(left to right_ Virgil Wiebe, George Baboila and Dr. Patricia Stankovitch. Photo by Tom Whisenand.

Professional Notes for Oct. 3, 2012

This week's notes feature faculty George Baboila, Dr. Mike Klein, Dr. Patricia Stankovitch, Dr. Martin Warren, Virgil Wiebe, Dr. Meg Wilkes Karraker and Jennifer Wright; staff Mark Jensen; and doctoral students Peter Keenan and Kristen Stevens.
Benji

Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops?

Gael Fashingbauer Cooper ’89 and Brian Bellmont ’90 chronicle the lost toys, tastes & trends of the ’70s and ’80s in their book Whatever Happened to Pudding Pops? Among their recollections is the Generation X dog hero, Benji.
The rise of the Seattle Seahawks has coincided with 2010 arrival of St. Thomas alum John Schneider, center, as the team's general manager and executive vice president. (Seattle Seahawk's photo.)

Hail Marys, Hard Work Fuel Alum’s NFL Rise (and the Seattle Seahawks)

Gene McGivern, the university's sports information director, wrote the heart of this story in a 2010 blog. It's about John Schneider, an alum who grew up near Green Bay and lived and died with the Packers, eventually interning and later working for the team; he joined the Seattle Seahawks as their general manager in 2010. McGivern is working in his 18th season at St. Thomas and 24th in the MIAC. He blogs periodically on various topics regarding the Tommies, the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and Division III sports.
1941 Aerial

My View at 1,000 Feet

Carl Baumgaertner '48 was the photo editor of the Kaydet, the St. Thomas Military Academy yearbook. He snapped the first aerial photo of campus on Dec. 6, 1941, from a J-3 Piper Cub piloted by George Kell, a fellow student who ran the Kaydet's darkroom. St. Thomas has grown and changed since that photo was taken, and those changes have been documented from the sky above campus.
Tom Madison

From Ma Bell to Boardrooms

A determined and common-sense work ethic always has characterized Tom Madison. "I’m not afraid of hard work," Madison said. "I just applied all of the principles that I learned on my paper routes ... "
Bruce Kramer

‘Death by a Thousand Paper Cuts’

Bruce Kramer always had been in excellent physical condition, and he was proud of it. In the summer of 2010, he noticed he had a "floppy" left foot and thought it might be a pinched nerve or sciatica. During his regular physical examination, he mentioned he was "walking a little funny" and the doctor suggested he should see a neurologist. He procrastinated until he took a couple of falls in October, when his left leg collapsed.
Randy Thysse

The Making of a Spy Catcher

When Randy Thysse '85 was growing up in the Minne­apolis working-class sub­urb of Brooklyn Center, it was suggested that he learn a trade, like neighbors who were plumb­ers or glaziers, or maybe he could follow in his dad’s footsteps and learn carpet laying.The trade he settled into, and which he never once considered while growing up, is sometimes called spycraft.
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Professional Notes for Sept. 19, 2012

This week's notes feature staff member Samba Dieng; faculty Dr. Leah Domine, Dr. Len Jennings, Dr. Vanessa Cornett-Murtada, Dr. Kevin Thiessen, Dr. Daniel Tight, Dr. Lisa Waldner, Dr. Meg Wilkes Karraker and Dr. Kyle Zimmer; doctoral students Ashley Gulden and Michael Oien; and alumna Jen Blank.
Dr. Matthew Batt (left) and Dr. Leslie Adrienne Miller will read from their recently published books this Friday. Photos by Bill Hickey (Batt) and Mike Ekern '02 (Miller).

A Conversation With Dr. Matthew Batt and Dr. Leslie Miller

Batt's first published work, Sugarhouse, is his harrowing and often hilarious story of renovating a Salt Lake City crack house. Miller's Y, her sixth collection of poetry, "describes motherhood with a broad-ranging intelligence, a fierce humor, and an elegant, emotive poetic line," according to her publisher, Graywolf Press. Batt and Miller are faculty members in the English Department and will read from their works on Friday, Sept. 21.