Spring 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BETH 301 - 01 Business Ethics M - W - - - - 1315 - 1455 SCH 421

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1315 - 1455

Location:

SCH 421

Course Registration Number:

21913 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Christopher M. Michaelson

This course plays a critical role in the principle-based education of St. Thomas business students, especially in introducing the responsibilities of a business professional. Through analysis of case studies, readings and other experiential exercises, students will develop an understanding of professional business conduct and judgment grounded in moral principles. This course is a pre-requisite for all 400 level business courses. Prerequisites: Junior standing and BLAW 301 or 302 or 303 or 304 and four additional credits from ACCT, OPMT, FINC, MGMT, or MKTG

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 207 - 01 Genetics Ecology Evolution - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 257

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OWS 257

Course Registration Number:

21078 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

A consideration of the mechanisms of heredity, evolution, population genetics, and population ecology emphasizing hypothesis testing, case studies, and quantitative and experimental approaches to population biology. Topics include: Mendelian genetics, genetic mapping, population genetics, selection theory and the process of adaptation, speciation, macroevolution and phylogenetics, and the growth and regulation of populations. Laboratory work emphasizes techniques for data analysis, including computer simulation and modeling. Three laboratory hours per week. This course fulfills the core-area in natural science in the Natural Science and Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning requirements in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: Co-enrollment in or previous credit for CHEM 111 or CHEM 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 315 - 51 Plants, Food and Medicine/Lab - - W - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 379

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 379

Course Registration Number:

22157 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Amy S. Verhoeven

This course explores the biology of plants from the perspective of our use of plants as a source of food and medicine. Major topics include the overall structure and function of plants, the diversity of plants, and the role of plants as a food source, as well as a source of medicine. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 315 - L01 Plants, Food and Medicine M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OSS 122

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OSS 122

Course Registration Number:

22156 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy S. Verhoeven

This course explores the biology of plants from the perspective of our use of plants as a source of food and medicine. Major topics include the overall structure and function of plants, the diversity of plants, and the role of plants as a food source, as well as a source of medicine. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 328 - 01 Environ.Toxicology & Health - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OWS 250

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OWS 250

Course Registration Number:

22154 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Dalma Martinovic, Jennifer T. McGuire

There is increasing public interest and concern over the connections between environmental quality and human health. This course will explore these connections by providing an introduction to the multidisciplinary field of environmental toxicology- the study of the adverse effects of chemical, biological, and physical agents in the environment on living organisms, including humans. Topics will cover global and local problems including issues of environmental justice and future approaches to sustainably mitigate the major environmental health problems in industrialized and developing countries. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207, BIOL 208 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 01 Ecology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OWS 275

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

OWS 275

Course Registration Number:

22216 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 51 Ecology/Lab M - - - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 268

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 268

Course Registration Number:

22217 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 52 Ecology/Lab - - W - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 268

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 268

Course Registration Number:

22218 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 333 - 53 Ecology / Lab - - - R - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 268

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 268

Course Registration Number:

22484 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Leah M. Domine

This course is an exploration of the major concepts in modern ecology, including eco-physiology and adaptation, population growth and regulation, community and ecosystem ecology, and biodiversity and conservation biology. Laboratory and fieldwork will complement these topics and will emphasize careful experimental design and statistical analysis of data. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite: BIOL 207 and a minimum grade of C- in BIOL 209. STAT 220 or MATH 303 recommended.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 490 - 01 Urban Ecosystem Ecology - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OSS 127

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

22152 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gaston E. Small

In 1800, there were around 1 billion people on the planet, and only 3% lived in urban areas. Today we are approaching 8 billion humans, and more than half live in cities. This course explores how cities function as ecosystems and shape local, regional, and global ecological and biogeochemical processes We will examine how carbon, nutrients, and energy enter the city in the form of food and other resources, and exit as waste, and use assess opportunities to move towards sustainability. We will make extensive use of primary literature and apply ecological network analysis tools to contrast human-dominated ecosystems with natural ecosystems. Students will design and implement independent research projects, and will work collaboratively to apply knowledge and skills to real-world urban sustainability problems.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 490 - 51 Urban Ecosystem Ecology/Lab - T - - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 268

