Fall 2012 Registration

Registration for Fall Semester 2012 will begin on Wednesday, April 11, at 8:00 a.m. for current 2L students and Thursday, April 12, at 8:00 a.m. for current 1L students.

Important Links:

Register for Courses
Fall 2012 Course Schedule and Descriptions (View in Classfinder, use drop down menu to pick the correct term.)  
Spring 2013 Courses (Tentative)  


 

Graduation Requirements

Required Credits and Courses for Graduation:

  • Rising 2L students (current 1Ls): Remember to take Professional Responsibility and Lawyering Skills III this year.
  • Rising 3L students (current 2Ls): Don’t forget to make sure that you have taken all required courses and verify that you are satisfying all graduation requirements.
  • NOTE:  The Mentor Externship curriculum is changing, and while the faculty has approved the foundational changes, we continue to work with students on fine-tuning a number of details.  We will provide more information in the coming weeks.  For 2012-13, not only will you continue to work with your assigned mentor in an external placement, you will also meet individually with a faculty mentor assigned to your Mentor Externship Program Seminar section, attend several small and large group sessions, and complete a few written assignments.  You must register for one of the 2L sections (LAW 930) or 3L sections (LAW 933).  The seminar counts as 1 credit for the year, calculated as 0 credit in the fall and 1 credit in the spring

Course Load and Residency Requirements:

  • See Policy III-A-2 for the maximum and minimum number if credits for which you may register, and for the residency requirements for graduation. 
  • REMEMBER:  The required Mentor Externship course (1 credit per year) will count 1 credit toward your course load in the spring semester

Fall 2012 Registration Concerns:

New Courses in Fall 2012:

LAWS 793/1 Topics: Accounting for Lawyers (Adjunct Prof. Liz Brama, 1 credit)

This course will introduce accounting, finance, and audit concepts and skills to lawyers who may wish to work with financial issues in either transactional or business litigation settings.  The course will help students understand and apply the basic language and theories of financial accounting, as well as identify what business accountants and auditors do.  New lawyers who have taken this class will be able to discuss fundamental accounting concepts that may arise in the course of individual legal matters or are of basic importance to their clients.  The class will meet for two hours each week for the first seven weeks of the semester.

LAWS 793/2 Topics: Advanced Corporations (Prof. Tom Joyce, 2 credits)

Advanced Corporations will consider four or five relatively broad corporate law subjects in some depth.  The topics may include:  shareholder voting, secondary markets in private company securities, foreign issuers, professional liability, and private placement of investment company securities.  The course requires a paper which, with the instructor’s permission, can satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Prerequisite: Business Associations

LAWS 793/3 Topics: Energy Law Practicum (Adjunct Prof. Steve Tyacke, 3 credits)

This course will provide students with a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of energy law, covering federal and state authorities relating to electricity, oil and natural gas.  Exercises and assignments will focus on the development of energy law, in-depth case studies, and the administrative hearing process.  The course is designed to prepare students to enter legal practice with a working knowledge of the key energy legal authorities and the economic and social policy concerns that affect this field. 

Prerequisite: Administrative Law

LAWS 793/4 Topics: Constitutional Litigation Practicum (Prof. Teresa Collett, 5 credits)

This course will provide students an opportunity to enhance their effectiveness as litigators in many areas such as development of claims or defenses, trial strategy, direct examination, use of documentary evidence, expert testimony, and dispositive motions.  In addition to exploring constitutional doctrine in a given area, the students will work as teams litigating simulated cases that raise cutting-edge constitutional issues within that area.

LAWS 793/6 Topics: Law and Theology (Prof. Dan Griffith, 3 credits)

One need not be a theologian or theologically trained to take this course. Law and Theology is an ecumenical, inter-religious and interdisciplinary course which seeks to explore the intersection of law, theology, and religion in American society and culture. This course will bring together various streams of theological thought and academic disciplines to tell the story of this vital and, at times, controversial relationship. While the theological thought of various world religions and Christian denominations will be explored, Catholic thought will be given special attention in the course. The course will be divided into two sections. The first section of the course will be foundational. In this section, students will explore a number of theological foundations of and influences on law: biblical justice; theological anthropology; Christian ethics; and theological influences on jurisprudence. The second section of the course, which will comprise the bulk of the course, will explore specific issues related to the intersection of law and theology: race; gender; gays and lesbians; evolution; education; abortion; euthanasia; the environment; freedom of religion and conscience; and religion in politics. All views are welcome in the course.

