The University of St. Thomas

Music

Geiger, Patrick

Geiger, Patrick

A Comparison of Two Choral Reporting Guides in an Assessment Design
Patrick Charles Geiger
Abstract

The intent of this thesis was to compare two performance assessment models to discover whether reporting models affect students’ vocal proficiency growth. Six sub-questions were examined: (1) Following a formative test, is there a difference in the distribution of scores between the 3-tiered and 4-tiered assessment models? (2) Following the students’ receipt of formative test scores, what is the distribution of students requesting teacher assistance to improve scores on the summative test of: (a) students in the 3-tiered model group? (b) students in the 4-tiered model group? (3) Following the students’ receipt of formative test scores, what are the responses to a forced-response survey regarding the effectiveness of the assessment model of: (a) students in the 3-tiered model group? (b) students in the 4-tiered model group? (4) Following the summative test, is there a difference in the distribution of scores between the 3-tiered and 4-tiered assessment models? (5) Following the summative test, are there differences in growth of proficiency in students’ scores from formative to summative between the 3-tiered model and the 4-tiered model? (6) Following student receipt of summative test scores, what are the responses to a forced-response survey regarding the effectiveness of the assessment model of: (a) students in the 3-tiered model group? (b) students in the 4-tiered model group?

The study involved fourteen subjects from a high school women’s choir. The subjects were divided into a three-tiered reporting model group and a four-tiered reporting model group. During a curricular period of instruction, subjects were given a formal formative assessment that was scored by a panel of vocal music instructors. After the formative assessment and the subjects had seen their scores, they were given a survey to complete. At the completion of the curricular period, the students were given a formal summative assessment, which was also scored by the same panel of instructors. After the student had received the scores from their reporting guides, students were given a final survey. The data were collected, reported, and compared.

Findings of the research project revealed that the two reporting models demonstrated similar success in the formative assessment and in initiating corrective learning actions. Significantly, however, the subjects in the three-tiered reporting model demonstrated a considerable advantage in demonstrated multi-criterion vocal proficiency growth.

Thesis Supervisor
Dr. Carroll Gonzo