Essential Catholic Social Thought by Bernard V. Brady, Theology Department (Orbis Books, 2008).

This book provides a broad view of the rich tradition of Catholic reflection and action on social issues. It contains edited and abridged versions of the official teaching of the church as well as excerpts of writings from other significant contributors to Catholic social thought.

 

Power Struggles: Hydro Development and First Nations in Manitoba and Quebec co-edited by Steven M. Hoffman, Political Science Department, and Thibault Martin, University of Quebec, Ottawa (University of Manitoba Press, 2008).

This book examines the evolution of the new agreements signed or in progress between First Nations and hydro-corporations in Quebec and Manitoba. The book raises a crucial question: Is Canada, or at least Quebec and Manitoba, on the eve of a new relationship with the First Nations, or do the same colonial attitudes that have long characterized Canadian-Aboriginal relations, especially in terms of land and resource exploitation, still prevail?

 

An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy by Stephen J. Laumakis, PhilosophyDepartment (Cambridge University Press, 2008).

This book explains the origin and development of Buddhist ideas and concepts. It begins with a sketch of the Buddha and the Dharma, and highlights the origins of Buddhism in India. It then considers specific details of the Dharma, with special attention to Buddhist metaphysics and epistemology, and examines the development of Buddhism in China, Japan and Tibet, concluding with the ideas of the Dalai Lama and Thich Nhat Hanh.

 

Bringing Your Business to Life: The Four Virtues That Will Help You Build a Better Business – and a Better Life by Jeffrey Cornwall, Belmont University, and Michael Naughton, University of St. Thomas Catholic Studies, and Ethics and Law departments (Regal Publishing Group, 2008).

This book examines the virtues necessary for “being good” within the complexities of the life of the entrepreneur. The book is a blend of real entrepreneurial cases and practical insights of the four cardinal virtues – prudence, justice, courage and temperance.

 

The Environment and the Press: From Adventure Writing to Advocacy by Mark Neuzil, Communication and Journalism Department (Northwestern University Press, 2008).

From its origins in ancient texts through Izaak Walton, Henry Thoreau, Theodore Roosevelt and many others, this book examines the roots of today’s environmental journalism. Religious writing, nature writing, science writing and outdoor adventure writing are all considered as influences.

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