Holloran Center

for Ethical Leadership in the Professions

Research Summaries or Highlights

Class of 2013 Outcome Evaluation Study:  Professionalism / Professional Formation

We are currently analyzing data from our second outcome evaluation study of professionalism capacities, in which we invited members of the UST School of Law Class of 2013 to participate. We will post a summary of our findings here within the next month. 

Law Firm Competency Models and Student Professional Success: Building on a Foundation of Professional Formation/ Professionalism
In this article, Professor Neil Hamilton reports on his recent study of 14 law firms that revealed key competencies needed for success in the first years of one's law career. Hamilton frames his study as knowledge important to helping students obtain employment in a tough market. He states that "law students and law schools have an opportunity created by the convergence of (1) significant employment market changes for law graduates, (2) sharp declines in law school applications, (3) increased applicant attention to each school’s employment outcomes, (4) law firm development of competency models to assess associate development, and (5) the high probability of accreditation changes emphasizing each student’s competency to represent clients and participate ethically in the profession."

Citation:  Hamilton, Neil W., Law-Firm Competency Models and Student Professional Success: Building on a Foundation of Professional Formation/Professionalism (2013). U of St. Thomas (Minnesota) Legal Studies Research Paper No. 13-22. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2271410 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2271410

Class of 2012 Outcome Evaluation Study:  Professionalism / Professional Formation

The results of our first longitudinal study with the 2012 graduating class of moral reasoning and ethical professional identity show statistically significant growth from matriculation to graduation. Additional data from a national survey of law students shows that our students rate our curriculum as more effective at helping them define a personal code of ethics and values than students at comparable law schools. Together, these results are convincing that our law school is uniquely effective at fostering moral growth in each student. 

Citation: Hamilton, Neil W., Monson, Verna and Organ, Jerome M., Empirical Evidence that Legal Education Can Foster Student Professionalism/Professional Formation to Become an Effective Lawyer (January 22, 2013). University of St. Thomas Law Journal, 2013, Forthcoming ; U of St. Thomas Legal Studies Research Paper No. 13-01. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2205447

 

Selected Holloran Center Blog Articles

The following are excerpted blog articles from the Holloran Center blog, currently on hiatus. These are short articles that provide summaries of our larger research and scholarship agenda. 

Professionalism’s Foundation is an Internalized Responsibility for Others

Published on: Aug 28, 2012
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2012/08/28/

Law Firms Can Foster Professionalism and Relationship Skills
Published on: Jun 26, 2012
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
Brady Janzen, Research Assistant
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2012/06/26/

Teamwork Skills Are Critical for Effective Lawyering
Published on: Apr 18, 2012
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
Verna Monson, Ph.D., Research Fellow, Holloran Center
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2012/04/18/

Do You Have a Personal Board of Directors?
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
Kurtis Young (3L student at UST Law)
[published in Minnesota Lawyer, Dec. 19, 2011]
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/12/19/371/

How Exemplary Lawyers in Minnesota Understand Professionalism
Published on: Oct. 11, 2011
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
Verna Monson, Ph.D., Research Fellow, Holloran Center
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/11/07/

The Need for Auditing of Law School Admission Data
Published on: Oct 4, 2011
@ Jerry Organ, Professor of Law and Associate Director, Holloran Center
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/10/04/364/

Do the Math: The Complex Equation of Fostering an Ethical Professional Identity
@ Verna Monson, Ph.D., Research Fellow, Holloran Center
Published on: May 12, 2011
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/05/12

Competency Models and the “New Normal” Market
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
Published April 18, 2011 in Minnesota Lawyer
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/05/02/

The following is a four-part series that offers a preview of the Holloran Center’s research on professionalism in law.

The Meaning of Professionalism: Highlights From Our Research
(c) Verna E. Monson, Ph.D.
Research Fellow, Holloran Center 

Part 1. A Preview of Our Research and Approach
Published on: Wednesday, January 19th, 2011
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/01/19/

Part 2. The Meaning of Professionalism in Law:  Ethical Professional Identity Formation
Published on: Monday, April 18th, 2011
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/04/18

Part 3. Professionalism and Women in Law:  Firm Culture and Mentors
Published on: Thursday, May 26th, 2011
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/05/

Part 4. Gender Disparities in Leadership in the Professions: The Role of Stereotype Threat
Published on: Tuesday, September 13th, 2011
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/09/

A Sporting Theory of Representation
Published Feb. 21, 2011 in Minnesota Lawyer
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
 http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2011/02/21/

Vocation and the Well-Considered Life
Published on: Thursday, September 9th, 2010
@ Jerry Organ, Professor of Law and Associate Director, Holloran Center|
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2010/09/09

The Profession and Professionalism are Dead? A Review of Thomas Morgan's "The Vanishing American Lawyer"
Published on: Oct 10, 2010
© Neil Hamilton, Professor of Law and Director, Holloran Center
http://blogs.stthomas.edu/ethicalleadership/2010/10/10/