The University of St. Thomas

Prizes and Awards

Prizes and Awards

The St. Thomas Philosophy of Religion Project announces the winners of two prizes for work in the philosophy of religion and philosophical theology. Both prizes have been made possible by a generous grant from the John Templeton Foundation.

The C.S. Lewis Book Prize

The C.S. Lewis Book Prize recognizes the best recent book in the philosophy of religion or philosophical theology written for a general audience. The twenty-two entries were judged on quality of argumentation, importance of the positions argued for, level of accessibility to a general audience, and stylistic or literary merits.

First place goes to:

C. Stephen Evans, of Baylor University, for Natural Signs and the Knowledge of God: A New Look at Theistic Arguments (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010).

Dr. Evans is currently University Professor of Philosophy and Humanities at Baylor University, having formerly taught at Calvin College, St. Olaf College, and Wheaton College. He has  published numerous books and articles in the philosophy of religion and on Kierkegaard; a book on God and Moral Obligation is forthcoming from Oxford University Press. He is a past president of the Society of Christian Philosophers and of the Kierkegaard Society of North America.

Second place goes to:

Rebecca Konyndyk DeYoung, of Calvin College, for Glittering Vices: A New Look at the Seven Deadly Sins and Their Remedies (Grand Rapids, MI: Brazos Press, 2009).

Dr. Konyndyk DeYoung is a professor of philosophy at Calvin College, where she has taught ethics and the histroy of ancient and medieval philosophy since 1998. Her books include Glittering Vices and Aquinas's Ethics (Notre Dame, 2009, co-authored with Christina VanDyk and Colleen McCluskey). She has also published many articles and chapters on vices and virtues, including recently "Holy Fear" (ACPQ 86:1), "Aquinas on the Vice of Sloth: Three Interpretive Issues" (Thomist 75:1), "The Vice of Sloth: Some Historical Reflections on Laziness, Effort, and Resistance to the Demands of Love" forthcoming in Virtues and Their Vices (eds. Kevin Timpe and Craig Boyd, Oxford University Press). Her most recent project is to spend her sabbatical working hard on a book on the vice of sloth.

The 2011 Excellence in Philosophy of Religion Prize

The 2011 Excellence in Philosophy of Religion Prize attempts to identify the three best papers published in 2011 in the areas of philosophy of religion or philosophical theology. From a strong pool of thirty-six entries, our panel of three expert reviewers has selected three winners:

Bradley Monton for "Prolegomena to Any Future Physics-Based Metaphysics," Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion, Volume III, Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011, pp. 142-165.

Dr. Monton is Associate Professor of Philosophy at University of Colorado at Boulder; he is currently a visiting professor at Victoria University of Wellington. His research focuses on philosophy of physics, philosophy of time, probabilistic epistemology, and philosophy of religion. He is the author of the book Seeking God in Science (Broadview, 2009).

Jeff Speaks for "Foreknowledge, evil, and compatibility arguments, Faith and Philosophy 28:3 (2011), 269-293.

Dr. Speaks is Rev. John O'Brien Associate Professor in the Department of Philosophy at Notre Dame. He works mainly in the philosophy of language and the philosophy of mind.

Chris Tucker for "Phenomenal Conservatism and Evidentialism in Religious Epistemology." In Evidence and Religious Belief, edited by Kelly James Clark and Raymond VanArragon. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011.

Dr. Tucker is a Lecturer at the University of Auckland; in August 2013 he will join the College of William and Mary as an Assistant Professor. He specializes in epistemology, philosophy of religion, ethics, and their intersection. He is the editor of the forthcoming book Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism (OUP) and has published in Philosophical Review, Philosophical Perspectives, Philosophical Studies, and Australasian Journal of Philosophy, among other venues.

Previous Years

Winners of the 2010 Excellence in Philosophy of Religion Prize

We received a strong pool of forty-four submissions for our 2010 article prize, and after careful deliberation the selection panel has named the three winners. In alphabetical order, they are: 

W. Matthews Grant for “Can a Libertarian hold that Our Free Acts are Caused by God?” Faith and Philosophy 27:1 (January 2010): 22-44.

Dr. Grant is Associate Professor of Philosophy at University of St. Thomas (St. Paul, MN). His research has focused on medieval and contemporary philosophy of God, especially on divine simplicity and the relationship between divine and human agency. He is Associate Editor of the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. 

David M. Holley for “Treating God’s Existence as an Explanatory Hypothesis” American Philosophical Quarterly 47:4 (October 2010): 377-88.

Dr. Holley is Professor of Philosophy and Chair of the Department of Philosophy and Religion at The University of Southern Mississippi. He specializes in philosophy of religion and ethics. His most recent book is entitled Meaning and Mystery: What It Means to Believe in God (Wiley-Blackwell, 2010). His published articles include “Disengaged Reason and Belief in God” (Faith and Philosophy), “The Role of Anthropomorphism in Hume’s Critique of Theism” (International Journal for Philosophy of Religion), “Is God A Utilitarian?” (Religious Studies), “Should Believers Be Interested in Arguments for God’s Existence?” (American Philosophical Quarterly), “Self-Interest and Integrity” (International Philosophical Quarterly), “Self-Transforming Experiences” (The Personalist Forum), “Sidgwick’s Problem” (Ethical Theory and Moral Practice), and “Everyone’s Doing It: Common Practice and Moral Judgment” (Journal of Value Inquiry).

Yujin Nagasawa for “The Ontological Argument and the Devil,” Philosophical Quarterly 60 (October 2010): 72-91.

Dr. Nagasawa is Reader in Philosophy of Religion and Co-Director of the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion at the University of Birmingham, UK. His research focuses on philosophy of religion and philosophy of mind. He is author of God and Phenomenal Consciousness (Cambridge University Press, 2008) and The Existence of God (Routledge, 2011).

Winners of the 2009 Excellence in Philosophy of Religion Prize

We received a strong pool of forty submissions for our 2009 article prize, and after careful deliberation the selection panel has named the three winners. In alphabetical order, they are:

Jeffrey E. Brower for "Simplicity and Aseity," in The Oxford Handbook to Philosophical Theology, eds. Thomas P. Flint and Michael C. Rea (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 105-128.

Dr. Brower is an Associate Professor of Philosophy at Purdue University. His research focuses on metaphysics, medieval philosophy, and philosophy of religion. He is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Aquinas on Material Objects.

Hud Hudson for "Omnipresence," in The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology, eds. Thomas P. Flint and Michael C. Rea (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009), pp. 199-216.

Dr. Hudson is Professor and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Western Washington University, where he has taught for the last 20 years. His publications include Kant's Compatibilism (Cornell 1994), A Materialist Metaphysics of the Human Person (Cornell 2001), and The Metaphysics of Hyperspace (Oxford 2006) as well as three dozen articles in his main areas of specialization: Metaphysics, Philosophy of Religion, Ethics, and Kant Studies.

Wes Morriston for "What if God commanded something terrible?: A worry for divine-command meta-ethics," Religious Studies 45:3 (Sept. 2009): 249-267.

Dr. Morriston is a Professor of Philosophy at the University of Colorado, Boulder. He is the author of over 25 articles in the philosophy of religion and has won several awards for his teaching.

Questions on either prize can be directed to Dr. Michael Rota at ustphilrel@stthomas.edu.