Kari Zimmerman portrait

Kari Zimmerman

Assistant Professor
Degree
PhD, Latin American History
Stanford University, 2009
Office
JRC 410
Phone
651-962-5707

Dr. Zimmerman received her Ph.D. in Latin American History from Stanford University in 2010 and also holds a Masters in Latin American Studies from the University of California, Los Angeles. She is currently revising her book manuscript Women of Independent Means: Female Entrepreneurs and Property Owners in Rio de Janeiro, 1869-1904. Her research and teaching areas include Modern Latin America with a particular emphasis on Brazil, social and economic history of Brazil, African slavery in the Americas, and women and gender in the Atlantic World.

 

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 112 - 04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 401
CRN: 41681 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - P1 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 401
CRN: 41682 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 298 - 03 Church in Latin America - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 325
CRN: 21253 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman In this course we will study Christian theology and practice in a context of great suffering and struggle. We analyze the various forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America from the period of the Spanish Conquest to the present. We will study the history of the Church in Latin America, but more importantly we will examine the theological issues raised in each era to see how Christians have lived their faith under different circumstances. As we examine the complex interplay of Church, poverty, and power in Latin American history, we will examine theologies and spiritualities of evangelization, liberation, martyrdom, poverty, and the Church. We will also study and critique specifically Latin American methods and approaches to the theological task itself. Finally, we will examine the coming of the Latin American Church to the United States through immigration. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 04 Church in Latin America - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 247
CRN: 22150 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman In this course we will study Christian theology and practice in a context of great suffering and struggle. We analyze the various forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America from the period of the Spanish Conquest to the present. We will study the history of the Church in Latin America, but more importantly we will examine the theological issues raised in each era to see how Christians have lived their faith under different circumstances. As we examine the complex interplay of Church, poverty, and power in Latin American history, we will examine theologies and spiritualities of evangelization, liberation, martyrdom, poverty, and the Church. We will also study and critique specifically Latin American methods and approaches to the theological task itself. Finally, we will examine the coming of the Latin American Church to the United States through immigration. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 464 - 01 Capstone: Labor in Atl World - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 247
CRN: 22156 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman This seminar examines the major historical interpretations of labor in the Atlantic World from the 18th to the mid-20th centuries. The Atlantic Ocean served as a crossroads for new forms and concepts of economic activity between Europe, Africa, North and South America. Situating our interpretation within this Atlantic World, the course reconsiders how we define labor history and its influences. Students will critically analyze how key issues in labor can transcend geographical boundaries as well as conceptual frameworks such as race, ethnicity, gender and class. After discussing the historiography and methodology of investigations on both labor and the Atlantic World, students will conduct their own research on work within a global context. History seminars involve students (primarily, though not exclusively, majors and minors) with the methodological and historiographical dimensions of research in the seminar's topic. Students in the seminar will complete and present to other members of the class a significant research project. Prerequisites: at least three History courses numbered 200 or above, including at least one of the following: HIST 240, 241, 244, 253, 348, 349.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 455 - 01 Church in Latin America - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 325
CRN: 22166 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Angela M. Senander, Kari E. Zimmerman In this course we will study Christian theology and practice in a context of great suffering and struggle. We analyze the various forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America from the period of the Spanish Conquest to the present. We will study the history of the Church in Latin America, but more importantly we will examine the theological issues raised in each era to see how Christians have lived their faith under different circumstances. As we examine the complex interplay of Church, poverty, and power in Latin American history, we will examine theologies and spiritualities of evangelization, liberation, martyrdom, poverty, and the Church. We will also study and critique specifically Latin American methods and approaches to the theological task itself. Finally, we will examine the coming of the Latin American Church to the United States through immigration. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
THEO 455 - 02 Church in Latin America - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 247
CRN: 22167 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Angela M. Senander, Kari E. Zimmerman In this course we will study Christian theology and practice in a context of great suffering and struggle. We analyze the various forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America from the period of the Spanish Conquest to the present. We will study the history of the Church in Latin America, but more importantly we will examine the theological issues raised in each era to see how Christians have lived their faith under different circumstances. As we examine the complex interplay of Church, poverty, and power in Latin American history, we will examine theologies and spiritualities of evangelization, liberation, martyrdom, poverty, and the Church. We will also study and critique specifically Latin American methods and approaches to the theological task itself. Finally, we will examine the coming of the Latin American Church to the United States through immigration. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)