Dr. Massimo Faggioli, College of Arts and Sciences (Theology Department), is the author of “Die kulturelle und politische Relevanz des II. Vatikanischen Konzils als konstitutiver Faktor der Interpretation,” (“The Cultural and Political Relevance of Council Vatican II As a Constitutive Factor of Interpretation”), in Exkommunikation oder Kommunikation? Der Weg der Kirche nach dem II. Vatikanum und die Pius-Brüder, (Excommunication or Communication? The Way of the Church after Vatican II and the Lefebvrians), (Series “Quaestiones Disputatae” 236), Hrsg. Peter Hünermann, Herder: Freiburg i.B., 2009, pp. 153-174).

Dr. Joe Fitzharris, College of Arts and Sciences (History Department), received the Larry Rowen Remele Service Award Oct. 16 from the Northern Great Plains History Conference. Established by the Northern Great Plains History Conference to honor the memory of Larry Rowen Remele, this award is presented annually to an individual who has made significant contributions to the betterment of the conference. Fitzharris also presented a paper, “The Crittenden Court of Inquiry and Historical Accuracy: Murfreesboro, TN, 13 July 1862″ in the session on “Media and Manipulation of Perception.” He organized the sessions sponsored by the Society for Military History, to include papers, reception, luncheon, tour and dinner.

Dr. Terence Nichols, College of Arts and Sciences (Theology Department), is the author of Religion and the Implications of Radical Life Extension, edited by Derek F. Maher and Calvin Mercer, (Palgrave Macmillan 2009). Nichols wrote Chapter 11, titled “Radical Life Extension:  Implications for Roman Catholicism.”

Dr. Britain Scott, College of Arts and Sciences (Psychology Department), is a co-author of a new appendix, “Psychology and Sustainability: Conservation Psychology,” for author Wayne Weiten’s Psychology: Themes and Variations (8th Edition, Briefer Version), one of the most widely used general psychology textbooks. At the August meeting of the American Psychological Association, Scott presented the results of a conservation psychology research collaboration with undergraduate Cheryl Koerner, titled “Self-Objectification, Nature-Connection, and Women’s Environmental Behavior.”

Dr. Lisa Waldner, College of Arts and Sciences (Sociology and Criminal Justice Department), is the co-author of “Authentic Self-Expression: Gender, Ethnicity, and Culture,” to be published in Silencing the Self Across Cultures: Depression and Gender in the Social World (Oxford University Press, 2010).

Dr. Fred Zimmerman, School of Engineering (retired), is the author of “Engine Technology, Development: What it Means to Manufacturers,” published in the September/October Precision Manufacturing Journal. He gave two keynote speeches: “The Current State of Manufacturing – Considering History,” Sept. 30 at the Larson Allen Manufacturing Roundup in Minneapolis, and “Why Government, Environmental Organizations, and Financial Institutions All Need More Scientists” Oct. 6 at the 3M Technology Symposium in St. Paul. On Oct. 21 he attended “Lessons from the Financial Crisis,” Victoria Bridges, Carnegie-Mellon University Symposium.