Terrence J. Murphy Institute

for Catholic Thought, Law and Public Policy

The Dangers of Anti-Sharia Laws: Muslim and Catholic Perspectives

The Murphy Institute's 2012-2013 Hot Topics: Cool Talk series of discussions, which fearlessly explores Catholic positions and other perspectives on provocative issues of law and politics, will focus this year on the many challenges to religious freedom around the world.

Date/Time

Tuesday, October 23, 2012
7:30 PM - 8:30 PM

Location

O'Shaughnessy Educational Center Auditorium


Cost

Free and open to the public

CLE

Approved for an "elimination of bias" continuing- legal- education credit


Watch the Video

Our Speakers:

Abdulwahid Qalinle, an adjunct law professor at the University of Minnesota Law School and director of its Islamic Law and Human Rights Program, and Rob Vischer, law professor and associate dean of academic affairs at the University of St. Thomas School of Law examine why anti-Sharia legislation threatens the religious liberty of all.

Qalinle holds a master's degree in Islamic, or Shariah, law, and law degrees from both the International Islamic University in Pakistan and the University of Minnesota Law School, where he directs the Islamic Law and Human Rights Program. 

Vischer graduated from Harvard Law School, where he was an editor of the Harvard Law Review.  He is the author of two books and many journal articles that explore the intersection of law, religion and public policy.

The title for the Oct. 23 forum comes from Vischer’s article, “The Dangers of Anti-Sharia Laws,” published in First Things, the journal of The Institute on Religion and Public Life.” In the article, Vischer explains that Shariah means “the way to the watering place.” It refers to the correct way of practicing religion and rules that govern the lives of Muslims, including conduct between spouses, behavior at funerals and even etiquette. 

Information about the Hot Topics: Cool Talk series is available at http://www.stthomas.edu/murphyinstitute/upcomingevents/.

The Minnesota Board of Legal Education has approved this Oct. 23 program for one "elimination of bias" continuing-legal-education credit.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Prof. Qalinle and Prof Vischer

Prof. Qalinle and Prof. Vischer