Dr. Mark DelCogliano, adjunct professor of Theology, College of Arts and Sciences, is the author of “The Promotion of the Constantinian Agenda in Eusebius of Caesarea’s On the Feast of Pascha,” in Sabrina Inowlocki and Claudio Zamagni (eds.), Reconsidering Eusebius: Collected Papers on Literary, Historical, and Theological Issues. Vigiliae Christianae Supplements 107 (Leiden: Brill, 2011), 39–68.

Dr. Lorina Quartarone, Department of Modern and Classical Languages, attended the “Symposium Cumanum,” the annual conference of the Vergilian Society in Cuma, Italy in June. There she presented a paper, “Shifting Shadows on the Landscape: Reading umbrae in Vergil and other poets” to an audience of international Vergil scholars. The paper focuses on Vergil’s creation of tension and recognition of natural cycles through representations of shade, shadows and darkness in his poetry. Immediately after the conference, Quartarone flew to Wenatchee, Wash., and spent 10 days at the Conventiculum Vasintoniense, a workshop where participants engage in a variety of activities, from viewing films to hiking in the mountains, while communicating only in Latin.