Shea, Hank

Henry Shea

Senior Distinguished Fellow, School of Law; Fellow, The Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions

Shea,-Hank
(651) 962-4867
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-4867

1000 LaSalle Ave
Minneapolis, MN 55403

Office Location: MSL 461

J.D., Harvard Law School 

B.S. Georgetown University

Former Assistant U.S. Attorney Henry (Hank) Shea joined the Law School in the fall 2006 semester as a Distinguished Senior Fellow with an additional appointment as a Fellow in the Thomas Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions. Shea also serves as a University Associate at the James E. Rogers College of Law at the University of Arizona in Tucson. He donates his time in these roles.

Shea teaches four courses, Crime & Punishment, White Collar Crime, Ethical Leadership in Litigation, and Ethical Leadership in Social Justice. He also assists the Law School to realize the Holloran Center's mission to provide leading-edge interdisciplinary research, curriculum development, and programs that focus on forming students and practicing professionals into accomplished servant leaders in their communities. As part of that effort, Shea founded and is engaging in a unique collaboration with white-collar offenders, some of whom he prosecuted, to make joint ethics presentations and publish articles book about why they committed their crimes, and the consequences and lessons learned from their misconduct.

Shea was one of the country's most effective white-collar crime prosecutors. He served as an Assistant U.S. Attorney (AUSA) for the District of Minnesota for almost 20 years. Between 1994 and 1998, Shea served as the Chief of his Office's Economic Crime Section. From crimes that Shea prosecuted, the U.S. Attorney's Office collected more than $50 million in restitution, fines, and forfeitures.

As an AUSA, Shea received numerous national awards, including a U.S. Department of Justice Commendation (Environmental Division) in 2003, a U.S. Department of Justice Director's Award in 2002 and 2000, and a U.S. Chief Postal Inspector's Special Award in 2000. In June 2007, Shea received the Minnesota State Bar Association Professional Excellence Award for outstanding efforts to advance the legal profession and the administration of justice.

Shea began his legal career through service in the armed forces. After graduating summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in Foreign Service from Georgetown University in 1978, and cum laude with a Juris Doctorate from Harvard Law School in 1981, Shea served for four years, active duty, with the United States Army. He worked as an Assistant to the General Counsel in the U.S. Department of the Army at the Pentagon from 1981-1985. He was awarded the Army's Meritorious Service Medal in 1985. After leaving active duty, Shea continued to serve as an Army Reserve Officer in the Judge Advocate General Corps from 1985-1992.

Prior to rejoining the Justice Department in 1994, Shea was a shareholder with Leonard, Street and Deinard in Minneapolis for two years. Shea also served as Special Assistant U.S. Attorney in Washington D.C. in 1985.

Shea also has been a frequent speaker on business and legal ethics and white-collar crime. He has given more than 100 presentations locally and nationally in the last three years.

In addition to his professional achievements, Shea is a former member of the Board of Directors of Youth Frontiers, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and has served as the chair of the Board of Directors of Benilde-St. Margaret's School in St. Louis Park, Minnesota from 2004-2005, as part of four years of Board service. Previously, he served for eleven years, from 1987 to 1998, on the Board of the St. Louis Park Emergency Program, a non-profit food shelf. For three of those years, Shea served as Board chair.