LAWS 793/7 Topics: Business Planning Practicum (Prof. Lyman Johnson, 2 credits)

This course is a transactional, problem-oriented offering that would require students to substantially enrich their understanding of business associations, business tax, securities regulation, and other areas in the context of advising clients.  It is a planning course, not litigation-oriented.  It emphasizes developing the knowledge, perspective, and professional habits and approaches used by an accomplished business lawyer to counsel clients on a complex business venture.  It builds on other offerings in the current business law curriculum but deepens student understanding by requiring them to engage in lawyer-like tasks and create lawyer-like written products. The course will only meet for the first seven weeks of the semester.

Prerequisites: Business Associations and Federal Income Taxation

LAWS 793/8 Topics: Ethical Leadership for Organizations (Profs. Neil Hamilton and Tom Holloran, 1 credit)

The educational objective of this course is both to introduce the students to the basic principles of effective leadership and organizational management and to foster the habit of actively seeking feedback, moral dialogue on the tough calls, and self-reflection.  This course is oriented toward specific practical capacities and skills needed by and the practical problems faced by officers of organizations.  Leaders of student organizations at the law school are encouraged to enroll in this course.  The course will meet on the afternoons of August 23 and 24, and for two-hour sessions on three Friday afternoons later in the semester.

LAWS 793/12 Topics: Economic Methods for Legal Analysis (Prof. Francesco Parisi and Prof. Barbara Luppi, 2 credits)

The course provides the analytical foundations for legal practice in the modern world – a world in which sound legal advice requires the mastery of the techniques and language of disciplines such as economics, decision theory and game theory. After a brief review of the methodology of law and economics, this course exposes students to a broad survey of micro-economics, decision-theory and game-theory concepts. These analytical methods play a crucial role in the design and understanding of legal rules. The second part of the course builds on these premises to study the economic structure of several areas of law. Through this course students will develop a framework for the analysis of legal rules that will aid them in the remainder of their legal studies and professional life.

(Relatively) New Courses in Fall 2012 – i.e., still too new to have permanent course numbers and descriptions:

Topics: Insurance Law (Adjunct Prof. Brett Olander, 2 credits)

This course covers the principles, content and practical application of insurance law for future lawyers practicing in the area of bodily injury and property damage claims.  Topics covered include policy language and how it is interpreted; who is covered and for what perils are there coverage; how can coverage be acquired, limited or lost; the relationship between the attorney, the insurance carrier and the client; the scope of representation; how to protect the client’s interests; and how to recognize and avoid problem areas in the practice of insurance law.  The course will focus on automobile insurance, homeowner’s coverage, business insurance and self-insurance including public bodies as well as federal versus state regulation and oversight.


Topics: International Finance (Prof. Wulf Kaal, 3 credits)

This course will cover issues related to international finance, transactions, policy, and regulations. The course will cover the international economic and financial environment in which firms operate, the elements of international financial transactions, the evolution of international financial markets, the costs and benefits of globalization and the structure and instruments of foreign exchange and Eurocurrency markets. The continuing expansion of U.S. capital market regulation is a major topic, as is the implementation of international accounting standards. Although the approach of this course is rooted in government policy and regulation, it introduces students to basic financial concepts and transactions. The course evaluates regulatory and legislative reforms that followed in the wake of the international financial crisis of 2008-09.