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 268

Course Registration Number:

22153 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Gaston E. Small

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CHEM 101 - 01 Environmental Chemistry - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OSS 127

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

OSS 127

Course Registration Number:

20018 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Daniel A. Tobin

An introduction to chemistry with particular emphasis on environmental science. Basic chemistry topics covered include the structure of matter, elements, compounds, reactions, energy and energy changes. These fundamentals lead to the study of currently relevant environmental problems and their proposed solutions, for example the depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, global warming, acid rain, smog, waste disposal, water pollution and the study of energy resources. Lectures and laboratory. This course satisfies the lab science requirement in the core curriculum for non-majors. Offered spring semester. NOTE: Students who receive credit for CHEM 101 may not receive credit for CHEM 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
CHEM 101 - 51 Environmental Chemistry/Lab - - W - - - - 0830 - 1130 OWS 479

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

0830 - 1130

Location:

OWS 479

Course Registration Number:

20019 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Daniel A. Tobin

An introduction to chemistry with particular emphasis on environmental science. Basic chemistry topics covered include the structure of matter, elements, compounds, reactions, energy and energy changes. These fundamentals lead to the study of currently relevant environmental problems and their proposed solutions, for example the depletion of ozone in the stratosphere, global warming, acid rain, smog, waste disposal, water pollution and the study of energy resources. Lectures and laboratory. This course satisfies the lab science requirement in the core curriculum for non-majors. Offered spring semester. NOTE: Students who receive credit for CHEM 101 may not receive credit for CHEM 100.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 100 - 01 Public Speaking M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 BEC 114

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

BEC 114

Course Registration Number:

20565 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

Preparation, presentation, and evaluation of original speeches by each student throughout the semester; special emphasis given to selecting and researching topics, organizing evidence, analyzing audiences, sharpening style and tone, communicating ethically and listening critically. This course is designed for students who are not pursuing a Communication and Journalism major. COJO majors may only take this course with permission from the department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 100 - 03 Public Speaking - - W - - - - 1800 - 2130 BEC 113

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2130

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

20567 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Debra L. Petersen

Preparation, presentation, and evaluation of original speeches by each student throughout the semester; special emphasis given to selecting and researching topics, organizing evidence, analyzing audiences, sharpening style and tone, communicating ethically and listening critically. This course is designed for students who are not pursuing a Communication and Journalism major. COJO majors may only take this course with permission from the department chair.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 258 - 01 Writing/Designing for the Web M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 312

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 312

Course Registration Number:

20584 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John C. Keston

This course teaches students HTML and Web-page production. The goal is to help students develop strategies for writing, editing, designing and publishing a Website that meets professional standards.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 258 - 02 Writing/Designing for the Web - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 312

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 312

Course Registration Number:

20585 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

John C. Keston

This course teaches students HTML and Web-page production. The goal is to help students develop strategies for writing, editing, designing and publishing a Website that meets professional standards.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 344 - 01 Writing for Strategic Comm M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 312

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 312

Course Registration Number:

22433 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Craig E. Bryan

Writing for Strategic Communication provides practical experience in public relations and advertising writing including: strategic communication plans, news releases, position statements, brochures, query letters, feature stories, social media posts and ad copy. The course emphasizes weekly drafting and editing in class with the aim of giving students the fundamental skills that constitute excellent writing. Students leave the course with a portfolio of written work that can be utilized in multiple communication environments (agencies, corporations, non-profits, political, education, healthcare organizations, etc.). Prerequisite: COJO 234

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 372 - 01 Environmental Communication M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 BEC 113

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

BEC 113

Course Registration Number:

21657 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Mark R. Neuzil

This course focuses on the communication of mediated information about the environment. Students will examine what makes (and what has made) the environmental stories we tell about ourselves, from writing about agriculture, nature and spirituality to green advertising, the rhetoric of the environmental movement, and environmental movies and music. Prerequisite: COJO 111 or permission of instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
COJO 470 - 01 Strategic Comm Campaigns - - - R - - - 1800 - 2130 OEC 206

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2130

Location:

OEC 206

Course Registration Number:

20591 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul G. Omodt

Students work as strategic communicators in advertising and public relations to develop an integrated communication campaign plan that will successfully influence key audiences' attitudes and behaviors for the ultimate goal of building and maintaining good relationships with audiences' key audiences. Prerequisites: COJO 344

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ECON 370 - 01 Envr & Nat Resource Econ - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 208

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 208

Course Registration Number:

22463 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

James Vincent

This course employs economic principles to analyze the problems of environmental pollution and natural-resource depletion. Economic systems, such as the private-market mechanism, are evaluated with respect to their effectiveness in the management of natural resources and the environment. Domestic and international environmental policies are examined and critiqued. Prerequisite: ECON 252

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - PW1 Native Lit and the Environment M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

22172 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - W01 Native Lit and the Environment M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

22171 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views, with an emphasis on Minnesota Native nations. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting Dream of Wild Health indigenous farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook ORIGINAL LOCAL: INDIGENOUS FOOD, STORIES, AND RECIPES FROM THE UPPER MIDWEST (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author); BRAIDING SWEETGRASS, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman who is also a biology professor; and the novel SOLAR STORMS by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. Other possible texts include poetry from Leslie Marmon Silko, Joy Harjo, and others; William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe”; and selections from Winona LaDuke’s ALL MY RELATIONS, David Treuer’s REZ LIFE, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s GOD IS RED. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W11 American Idealism - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

22266 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Lucy A. Saliger

Freedom, democracy, equality, and progress: in this course, we will examine these long-standing ideals, reading texts which exemplify, examine, and sometimes overtly argue for particular versions of these idealized concepts. At the same time, we will work to recognize other ideals bound to those aims, including the profound idealism permeating an ethic and lived practice of care and relationship. Of particular concern this semester is care as stewardship – a long-term relationship with and responsibility to current and future fellow earth inhabitants as well as the ecosystems that nourish us all. Our course materials will reveal a multitude of ideals and explore relationships between people, the places they inhabit or travel through, and particular ecosystem elements (especially water, whether that be Thoreau’s Walden Pond or the Mississippi River where Huck and Jim find intermittent freedom and the space to build friendship). This course will also connect us to our Mississippi River, community urban farming, and people active in stewardship efforts involving both. Further into the semester, students will engage in hands on work alongside community workers, learning to compost, start seeds, harvest early greens, or engage in similar activities that perpetuate healthier life-cycles for us all. This helps us learn from and assist community members who have long been engaged in this work. Students’ later writing project will reflect on these experiences and communicate with the community workers and Mississippi Watershed Management Organization (MWMO), thus forging and nurturing multiple connections. These experiences help us recognize the falseness of the dichotomy between writing and ‘really doing something,' realizing that our hands-on community work feeds and is fed by reflecting on that work in our writing, then amplified again by sharing that writing with classmates as well as community organizations and our university. Authors may include: Frederick Douglass, Henry David Thoreau, Mark Twain, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Langston Hughes, Angela Davis, Francisco Jimenez, and Ta-Nehisi Coates. This course requires community engagement participation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 325 - W01 Topic: Ethnographic Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 305

