Jonathan E. Stoltz

Associate Professor of Philosophy
Degree
B.A., Philosophy and Mathematics, Bucknell University, 1998
M.A., Philosophy, University of Virginia, 2002
PhD., Philosophy, University of Virginia, 2005
Office
JRC 213
Phone
(651) 962-5366
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5366
Fax
(651) 962-5340
Mail
University of St. Thomas, JRC 241
2115 Summit Avenue
Saint Paul, MN 55105

Academic History
B.A., Philosophy and Mathematics, Bucknell University, 1998
M.A., Philosophy, University of Virginia, 2002
PhD., Philosophy, University of Virginia, 2005

Expertise
Philosophy of Logic
Indian/Tibetan Buddhist Philosophy
Epistemology

Selected Publications
"Buddhist Epistemology: The Study of Pramana," Religion Compass 3 (2009), 537-548

"Concepts, Intention, and Identity in Tibetan Philosophy of Language," Journal of the International Association of Buddhist Studies 29 (2008), 383-400

"Gettier and Factivity in Indo-Tibetan Epistemology," The Philosophical Quarterly 57 (2007), 
394-415

"Sakya Pandita and the Status of Concepts," Philosophy East & West 56 (2006), 567-582

Selected Presentations
"Tibetan Polyandry and the Intersection of Ethics and Economics" --10th East-West Philosophers' Conference, University of Hawai'i: May 2011

"Gendun Chopel on the Status of Madhyamaka: Truth, Knowledge, and Testimony" --12th Seminar of the International Association for Tibetan Studies, University of British Columbia: August 2010

"Testimonial Knowledge and Word Meaning in Indo-Tibetan Epistemology" --Columbia Society for Comparative Philosophy, Columbia University: March 2010

"Knowledge by Testimony in the Buddhist Intellectual Tradition" --St. Cloud State University: March 2010

"Intension and Identity in Pre-Geluk Tibetan Philosophy of Language"--APA Eastern Division Meeting, Group Program, International Society for Buddhist Philosophy: December, 2006

"The Fact of the Matter about Indicative Conditionals"--Washington & Lee University: February, 2005

"The Weakness of Gibbardian Stand-offs"--APA Eastern Division Meeting, Main Program, Philosophical Logic Colloquium: December, 2004

Professional Memberships
American Academy of Religion
American Philosophical Association 
International Association of Buddhist Studies

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - 03 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 201
CRN: 42596 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jonathan E. Stoltz An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 05 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 205
CRN: 41153 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jonathan E. Stoltz An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 330 - 01 Philosophy of Mind M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 209
CRN: 42647 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jonathan E. Stoltz A study of central issues in the philosophy of mind and soul. Possible topics include the relation between mind and body; the senses, emotions, intellect and will; personal identity. Attention will be given to both the Aristotelian/Thomistic tradition and contemporary philosophy. Prerequisites: PHIL 115 and 220 or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
PHIL 115 - 04 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 206
CRN: 20338 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jonathan E. Stoltz An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 115 - 12 Philosophy of Human Person M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 205
CRN: 22196 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jonathan E. Stoltz An examination of fundamental conceptions of the human person in ancient, medieval and modern philosophy. Possible topics include: the existence and immortality of the human soul, free will and determinism, the immateriality of the intellect, the relationship between mind and body, and the relevance of different conceptions of the human person for ethics and religion. Attention is given to relevant issues of human diversity. The development of logical and critical thinking receives special attention. This course, with PHIL 214, fulfills the Moral and Philosophical Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PHIL 380 - 01 Epistemology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 206
CRN: 20442 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jonathan E. Stoltz This course considers various accounts of the nature, origin, and limits of human knowledge. Attention will be paid to the main figures in the Western tradition as well as to contemporary authors. Prerequisite: PHIL 220

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)