Practicum courses:

PRACTICUM courses are limited-enrollment classes in which students delve more deeply into a given area of law by working as lawyers on a simulated problem under close faculty supervision. These courses will likely fill up quickly, as they provide a terrific opportunity to develop your practical skills by combining doctrinal knowledge and real-world legal work. Practicum courses are also designed to provide opportunities for extensive feedback and mentoring. For the fall semester, we will introduce three new practicum courses:

Business Planning (Prof. Johnson): This two-credit course meets for four hours each week for the first half of the semester, concluding after seven weeks. The course is a transactional, problem-oriented offering that will substantially enrich students’ understanding of business associations, business tax, securities regulation, intellectual property, and other areas, but will do so in the context of advising clients on how to form and finance a start-up biotech venture. It is a planning course, not litigation-oriented. It emphasizes developing the knowledge, perspective, and professional habits and approaches used by an accomplished business lawyer to counsel clients on a complex business venture. It builds on other offerings in the current business law curriculum but deepens student understanding by requiring them to engage in lawyer-like tasks and create lawyer-like written products. Business Associations and Federal Income Taxation are prerequisites.

Constitutional Litigation (Prof. Collett): This five-credit course will provide students an opportunity to enhance their effectiveness as a litigator in many areas such as development of claims or defense, trial strategy, direct examination, including use of documentary evidence, expert testimony, and dispositive motions. Enrollment will be limited to eight students.

Energy Law (Adjunct Prof. Tyacke): This three-credit course will provide students with a working knowledge of the fundamental principles of energy law, covering federal and state authorities relating to electricity, oil and natural gas. Exercises and assignments will focus on the development of energy law, in-depth case studies, and the administrative hearing process. The course is designed to prepare students to enter legal practice with a working knowledge of the key energy legal authorities and the economic and social policy concerns that affect this field. Administrative Law is a prerequisite.

New Clinics in 2012-13:

Information about registration for clinics has been provided separately.

  • Advanced Commutations Clinic
  • Bankruptcy Litigation Clinic / Advanced Bankruptcy Litigation Clinic
  • Misdemeanor Defense Clinic
  • Nonprofit Organizations Clinic / Advanced Nonprofit Organizations Clinic

New Adjunct Faculty in Fall 2012 (links to online bios):

Courses Eligible to Satisfy Upper Level Writing Requirement:

The Policy Manual explains the Upper-Level Writing requirement. Some courses entail papers that may be expanded to satisfy the requirement: Advanced Corporations (Joyce), Crime & Punishment (Shea),* First Amendment: Religious Liberties (Berg), and Law & Theology (Griffith). You may also write a paper that satisfies the requirement outside a course; just contact a faculty member about supervising you. You can enroll in a supervised research course for one or two credits, or if you do not need the credits, you can simply write the paper under the faculty member’s supervision without receiving course credit. Please read and follow the requirements set forth by Policy III-B-4. Please read and follow it carefully. Note that you must have the supervising faculty member’s written permission before registering for Supervised Research.

Supervised Research Registration Approval Form. (Return to Jill Akervik)

* For Prof. Shea’s Crime & Punishment course, he will permit five students to satisfy the upper-level writing requirement and obtain one additional credit for supervised research by writing a 7500-word paper in conjunction with the course. If you are interested, please submit a one-paragraph email to Prof. Shea by April 13 describing your topic and why you would like Prof. Shea to supervise you. You may enroll in the course without writing a paper that would satisfy the upper-level writing requirement.

Courses Offered in 2012-13 that are Unlikely to be Offered in 2013-14:

Elective courses are offered yearly or in alternate years according to student demand, faculty availability, and other factors. We cannot guarantee that any course will be offered in a given year; but for your planning, the following courses are particularly unlikely to be offered in 2013-14, so consider taking a course on this list in Fall 2012 or Spring 2013 if you are particularly interested in it.

Fall 2012 Courses

  • Sentencing Law (Prof. Osler)
  • Business Planning Practicum (Prof. Johnson)

Spring 2013 Courses (tentative)

Courses with Special Enrollment Procedures:

The following courses have special registration materials or procedures.  You will not be able to register for them online.  