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

22182 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

In this course we will investigate the difficulties, complexities, and limits of ethnography – the attempt to represent culture – by exploring questions such as: What are the limits of representation? Is objectivity possible? What are the ethical responsibilities of writing about others? How do we do ethnography without exploiting research “subjects”? Should ethnography be done at all? In pursuing these questions we will engage ethnographic theory of the last forty years from the disciplines of anthropology, sociology, and folklore, focusing on the ethical turn from ethnography’s colonialist past to a more self-aware, reflexive, and reciprocal ethnography. In addition to looking at various theories about ethnography, we'll also sample ethnographies of the 20th century – from Bronislaw Malinowski to Alice Goffman – paying close attention as well to experimental fiction, non-fiction, and filmed works by Zora Neale Hurston, Karen McCarthy Brown, and others – ultimately posing the questions: what counts as ethnography, and what are the possibilities for it? Student ethnographers in this course will work on community-engaged qualitative research projects during the second half of the semester. Projects will likely focus on issues of sustainability, urban farming, land access, food justice and traditions, and/or new immigrant experience. Interdisciplinary in scope, this course should be of special interest to students in COJO, Sociology, English, Social Work, Art History, Geography, and Justice and Peace Studies. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement and the writing distribution requirement for English majors under undergraduate catalogs prior to Fall 2015. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. Please note that this course does not count towards the core literature and writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENTR 490 - 01 Envr Sustainability Innovation - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MCH 118

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

MCH 118

Course Registration Number:

21947 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Annmarie P. Thomas

An elective course designed to introduce students to the role of environmental sustainability in product development. This course will look at ways that a wide variety of companies have adopted environmentally sustainable practices, and we will practice using methods such as life cycle analysis and whole system thinking. Students will learn and use an array of design thinking techniques. All students will be expected to complete a final project in which they work in a team to write a proposal for a business based on sustainable principles. Prerequisite: ENTR 200 or ENGR 150 or Instructor Permission.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENVR 151 - 01 Environmental Sustainability M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 401

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

0935 - 1040

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

20111 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul A. Lorah

A study of the interaction of humans and the environment over time and space; a broad introduction that integrates a variety of social-science perspectives into an understanding of the environment and the relations between humans and nature. Specific topics include ecology, population, economic development, resources and sustainable development.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENVR 401 - 01 Field Seminar - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 401

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

20429 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David W. Kelley

A capstone course that combines field experience with classroom seminar. Student teams will conduct collaborative broadly interdisciplinary analyses of selected environmental problems. Field-based projects are chosen by the students in consultation with course instructor. Classroom seminars are used for exchange of information between teams and for discussion of readings pertinent to individual research projects or, more broadly, to the interdisciplinary character of environmental problem-solving. Each team produces a major paper that examines the selected problems through humanities, natural-science and social-science lenses. This class is cross-listed with, and is equivalent to, GEOG 402. Prerequisite: 301 and 351 or permission of the instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 310 - 01 Environmental Problem Solving M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OWS 264

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OWS 264

Course Registration Number:

20829 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Gaston E. Small

This course explores methods of solving environmental problems. These problems are by nature, interdisciplinary and are rarely addressed in a substantive fashion in traditional science textbooks. In this course, students and faculty work together to develop a working model of a critical earth system or biogeochemical cycle (i.e. the carbon or nitrogen cycle), and learn how to make calculations of human-induced changes to that system. Students from all concentrations of the environmental science major will work together on this interdisciplinary research project using modeling and systems analysis software to more fully understand specific environments and the quantitative methods of assessing challenges to those environments. This course should be taken by all ESCI students during their junior year. Prerequisite: Environmental Science majors should have completed BIOL 204, CHEM 201, or GEOL 211/252. Environmental Studies (ENVR) majors that wish to take this course need to have completed one course each from BIOL, CHEM and GEOL.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 310 - 51 Envi. Problem Solving Lab - - - R - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 250

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1730

Location:

OWS 250

Course Registration Number:

21069 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Gaston E. Small

This course explores methods of solving environmental problems. These problems are by nature, interdisciplinary and are rarely addressed in a substantive fashion in traditional science textbooks. In this course, students and faculty work together to develop a working model of a critical earth system or biogeochemical cycle (i.e. the carbon or nitrogen cycle), and learn how to make calculations of human-induced changes to that system. Students from all concentrations of the environmental science major will work together on this interdisciplinary research project using modeling and systems analysis software to more fully understand specific environments and the quantitative methods of assessing challenges to those environments. This course should be taken by all ESCI students during their junior year. Prerequisite: Environmental Science majors should have completed BIOL 204, CHEM 201, or GEOL 211/252. Environmental Studies (ENVR) majors that wish to take this course need to have completed one course each from BIOL, CHEM and GEOL.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 430 - 01 Senior Research Seminar M - - - F - - 1330 - 1530 OSS 120

Days of Week:

M - - - F - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1530

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

21239 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Kevin M. Theissen

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science as it brings together students from all of the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects. In the semester prior to the course offering, Environmental Science majors, in consultation with their faculty advisors and the course instructor, will develop a research project that they will complete as part of this course. Students may also choose to more fully develop a research project in which they have been participating or propose a service-learning or community-based project. Furthermore, groups of students could propose to perform an interdisciplinary project. The format of this research is intentionally open-ended because it is meant to provide flexibility and choice to the students and the course instructor. Student-led seminars on topics of the students' choosing will comprise most weekly meetings, along with updates on research progress and a final presentation to the St. Thomas community on the outcome of the student's research projects. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor, and at least one ENVR course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 430 - 51 Senior Research Seminar/Lab M - - - - - - 1531 - 1745 OSS 120

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1531 - 1745

Location:

OSS 120

Course Registration Number:

22611 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Thomas A. Hickson

This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science as it brings together students from all of the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects. In the semester prior to the course offering, Environmental Science majors, in consultation with their faculty advisors and the course instructor, will develop a research project that they will complete as part of this course. Students may also choose to more fully develop a research project in which they have been participating or propose a service-learning or community-based project. Furthermore, groups of students could propose to perform an interdisciplinary project. The format of this research is intentionally open-ended because it is meant to provide flexibility and choice to the students and the course instructor. Student-led seminars on topics of the students' choosing will comprise most weekly meetings, along with updates on research progress and a final presentation to the St. Thomas community on the outcome of the student's research projects. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor, and at least one ENVR course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOG 111 - 01 Human Geography M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 401

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

21057 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul A. Lorah

This course explores the effects of social, economic, environmental, political, and demographic change from a geographic perspective. It introduces students to a broad range of topics, including the effects of population growth, human impact on the environment, economic development, and globalization. Offered every semester. This course fulfills the Social Analysis and Human Diversity requirements in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOG 331 - L01 Conservation Geography - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 426

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 426

Course Registration Number:

21243 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Paul A. Lorah

This course uses basic Geographic Information Systems (GIS) to study a wide range of conservation issues. GIS is ideal platform for exploring the relationships between the economic, political and environmental processes shaping our landscapes. Typical class projects include locating the best lands in Minnesota for carbon sequestration projects and helping the Minnesota Nature Conservancy target valuable forest habitat for conservation purchases.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOG 421 - 01 Applied Geographic Info Sys - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 426

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

JRC 426

Course Registration Number:

22423 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

David W. Kelley

A sequel to GEOG 321, this project-based course is designed around individual student interests to utilize advanced ArcGIS functions and analysis. Principles of geographic information systems will be implemented in a wide variety of applications. Prerequisite: GEOG 321 or consent of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 01 Intro Physical Geology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OWS 150

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1055 - 1200

Location:

OWS 150

Course Registration Number:

21062 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rebecca Clotts

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 111 - 02 Intro Physical Geology M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 OWS LL54

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1730 - 1915

Location:

OWS LL54

Course Registration Number:

21065 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Rebecca Clotts

A study of the Earth's properties; the formation and classification of minerals, rocks, ore deposits, and fuels; and the nature and origin of the Earth's surface and interior. Emphasis will be placed upon a changing Earth, and the geologic processes operating at the surface and in the interior. Lecture and two laboratory hours per week. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 111 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 114, or 115.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0800 - 0940

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

22254 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - W05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 222

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

JRC 222

Course Registration Number:

22255 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Elizabeth A. Harry

The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 386 - L01 Historical Archaeology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 SCB 107

Days of Week:

M - W - F - -

Time of Day:

1215 - 1320

Location:

SCB 107

Course Registration Number:

22238 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Ivancica D. Schrunk

The course offers an understanding of archaeological theories, methods, and interpretations in discovering, reconstructing, and understanding past societies in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, and Europe. Archaeology primarily deals with material remains of societies and time periods that lack written documents. Historical archaeology combines the methods of archaeology with analysis of written and oral sources. Together, archaeology and history provide a critical reappraisal of historical events and cultural change around the world. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
JPST 250 - L02 Intro to Justice & Peace - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 305

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

OEC 305

Course Registration Number:

21242 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Michael C. Klein

Major aspects of world and local conflict, theories of social science relating to conflict and violence, and various proposals for solutions. Among the aspects of conflict studied are cultural differences, scarcity of resources, economic and social structures, international trade, the arms race, corruption, oppression and war. Proposed solutions assessed include development, structural changes, world governance, multinational agencies, military power, civilian-based defense, active nonviolence for social change, conflict resolution, disarmament, cultural exchange, religious revival and prayer. These topics are considered in the light of theory, history, and literature. Students apply these concepts by investigating one country or geographic area in depth through a semester long research project. Usually offered every semester. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
MGMT 430 - D01 International Management - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 110

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

MCH 110

Course Registration Number:

21989 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Mary M. Maloney

Managers operating in a global environment need to manage the differences in doing business with people from other cultures. This goes beyond knowing that people have different customs, goals, and thought patterns. Today's managers need to be able to understand the cross-cultural subtleties imbedded in any interpersonal working relationships, regardless of whether operating in a foreign location, interacting with foreign nationals from a distance, or working with a culturally diverse American workforce. A manager's ability to understand, accept, and embrace these differences is critical to his or her success. This course is designed to address the complexities of intercultural management and facilitate the student's ability to manage successfully in a cross-cultural environment. Topics include intercultural ethics, intercultural negotiations, and work values. Prerequisites: FINC 321, OPMT 310, MKTG 300 or concurrent registration and prerequisite waived by instructor, MGMT 305, BETH 301

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
POLS 298 - 02 Topics: Global Envr Politics M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

MHC 202

Course Registration Number:

22516 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Chase Hobbs-Morgan

In Global Environmental Politics we will 1) seek to understand different philosophical and cultural approaches to the environment; 2) examine major environmental problems that humans are facing at the global level; and 3) look at actual and potential solutions to these problems. As such, the course will speak to a wide variety of concerns and interests. I hope you'll consider taking the course whether you are primarily interested in the environment itself, in international relations, or in fostering solutions to problems like global climate change, food insecurity, pollution, and beyond.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 298 - 01 Topics: Psyc of Sustainability M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC LL01

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC LL01

Course Registration Number:

21766 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Britain A. Scott

The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 313 - 01 Psychological Testing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC LL45

Days of Week:

M - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1335 - 1510

Location:

JRC LL45

Course Registration Number:

20293 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Tonia S. Bock

This course provides an overview of the principles of testing and measurement, particularly as they relate to the practice of psychology and education. The course examines the theories underlying individual and group-administered tests in such areas as intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interests, personality, neuropsychological and educational tests. Various controversial issues in the field of testing will also be addressed including ethics, bias, computer-based assessment, and testing of special populations. Counts toward fulfilling the Psychology major lab course requirement. Prerequisite: PSYC 212

