Joshua Stuchlik

Associate Professor of Philosophy
Degree
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 2011
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 2006
B.A., University of Notre Dame, 2004, summa cum laude
Office
JRC 216a
Phone
(651) 962-5361
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5361
Fax
(651) 962.5340
Mail
University of St. Thomas, JRC 241
2115 Summit Avenue
Saint Paul, MN 55105

Academic history
Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 2011
Dissertation: "Reason's Self-Actualization: An Essay on Self-Consciousness and Rational Agency"; Director: John McDowell
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 2006
B.A., University of Notre Dame, 2004, summa cum laude
 
Areas of Specialization 
Practical Philosophy (Ethics/Action Theory), Epistemology, and their histories
Areas of Competence
History of Philosophy, Political Philosophy
 

Publications
"Circling to Scientia: Reading Descartes in Light of the Debate between Stoic Dogmatists and Academic Skeptics," Journal of the History of Philosophy, forthcoming.

"Epistemological Disjunctivism and Easy Knowledge," Synthese, 192, 2015, 2647-65.

"From Volitionalism to the Dual Aspect Theory of Action," Philosophia, 41, 2013, 867-86.

"A Critique of Scanlon on Double Effect," The Journal of Moral Philosophy, 9, 2012, 178-99.

"Felicitology: Neurath's Naturalization of Ethics," HOPOS: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Science, 1, 2011, 183-208.

"Not All Worlds are Stages," Philosophical Studies 116, 2003, 309-21.
 

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - 02 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 205
CRN: 20226 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joshua M. Stuchlik An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 09 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 247
CRN: 22194 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joshua M. Stuchlik An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 306 - 02 Contemporary Philosophy M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 205
CRN: 20505 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joshua M. Stuchlik An investigation of major philosophical problems from the late nineteenth century to the present, with a focus on prominent philosophers, including thinkers from both the analytic and continental traditions. Prerequisite: PHIL 220

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)