Course Contact Instructions                   
Clinics Kathy Mann Arnott Enrollment for 2012-13 determined spring 2012
Business Externship Associate Dean Rob Vischer  Instructions
Interscholastic Moot Court, Negotiation, and Mock Trial
Teams 
Prof. Mark Osler Membership Already Determined  
Judicial Externship  Assistant Dean Lisa Brabbit  Instructions
Legal Analysis Review  Scott Swanson  Instructions
Public Interest Externship  Sara Sommarstrom  Instructions

Trial Advocacy
(Aug. 20-24 with Prof. de la Vega)
(This class is limited to rising 3Ls)

 LuAnn Hudson Email resume and paragraph to LuAnn explaining interest in course and relevant background by 12 PM on 4/13

 

Intensive Course Before the Regular Semester Begins:

Crime & Punishment (Prof. Shea) will be offered from August 20-24.  You may enroll in it through Murphy Online as a Fall 2012 course, and it will count toward your total number of fall credits. The course will provide an opportunity for students to examine and confront one of the most vexing criminal justice issues of our time: how should we punish those who break our laws.  Guest speakers will include prosecutors and defense attorneys, judges and other court personnel, offenders, and others involved in reform efforts.  The class will meet for parts of each morning and afternoon, with individual and group assignments to be completed most evenings.  The upper-level writing requirement can be satisfied through this class for a limited number of students by taking an additional credit of Supervised Writing and Research and by permission of the instructor only (contact Professor Hank Shea).  Grading will be based on a final paper in lieu of an exam, on journal assignments, and on class participation.  Note: The final paper and most of the journal assignments will not be due till later in the semester, with the due dates to be set by Professor Shea after consulting with the class.

Trial Advocacy (Adjunct Prof. de la Vega) will be offered from August 20-24.  You must apply by sending a one-paragraph explanation of your interest, along with your resume, to LuAnn Hudson by noon on Friday, April 13. 

Registration - The Mechanics

Courses Outside of UST Law:

Law school policies permit you to receive credits for courses outside UST Law, but limit the number of credits permitted.  Read these policies carefully, and contact Jill Akervik or Dean Vischer with questions.

Prerequisites:

Please PAY ATTENTION to prerequisites (marked with Xs in Class Finder).  You will not be permitted to register for a course without having completed the prerequisite(s). NOTE that required upper-level courses (Business Associations, Evidence, Professional Responsibility, and Lawyering Skills III) are prerequisites for a number of elective courses and externships. 

REMINDER: Subject-Area Pages on the UST Law Website:

To help you in course planning for your legal-practice interest, and to link you to UST Law faculty and other resources for particular subject areas and practice areas, visit the pages on the website in the “Academics” section.  The pages are in the areas of:

 

Wait Lists:

To prevent overcrowding of wait lists, each student will be allowed to place himself/herself on a wait list for only two courses that have otherwise closed; if you place yourself on more, you will be removed from them.  You cannot move yourself from a waitlist into a course.  If a spot opens up in a course, Jill Akervik will contact you by e-mail and you will have 24 hours to respond before she offers the spot to the next person on the list. Waitlists will be processed weekly.

Adding/Dropping Courses:

Please consult the law school policy manual regarding limitations on adding and dropping courses: Information on Adding/Dropping Courses. Note that a student’s ability to drop clinic or externship courses is more limited.
Should you drop a course or withdraw from the university, your tuition refund will be calculated according to the following schedule (subject to federal regulations regarding Title IV federal financial aid):

 

Through the 14th calendar day of the term  100%
From the 15th-21st calendar day of the term  80%
From the 22nd-28th calendar day of the term  60%
From the 29-35th calendar day of the term  40%
From the 36th-42nd calendar day of the term  20%
After the 42nd day of the term   0%

Limits on Student Employment:

During any semester in which you are enrolled as a full-time student, you may not engage in employment for more than 20 hours per week.  See Policy III-D-2. Do not arrange your schedule with the expectation of working more than that number.  This limitation is required by the American Bar Association, which has recently reemphasized it in reaccrediting UST Law.  We expect that you will abide by the limit.  It is also enforced through course attendance policies under which there are grading penalties for excessive absences.

Course Cancellations:

If enrollment in any course following completion of registration is so low that offering the course is not justified, we may cancel the course.  We will inform each of the students who had registered for the course that it has been cancelled and will offer them an opportunity to enroll in any course for which enrollment limits have not been satisfied.