Dr. Thomas Bushlack

Dr. Thomas Bushlack, Theology Department, College of Arts and Sciences, is the author of an article, “The Age of Skepticism: The Challenge of Relevance in a Quickly Changing Culture,” published in the journal America, 208:4 (Feb. 11).

Dr. Michael Hollerich, Theology Department, College of Arts and Sciences, is the author of “Taking Exception: Paul Kahn Rocks the Liberal Boat,” published in the December 2012 issue of Political Theology, vol. 13, no. 6, 689-692.

Dr. Catherine Marrs Fuchsel

Blaire Hysjulien, a master’s in social work student graduating this May, is co-author, with Dr. Catherine Marrs Fuchsel, School of Social Work, of two publications: “Familism, Sexual Abuse, and Domestic Violence Among Immigrant Mexican Women” (in Affilia: Social Work Journal for Women, in press) and “Exploring a Domestic Violence Intervention Curriculum for Immigrant Mexican Women in a Group Setting: A Pilot Study” (in Social Work With Groups, in press). Hysjulien has been Marrs Fuchsel’s research assistant since fall 2011. Their project examines a Domestic Violence Intervention Model (DVIM) curriculum for use among immigrant Mexican women. They are evaluating the DVIM curriculum in a 12-week, psycho-educational group format. Each week, the participants learn a different topic related to self-esteem, healthy relationships, prevention of domestic violence, and accessing resources and services in the community. They have been collecting group data for almost two years, with the fourth group conducted this spring. Hysjulien has conducted literature reviews, analyzed data, created tables and created a Power Point presentation.

Dr. David Kelley

Dr. David Kelley and Dr. Paul Lorah, Geography Department, College of Arts and Sciences, are co-authors of an article, “The USA’s Most Pain-in-the-A#% Geocache,” published in the December 2012 issue of FTF Geocacher magazine. Kelley and Lorah used computer modeling to identify the most remote, inaccessible location in the coterminous United States where a geocache could be placed and earn the dubious title of Most Pain-in-the-A#% Geocache.

Dr. Anne Klejment

Dr. Anne Klejment, History Department, College of Arts and Sciences, is the author of two encyclopedia entries in Asian and Pacific Islander Americans, edited by Gary Okihiro and published in print and electronic versions. Klejment’s entries focus on former Minnesota state legislator Mee Moua and writer and philanthropist Le Ly Hayslip.

Dr. Kim Vrudny.

Dr. Kimberly Vrudny, Theology Department, College of Arts and Sciences, is the author of a book chapter, “Religion, Ethics, and AIDS,” published in Religious and Ethical Perspectives for the Twenty-First Century, Paul O. Myhre, ed., (Winona: Anselm Academic, 2013), 112-139.

Dr. Marty Warren, English Department, College of Arts and Sciences, was the guest speaker on Healing Journeys on A2zen.fm radio Jan. 10. Warren’s topic was “Practical Mysticism: Grappling With the World.” The description of the topic was as follows: “Too often, mystics are characterized as very private people, set apart from the rest of the community, engaged in some kind of esoteric experience that the rest of us cannot understand and that has little to do with us. But in reality, the mystic is very much connected to the larger body of the community, not withdrawing from responsibilities. Mysticism confronts institutional religion’s fascination with what the medieval mystic Meister Eckhart calls “book-learning” and challenges religions to offer their members ‘life-learning.’ Three 20th-century mystics − Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Dorothy Day, and Etty Hillesum − who wrestled with the gritty realities of existence, present us with an active mysticism that engages life with hope.”

Dr. Scott Wright

Dr. Scott Wright, Professor Emeritus, History Department, College of Arts and Sciences, is the author of essays on Joseph Heco and Fred Korematsu in Great Lives From History: Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders (Ipswich, MA: Salem Press, 2013).