career-sites-wsj

This post is by Maggie Tomas, a Career Specialist in UST’s Graduate Business Career Services office.

You’ve all heard the statistic that 60-90% of jobs are not found on the Internet and instead come from your network of family, friends and colleagues. How, then, can the Internet be used as a career search tool? It’s best used to research and expand your knowledge on what is happening in your industry now. Here in Graduate Business Career Services, we are constantly perusing the net to see what information is out there for our MBA students and alumni, and how this information can be used to help each land the job of their dreams. We have compiled a list of Five Great Sites You Should Be Reading as an MBA Looking for a Job.

The Career Journal: This feature of the Wall Street Journal offers an excellent array of articles, relevant research, and information on trends in a variety of industries.  Every business minded individual should check this website out once a week.

Career Rocketeer: This career search and personal branding blog focuses on how to utilize social media to leverage your career.  Check out partner site MBA Highway for information specific to MBA’s.

Quintessential Careers: An excellent general job search information site.  Includes sample resumes, cover letters, and thank you’s, as well as recommended career books, career blogs, and a job search engine.  Quint Careers also devotes an entire section to resources for career changers.

Career Alltop: A one stop shop for any career topic you are researching with articles and blogs ranging from Why Deadlines are Good to Are There Jobs for Green MBA’s? This aggregator of many career sites also has a jobs section for national job listings.

LinkedIn: If you aren’t using it you should be!  LinkedIn can be a powerful way to connect with other business people in a meaningful way. Not only is LinkedIn a tool to professionally utilize social networking, it also contains a job board with postings that match your area of experience. Make sure that when you do apply for a job through LinkedIn that your profile represents your skills applicable to that job.  Join groups in your area of expertise and be active and engage.

So, yes, the statistic above is largely true.  You are more likely not to land your dream job by simply clicking through job postings on the internet.  However, use the internet wisely and you can research and network your way to finding important professional development information. What career sites do you read? Let us know in the comments.