych Research M - W - - 1335 - 1510 JRC LL45
CRN: 42896 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Allison C. Jessee This laboratory course presents methods and designs in developmental research methodology. The course examines observational, experimental and quasi- experimental research as well as analyses, ethics, and other core issues in developmental psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 200 or 202; and PSYC 212
PSYC 402 - 51 Develop. Psych Research LAB M - - - - 1515 - 1715 JRC LL45
CRN: 42897 Credit Hours Instructor: Allison C. Jessee This laboratory course presents methods and designs in developmental research methodology. The course examines observational, experimental and quasi- experimental research as well as analyses, ethics, and other core issues in developmental psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 200 or 202; and PSYC 212
PSYC 415 - 01 Research Issues in Cognition - - W - - 1730 - 2115 JRC LL45
CRN: 41447 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gregory L. Robinson-Riegler This laboratory course explores research issues in cognitive psychology, with special emphasis on cognitive psychology methodology, current research issues, hands-on research, and discussion/analysis of primary research sources. Specific topics covered each semester may vary slightly. Examples of topics include: subliminal perception; automatic processing; implicit memory; eyewitness testimony; memory reconstruction; expertise and problem solving; the use of heuristics in decision making; person memory. Approximately four lectures and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: PSYC 212 and 315
PSYC 415 - 51 Research Issues in Cog./Lab - T - - - 1515 - 1715 JRC LL45
CRN: 41448 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Gregory L. Robinson-Riegler This laboratory course explores research issues in cognitive psychology, with special emphasis on cognitive psychology methodology, current research issues, hands-on research, and discussion/analysis of primary research sources. Specific topics covered each semester may vary slightly. Examples of topics include: subliminal perception; automatic processing; implicit memory; eyewitness testimony; memory reconstruction; expertise and problem solving; the use of heuristics in decision making; person memory. Approximately four lectures and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: PSYC 212 and 315
PSYC 422 - 01 History of Psych in Context M - W - - 1335 - 1510 JRC LL62
CRN: 40331 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ryan H. Bremner This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good."
PSYC 422 - 02 History of Psych in Context - T - - - 1730 - 2115 JRC LL45
CRN: 40480 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jean E. Giebenhain This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good."
PSYC 422 - 03 History of Psych in Context M - W - - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL62
CRN: 42876 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ryan H. Bremner This course explores psychology's past with a special focus on events representing the discipline's sustained interest in applying science to enhance human welfare. From its early days, U.S. psychologists have applied our discipline's knowledge to solve social problems. This course examines psychology's complicity, in its early years, with questionable cultural practices and unjust social norms (e.g. the eugenics movement, racial bias). We also study the social/historical context surrounding psychology's early applications. The goal is to promote reflection on the place of psychology in the broader culture and raise awareness of the complexities inherent in using science to solve social problems, in the service of preparing students to be "morally responsible leaders who think critically, act wisely, and work skillfully to advance the common good."
PSYC 478 - 01 Experiential Learning - - - - - -
CRN: 40955 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Allison C. Jessee

J-Term 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PSYC 200 - 01 Psy: Infancy & Childhood - T W R F 0900 - 1200 JRC LL62
CRN: 10230 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Allison C. Jessee An introduction to issues and theories of development dealing with infancy, toddlerhood, and early and middle childhood. The course reviews the principles, theories, research and application of cognitive, emotional, personality, social and physical development. Also examined is how children develop the knowledge, skills, and personality characteristics that allow them to become successful adults as well as how differences among children come about. Prerequisite: PSYC 111 NOTE: Students who receive credit for PSYC 200 may not receive credit for PSYC 202.
PSYC 288 - 01 Psy of Marriage & Family - T W R F 1300 - 1600 JRC LL62
CRN: 10012 4 Credit Hours Instructor: John R. Buri An examination of the psychological concepts, issues, challenges and changes relevant to marriage and family today. Topics include intimacy, liking and loving, power and control, gender, marriage and family therapy, and the psychological effects of marriage vs. non-marriage, divorce, and various parenting styles. Prerequisites: PSYC 111 and junior standing or permission of the instructor