• Professional Notes

    Dr. Michael Andregg, Justice and Peace Studies Department, College of Arts and Sciences, presented a paper, “Building Bridges Between Enemies,” Oct. 2, at the annual meeting of the Peace and Justice Studies Association in Winnipeg, Manitoba. Andregg also participated in a panel that discussed, in his words, “the recent increase in FBI harassment of peace activists in America, which will lead to some education in that sector to help law enforcement distinguish between secretive, armed and very dangerous terrorists as opposed to public, very vocal, unarmed and nonviolent peace activists and political protesters. For reasons explained elsewhere, this has been a difficult distinction for the FBI to make for generations, including the infamous COINTELPRO program during the Vietnam War and a five-year psychological operations campaign against the civil rights activities of Rev. Martin Luther King and his associates.”

    Dr. Bernard Armada, Communication and Journalism Department, College of Arts and Sciences, is the author of a chapter, titled “Memory’s Execution: (Dis)Placing the Dissident Body,” in the book Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials, edited by Greg Dickenson, Carole Blair and Brian L. Ott, University of Alabama Press, 2010.

    Father James Burns, Graduate School of Professional Psychology, College of Applied Professional Studies, presented a series of talks to the Roman Catholic Diocese of Peoria, Illinois’ Catholic schools’ division on “Spirituality in the Present Moment: Reducing Stress and Anxiety in Our Ministry” Sept. 23 and 24. Burns also presented a conference in September to the Association of Coordinators and Religious Educators for Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis titled “Thriving in the Face of Stress: Religious Educators Role in Promoting Hope and Renewal in the Church.”

    Dr. Michael Cogan, Institutional Research and Analysis, is the author of an article, “Exploring Academic Outcomes of Homeschooled Students,” published in the Journal of College Admission this past summer. 

    Karen Harthorn, Purchasing and Payables, is moderating a Mind X-Change session at the 2010 regional meeting for the National Association for Educational Procurement, Sept. 26-29 in Omaha, Neb. Harthorn is currently serving as president for the MN/DAK (Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota) region of the NAEP. 

    Doug Hennes, University Relations, has been appointed to a three-year term on the St. Paul Area Chamber of Commerce board, effective in January. He succeeds Dr. Mark Dienhart, executive vice president and chief operating officer, on the board.

    Sister Katarina Schuth, OSF, School of Divinity, presented a report to the Conference of Major Superiors of Men Leadership Committee on the status of seminary education in theological schools for men religious on Aug. 9. The report was given in preparation for a national conference on “The Gift of Religious Priesthood, to be held Oct. 17-18, in Denver. She also is the author of a chapter, “The Importance of Performance Evaluation of Seminarians and Priests for Effective Parish Ministry,” published in Best Practices in Catholic Church Ministry Performance Management (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2010)The book, edited by Charles Zech, was based on a conference of the same name held at The Catholic University of America.

    Dr. Bob Werner led a discussion at Macalester College about Dambisa Moyo’s views on aid to Africa. He showed interviews with Moyo, gave a summary of her book Dead Aid: Why Aid is Not Working and How There is a Better Way for Africa (Farrar, Straus, and Giroux, 2009) and led a lively debate on how aid is and is not working in Africa. The audience was Macalester’s Africa Club.

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