John Rheinberger

Around the World in 40 Years (and 196 Countries)

John Rheinberger ’70, ’90 M.B.A., has traveled to every country in the world and has a story to tell about each one.Rheinberger was strolling through the main square in Dakar, the capital of the western African nation of Senegal, when he asked a passerby to take his photo­graph. Having traveled alone to dozens of countries, this was something he had grown accustomed to, and usually he found people to be accommodating. But this time, the passerby refused, which put Rheinberger on alert: something was amiss.
Benji

Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops?

Gael Fashingbauer Cooper ’89 and Brian Bellmont ’90 chronicle the lost toys, tastes & trends of the ’70s and ’80s in their book Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops? Among their recollections is the Generation X dog hero, Benji.
1941 Aerial

My View at 1,000 Feet

Carl Baumgaertner '48 was the photo editor of the Kaydet, the St. Thomas Military Academy yearbook. He snapped the first aerial photo of campus on Dec. 6, 1941, from a J-3 Piper Cub piloted by George Kell, a fellow student who ran the Kaydet's darkroom. St. Thomas has grown and changed since that photo was taken, and those changes have been documented from the sky above campus.
Tom Madison

From Ma Bell to Boardrooms

A determined and common-sense work ethic always has characterized Tom Madison. "I’m not afraid of hard work," Madison said. "I just applied all of the principles that I learned on my paper routes ... "
Bruce Kramer

‘Death by a Thousand Paper Cuts’

Bruce Kramer always had been in excellent physical condition, and he was proud of it. In the summer of 2010, he noticed he had a "floppy" left foot and thought it might be a pinched nerve or sciatica. During his regular physical examination, he mentioned he was "walking a little funny" and the doctor suggested he should see a neurologist. He procrastinated until he took a couple of falls in October, when his left leg collapsed.
Randy Thysse

The Making of a Spy Catcher

When Randy Thysse '85 was growing up in the Minne­apolis working-class sub­urb of Brooklyn Center, it was suggested that he learn a trade, like neighbors who were plumb­ers or glaziers, or maybe he could follow in his dad’s footsteps and learn carpet laying.The trade he settled into, and which he never once considered while growing up, is sometimes called spycraft.
Matthew Schmidtbauer

An Apiarist’s Sweet Summer

St. Thomas junior Matthew Schmidtbauer is an electrical engineering student with aspirations of someday working for a high-performance electric car manufacturing company. The subjects of his pastime, however, are not motors or revolutions per minute, but tens of thousands of honeybees that he cares for each summer.
Jerry Hammer

Fair Game

Jerry Hammer’s earliest recollection of the fair is fleeing from it when he was three years old. “We were watching a [midway attraction] … where a man sits in a cage, and a light bulb above his head turns off. When it turns back on, there [was] a guy in a gorilla suit standing in the cage where the man used to be. I remember looking out the window to see if the gorilla was chasing us home. … My 6-year-old brother [Robert ’74] just laughed.”
12-179 magazine uganda

An Angel in Africa

Father Dennis Dease's magnanimous involvement in Uganda reflects his commitment to the mission of the university
Fr. Dease in Uganda

Up Front: A Life of Service

My decision to retire next year didn’t exactly come as a surprise to many colleagues and friends who know where we are in pursuing significant milestones.
Kampala

Reason for Hope

KAMPALA, UGANDA - The miracle workers are busy here these days.In a former retail storefront on a rut-filled dirt road in Ndejje, a poverty-stricken area southeast of Kampala, the first Hope Medical Clinic opened in November 2007. The sign outside says "Eddwaliro," Ugandan for "health care," in bold red letters, and 40 to 50 people show up every month or treatment of malaria, typhoid fever and the flu.
Out of Africa

Out of Africa

Degrees in hand, Ugandan students seek to make an impact in our world
Most Friday and Saturday nights are dedicated to going out with friends – usually starting no earlier than midnight. One difference between clubs in Minnesota and Kampala, according to Olivia? “For one, clubs here close at 2 a.m., not 4 a.m.”

Home and Away

Sisters Felista and Olivia Mpanga have found comfort and friendship in Minnesota
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Student Centered

The newly opened Anderson Student Center will offer Tommies a plethora of foods, services, and social activites
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This Dorm’s Life

Ireland Hall and a century of Lavin Burgers, ghosts and snowball fights
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When Life Gives You Art

A young alumna who had career goals of becoming a doctor made an about-face when given a unique opportunity.