Bruce Kramer

Kramer Announces Medical Leave as Dean of the College of Education, Leadership and Counseling

Dr. Bruce Kramer announced today that he is taking a leave of absence, effective immediately, as dean of the College of Education, Leadership and Counseling in order to deal with his amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Kramer told a luncheon meeting of CELC faculty, staff and advisory board members that he believes he no longer can work because of the progression of his ALS, which was diagnosed in December 2010.
Civil Discourse

The Scroll: Civil Discourse Needed More Than Ever

Dave Nimmer is tired of what he calls the “mean season” of politics, where candidates for public office run ads that, in his words, “stretch the truth” at the least and “trample it” at the worst. He remains hopeful, he writes today in The Scroll, that civility might yet prevail.
Benji

Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops?

Gael Fashingbauer Cooper ’89 and Brian Bellmont ’90 chronicle the lost toys, tastes & trends of the ’70s and ’80s in their book Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops? Among their recollections is the Generation X dog hero, Benji.
John Schneider

Hail Marys, Hard Work Fuel Alum’s NFL Rise (and the Seattle Seahawks)

Gene McGivern, the university's sports information director, wrote the heart of this story in a 2010 blog. It's about John Schneider, an alum who grew up near Green Bay and lived and died with the Packers, eventually interning and later working for the team; he joined the Seattle Seahawks as their general manager in 2010. McGivern is working in his 18th season at St. Thomas and 24th in the MIAC. He blogs periodically on various topics regarding the Tommies, the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and Division III sports.
1941 Aerial

My View at 1,000 Feet

Carl Baumgaertner '48 was the photo editor of the Kaydet, the St. Thomas Military Academy yearbook. He snapped the first aerial photo of campus on Dec. 6, 1941, from a J-3 Piper Cub piloted by George Kell, a fellow student who ran the Kaydet's darkroom. St. Thomas has grown and changed since that photo was taken, and those changes have been documented from the sky above campus.
Campus Aerials

The Scroll: That’s My School

Martha McCarthy graduated in 2011, but she still feels linked to the St. Thomas community every day and what is happening on campus because of social media and the Web. Sharing that “common bond” is important and exciting, she writes today in The Scroll.
Tom Madison

From Ma Bell to Boardrooms

A determined and common-sense work ethic always has characterized Tom Madison. "I’m not afraid of hard work," Madison said. "I just applied all of the principles that I learned on my paper routes ... "
Bruce Kramer

‘Death by a Thousand Paper Cuts’

Bruce Kramer always had been in excellent physical condition, and he was proud of it. In the summer of 2010, he noticed he had a "floppy" left foot and thought it might be a pinched nerve or sciatica. During his regular physical examination, he mentioned he was "walking a little funny" and the doctor suggested he should see a neurologist. He procrastinated until he took a couple of falls in October, when his left leg collapsed.
12-021 CAS faculty desk

The Scroll: The Perils of Summer Cleaning

Is your office a mess? Susan Alexander long realized hers was just that, and then one day over the summer she wandered into Kris Bunton’s sparkling office and became inspired. Susan returned to her Aquinas Hall office and began what she called a “renovation.” Read about it today in The Scroll.
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Music Department Names Parker Quartet as its First Artists-in-Residence

The Parker Quartet's residency activities will include a full-length public concert, musicianship seminars and lecture demonstrations for music students, All Hearts Listen Lectures (a series of pre-concert discussions), chamber music coaching, and master classes for string students and composition students.
Randy Thysse

The Making of a Spy Catcher

When Randy Thysse '85 was growing up in the Minne­apolis working-class sub­urb of Brooklyn Center, it was suggested that he learn a trade, like neighbors who were plumb­ers or glaziers, or maybe he could follow in his dad’s footsteps and learn carpet laying.The trade he settled into, and which he never once considered while growing up, is sometimes called spycraft.
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The Scroll: Got Gas?

Carol Bruess, bargain hunter extraordinaire, has discovered a deal almost too good to be true: A 10 percent discount on gasoline at the Sinclair station on Grand Avenue, thanks to the St. Thomas eXpress Card, and they’ll even wash your windows. She exudes about the deal – and the full service – today in The Scroll.
Dr. Matthew Batt (left) and Dr. Leslie Adrienne Miller will read from their recently published books this Friday. Photos by Bill Hickey (Batt) and Mike Ekern '02 (Miller).

A Conversation With Dr. Matthew Batt and Dr. Leslie Miller

Batt's first published work, Sugarhouse, is his harrowing and often hilarious story of renovating a Salt Lake City crack house. Miller's Y, her sixth collection of poetry, "describes motherhood with a broad-ranging intelligence, a fierce humor, and an elegant, emotive poetic line," according to her publisher, Graywolf Press. Batt and Miller are faculty members in the English Department and will read from their works on Friday, Sept. 21.