Selected Cases Prosecuted as Assistant U.S. Attorney

  • United States v. Joseph Micatrotto, Greg Gadel and John Motschenbacher, Criminal Nos. 06-167 and 06-168 (June 2006) (Former CEO, CFO, and CIO of BUCA, Inc. pled guilty to various fraud offenses involving embezzlement and misappropriation of corporate funds and false certified financial statements sent to SEC, sentenced to 13 months imprisonment, 12 months of imprisonment, and 12 months of home detention, respectively, and collectively paid more than $1 million in criminal and civil financial sanctions; Motschenbacher subsequently has made numerous educational presentations about the causes of his offenses and their consequences)
  • United States v. David Slominski, Criminal No. 05-414 (Former Wells Fargo bank branch manager pled guilty to bank fraud and embezzlement, sentenced to 48 months imprisonment and $800,000 in restitution)
  • United States v. Steven Davis, Criminal No. 05-40 (Former CFO of a W.R. Berkeley Corporation subsidiary pled guilty to mail fraud, sentenced to 48 months imprisonment and $1.9 million in restitution)
  • United States v. Molly Cohoon-Peine, Criminal No. 04-468 (Former bank officer pled guilty to bank fraud and embezzlement, sentenced to 80 months imprisonment and $1.6 million in restitution)
  • United States v. Patrick Forciea, Criminal No. 04-314 (Owner of minor league hockey teams pled guilty to six fraud offenses involving $6.75 million in fraudulent loans and embezzled funds, sentenced to 96 months imprisonment and $5 million in restitution)
  • United States v. Katun Corporation, et al., Criminal No. 04-025 (Corporation pled guilty to 12 fraud offenses and paid $6 million in restitution and $5 million fine, implemented extensive corporate compliance program; former board member, three former executives and general counsel pled or found guilty of various fraud offenses, paid $1.95 million in restitution and $900,000 in fines)
  • United States v. T. Michael Clarke, Criminal Nos. 03-31 and 04-18 (Former Katun CEO and Chairman pled guilty to six tax and fraud offenses, sentenced to 24 months imprisonment, paid $4 million in restitution, $2.25 million in fines, and $1 million fraud penalty)
  • United States v. Robin Parsons and Donald Clark, Jr., Criminal No. 03-424 (Defendants pled guilty to mail fraud, money laundering, and tax offenses arising from corporate kickback scheme, both sentenced to 30 months imprisonment and $2 million in restitution)
  • United States v. Stephen Rondestvedt, Criminal No. 03-323 (Former attorney pled guilty to mail fraud, sentenced to 46 months imprisonment and $780,000 in restitution; defendant subsequently has made more than a dozen appearances at Minnesota law schools and other locations to speak about the consequences of his misconduct)
  • United States v. Patricia and Steven Knish, Criminal No. 03-20 (Owners of highway construction company pled guilty to tax evasion offenses involving more than $1.9 million of unreported income, sentenced to 30 and 24 months imprisonment, respectively, forced to sell their residence and paid $1 million towards their tax liabilities)
  • United States v. Steven Samborski, Criminal No. 03-14 (Former attorney pled guilty to mail and wire fraud, sentenced to 60 months imprisonment and $230,000 in restitution)
  • United States v. Ashland Inc., Criminal No. 02-152 (co-counsel) (Corporation pled guilty to two environmental charges, paid $8 million in fines and restitution, implemented more than $10 million in design and safety improvements, sponsored national environmental program, and paid for newspaper ads apologizing for its conduct)
  • United States v. George Kline, Robert Hibbs, Michael Mulligan, Marvin Goldstein, et al., Criminal Nos. 01-69, 03-32, 03-100 (Eight defendants pled guilty to various securities and other fraud offenses in extensive insider trading conspiracy, Kline and Hibbs sentenced to 54 months and 48 months imprisonment, defendants collectively paid more than $11 million in forfeiture, fines, and restitution; Kline, a well-known financier and board member of dozens of 40 companies, subsequently made various educational presentations regarding his offenses)
  • United States v. David Logan, Michael Morgan, et al., Criminal Nos. 2-62, 02-77 (Eight defendants pled guilty to bank fraud and public corruption-related charges, Logan and Morgan sentenced to 70 months and 48 months imprisonment, respectively,  defendants collectively paid more than $2 million in forfeiture, fines, and restitution; Logan subsequently has made various educational presentations regarding lessons learned)
  • United States v. Wayne Shevi, (2002) (Owner of printing business pled guilty to mail and tax fraud and structuring offenses, sentenced to 39 months imprisonment and $160,000 in restitution, and forfeiture of a $200,00 boat)
  • United States v. Robert Johnson, (2002) and related cases (Seven defendants pled guilty to various pension fraud offenses, Johnson sentenced to 30 months imprisonment, more than $200,000 in restitution and fines ordered; four defendants paid for newspaper ads warning business owners about duties under ERISA statutes)
  • United States v. John Hetherington, Daniel Bubalo, et al., (2000) (Four defendants found guilty of or pled guilty to securities fraud or related offenses, Hetherington sentenced to 80 months imprisonment, more than $5 million in restitution awarded, corporate attorney paid $300,000 fine)
  • United States v. Emil Draskovich, Gerald Drong, Gary Cerkvenik, et al., (2000) (Four defendants pled guilty to various fraud or tax related offenses in kickback and misappropriation case involving former plant manager of iron ore mine, Draskovich sentenced to 24 months imprisonment and $200,000 in restitution)
  • United States v. Glenn Smith, (1999) (Former attorney/Mayor of Edina pled guilty to mail fraud, sentenced to 41 months imprisonment and $530,000 in restitution for defrauding vulnerable clients)
  • United States v. Julie Kakach, (1999) and related cases (Eight defendants pled guilty to workers’ compensation fraud offenses, paid more than $110,000 in restitution and penalties, and forfeited all future benefits resulting in a cost savings of more than $4 million to federal agencies)
  • United States v. Norman Gurstel, (1999) (Former attorney pled guilty to mail fraud for embezzling $370,000 from clients to spend on clothes, sentenced to 27 months imprisonment and surrendered 58 suits, 39 sport jackets, and 123 pairs of dress shoes for sale to pay restitution)
  • United States v. John Anderson, Frederick Schumacher, and Samuel Podany, (1998-1999) (Three defendants found guilty of or pled guilty to securities fraud offenses, sentenced to 46 months, 41 months, and 30 months imprisonment, respectively,  and $500,000 in restitution)
  • United States v. David Moskal, (1998) (Former attorney and name partner pled guilty to mail fraud and sentenced to 60 months imprisonment for defrauding vulnerable clients, paid more than $2 million in restitution)
  • United States v. Marvin Pullman, Milton Bigalk, et al., (1997-1998) (Six defendants found guilty of or pled guilty to various fraud offenses related to Montana Freemen schemes, Pullman and Bigalk sentenced to 70 months and 57 months imprisonment, respectively)
  • United States v. Harold Greenwood, et al., (1992) (co-counsel) (Five defendants found guilty of or plead guilty to savings and loan fraud related offenses arising from failure of Midwest Federal (MWF) following a six-month trial, Greenwood, the former Chairman and President also found guilty of insider trading and RICO offenses and sentenced to 42 months imprisonment, defendants collectively ordered to forfeit more than $4 million)
  • United States v. C. Bruce Solomonson, (1989) (Former insurance broker and MWF Director found guilty of mail and bank fraud, sentenced to 46 months imprisonment and $600,000 in restitution)

