Day 3 of the Wellness Center’s annual Heart Hunt is under way – and just in time for Valentine’s Day. As a fun activity promoting healthy relationships, a laminated heart is hidden somewhere on the St. Thomas campus. Find the heart and win a valuable prize.

To win, find the laminated heart and return it to the Wellness Center to receive an autographed copy of What Happy Couples Do, written by Professor Carol Bruess, and other “Happy Couples” merchandise, a $25 gift card to Coffee Bené, and a $100 gift card to Axel’s Bonfire restaurant.

Clues will be given out daily – published in Bulletin Today, and posted on the Wellness Center website, Facebook and Twitter. Clue No. 3 and a healthy relationship tip (as well as earlier clues and relationship tips) are listed below:

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 Clue No. 3: Don’t sit down on the job.

Have a healthy relationships with yourself: A healthy relationship with another begins long before the first date or the first kiss. It begins with you. Accepting yourself. Loving yourself. Respecting yourself. You need to be able to take care of yourself and be kind to yourself before you can provide these things for someone else.

(From: College of Saint Benedict, Saint John’s University, Healthy Relationships.)

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Clue No. 2: A breathtaking view marks the spot.

Fighting fairly: A major stumbling block in any relationship is settling disagreements, which often are reduced to emotional shouting matches rather than caring problem-solving. Basic ground rules for effectively facing conflict in a relationship include:

  1. Maintain a spirit of good will – remember: you care about this person.
  2. Avoid attacking one another – discuss behavior, not personalities.
  3. Share your feelings – explore and discuss them.
  4. Focus on the present – past disappointments cannot be changed. Concentrate on the here and now.

(From: University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, Relationships)

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Clue No. 1: Find the heart at the center of campus.

Healthy relationship tip: Keep expectations realistic. No one can be everything we might want him or her to be. Sometimes people disappoint us. It’s not all-or-nothing, though. Healthy relationships mean accepting people as they are and not trying to change them!

(From: Kansas State University, Healthy Relationships.)