The University of St. Thomas

Music

Kulish, Carma

Kulish, Carma

A Correlational Study Between the Stanford Achievement Test and the Intermediate Measures of Music Audiation
Carma Cleone Kulish
Abstract

The purpose of this research study was to see if there would be a correlation between musical aptitude and reading achievement in one class of fifth grade students (n=16) enrolled in a rural public school. The two tests used were the Stanford Achievement Test (STAT) and the Intermediate Measures of Music Audiation (IMMA).

The review of literature included in this paper covered the following elements of this study: music literacy, musical aptitude, and reading literacy. The element of music literacy covered auditory perception, visual perception, and the integrated auditory and visual perception. The element of reading literacy covered the theories of reading instruction, listening comprehension and reading comprehension. Also included in the review of literature was a discussion of existing studies where reading literacy and music literacy were compared.

The following comparisons were made between the two tests: STAT Reading Comprehension and IMMA Composite, STAT Listening Composite and IMMA Tonal, STAT Listening Composite and IMMA Rhythm, STAT Listening Composite and IMMA Composite, STAT Listening Comprehension and IMMA Tonal, STAT Listening Comprehension and IMMA Rhythm, STAT Listening Comprehension and IMMA Composite, and STAT Total Reading and IMMA Composite. Pearson Product-Moment Correlation Coefficients were used in the comparisons. Additionally, the r values were examined to determine whether or not statistical significance was achieved at the alpha level of p > .05. The eight correlations showed no relationship or a low negative relationship. There was no significance between any of the variables.

Discussion of test factors such as achievement test, aptitude test, and small sample size is included. Also included in the final chapter is a summary of the author’s thoughts related to using the information obtained from these tests in meaningful classroom applications.

Capstone Advisor
Hilree J. Hamilton