Erika Kidd

Great Thinkers of History Are Lifelong Companions for Dr. Erika Kidd

Dr. Erika Kidd is the professor of record this spring in “The Pursuit of Happiness,” a first-year course, and “The Catholic Vision,” a third-year course, but students may well hear from a few others – great thinkers such as St. Augustine, Boethius, Flannery O’Connor, Simone Weil, Aristotle and Evelyn Waugh, for example, and for good measure the Scriptures.
Miami bound hitchhikers

Tommie Traditions: The Laugh Club

The club promoted pranks, laughter and, oddly enough, cross-country hitchhiking races as club members good-timed their way through college in the years following WW II. They also had a serious, studious side that would serve them well later in the professional world.
Mike_Johnson_744x408

Runner’s Odyssey Carries Two Marathoners to the Boston Finish Line – an Epic Trilogy

In 2012, Mike Johnson '90 qualified for "Boston" while running 12 marathons in 12 months. In 2013 he started Boston but did not finish when the race was stopped after two pressure cooker backpack bombs detonated near the finish line. This year, on Easter Monday, he completed his "marathon" trilogy and with three others helped carry a faltering runner to the Boston finish line. Their actions went viral on Twitter and can be viewed on YouTube.
Alex Haley

Depth of Field Icons: Alex Haley

Family roots run deep when you dig into your genealogy, which Alex Haley did to write "Roots: The Saga of an American Family" (1976). Haley spoke on campus on Oct. 28, 1986.
After attending the College of St. Thomas for three years, Harry Rasmussen was in the U.S. Army and stationed in San Diego, Calif., on Dec. 7, 1941, the day Pearl Harbor was attacked. That evening he wrote a letter to his father. He returned to St. Thomas after WW II. That historic letter and his four yearbooks were recently delivered to St. Thomas.  (Inset: Rasmussen and his letter.)

‘Welcome Home, 1st Sgt. Harry Rasmussen!’

Harry Rasmussen, a native of Sleepy Eye, Minn., attended the College of St. Thomas from fall 1938 until spring 1941. He went into the Army, apparently drafted, and was stationed in San Diego, Calif. On Dec. 7, 1941, following the attack on Pearl Harbor, he wrote a letter to his father. That historic letter and his four yearbooks have found their way home to St. Thomas. He served in the Army for four and a half years and then returned to campus.