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
PSYC 313 - 51 Psychological Testing Lab - - W - - - - 1525 - 1725 JRC LL45

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1725

Location:

JRC LL45

Course Registration Number:

21053 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

0

Instructor:

Tonia S. Bock

This course provides an overview of the principles of testing and measurement, particularly as they relate to the practice of psychology and education. The course examines the theories underlying individual and group-administered tests in such areas as intelligence, aptitude, achievement, interests, personality, neuropsychological and educational tests. Various controversial issues in the field of testing will also be addressed including ethics, bias, computer-based assessment, and testing of special populations. Counts toward fulfilling the Psychology major lab course requirement. Prerequisite: PSYC 212

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 211 - L07 Intermediate Spanish I - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OSS LL18

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OSS LL18

Course Registration Number:

20322 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susana Perez Castillejo

Designed to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Intensive review of grammatical structures of Elementary Spanish I and II. Continued exposure to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 or its equivalent with a grade of C- or better

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 211 - L12 Intermediate Spanish I - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 319

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1330 - 1510

Location:

OEC 319

Course Registration Number:

20991 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Susana Perez Castillejo

Designed to increase listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills in Spanish. Intensive review of grammatical structures of Elementary Spanish I and II. Continued exposure to Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 112 or its equivalent with a grade of C- or better

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
SPAN 301 - D01 Adv Written Spanish & Culture - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 318

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

0955 - 1135

Location:

OEC 318

Course Registration Number:

20487 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Jane D. Tar

Intensive practice in written Spanish using selected materials to acquire a high level of competence in writing Spanish. This writing course aims to improve technique, expand syntactic depth, increase vocabulary and learn good writing through a process approach involving stages of idea development, thesis construction, structural development, bibliographic notation, evaluation of ideas and rewriting of the text. Lectures and class discussions are based on major topics that relate to the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Written skills will be assessed. Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 300 or its equivalent with a C- or better.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 459 - 01 Theology & Environment - - - R - - - 1800 - 2130 OSS 123

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2130

Location:

OSS 123

Course Registration Number:

22510 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Cara L. Anthony, Thomas A. Hickson

This course examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 459 - L01 Theology & Environment - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 201

Days of Week:

- T - R - - -

Time of Day:

1525 - 1700

Location:

JRC 201

Course Registration Number:

22511 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

4

Instructor:

Amy M. Levad

This course examines Christian theological and moral reflection on the relation between human activity and the natural environment. It will address environmental issues that are of mutual concern to theologians and the natural or social sciences; thus it will study scientific analysis along with theological perspectives. The course will also review contemporary practices and/or policies that address environmental problems. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term Study Abroad in Hawaii

Multi-Cultural Communication in Diverse Organizations (COJO 370) | Instructor: Debra Petersen

Course description: We will examine the concepts, theories, and realities of the way individuals and groups work and communicate in organizations where culture and multiculturalism play a primary or prominent role. Each year we partner with the Ke Kula Ni’ihau O' Kekaha Learning Center (KKNOK) to create a reciprocal service-learning experience on an environmental theme that meets the curricular needs of their forty students (pre-school - high school) and the learning objectives of our course. Previous activities with KKNOK include learning about an endangered Hawaiian duck—the kaloa maoli--in 2010.  We contributed to the production of a dvd that features the art, music and literature projects on which our students and their students collaborated.  They continue to use this dvd to educate Hawaiians about endangered species and to showcase their unique school at Hawai’i state education meetings. In 2014 our students and the KKNOK students learned about various aspects of the Waimea River, including ecological challenges to the river and surrounding watershed. Highlights included a presentation by an elder at the Waimea Technology Center and a day on and around the river in which the Kekaha students and our students taught others about the history and environmental challenges of this area. 

The course is highlighted in this PBS video about the KKNOK Learning Center, at 14:40.

Term offered: J-term 2017 as a Study Abroad program in Hawaii

CRN: not available, see the Study Abroad website for course details