Courses Taught

Number Title Credits
824 Crime and Punishment 2
858 White Collar Crime& Compliance 2
950 Supervised Resrch & Writing .5

Areas of Academic Expertise:

Business and Legal Ethics
White-Collar Crimes

From the article "Grand Ideas: Faculty members describe the best ideas from their scholarship" St. Thomas Lawyer Magazine Fall 2011

My most important research has been to work with more than two dozen white-collar offenders, many of whom I prosecuted as an assistant U.S. attorney, to explore the origins of and reasons for their misconduct, and the lessons to be learned from the crimes they committed and their consequences. We have made more than 150 joint ethics presentations at law and business schools, colleges and conferences throughout the country. The focus of our scholarship has been to compile and analyze these presentations in videos and articles. The work continues.

Upcoming: Promoting ethical behavior and addressing criminal justice reforms through the Holloran Center for Ethical Leadership in the Professions, and my Crime and Punishment and other courses.

Contributions and mentions in the media

Video Presentations and interviews with Professor Shea

Star Tribune - "Five years later: Tom Petters' Ponzi scheme"

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Duke, Harvard Provide No Exemption From Ethics, Crime Probes

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Minneapolis Star Tribune - "An Open Letter to Tom Petters as a Man Entering Prison"

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Minneapolis Star Tribune - "A 'conversation' with Tom Petters"

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