Spring 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - 01 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 201
CRN: 21514 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David N. Foote This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - 02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 414
CRN: 21515 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann F. Brodeur This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - 03 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 414
CRN: 22143 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann F. Brodeur This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 246
CRN: 20439 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth A. Harry The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 246
CRN: 20440 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth A. Harry The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 03 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 307
CRN: 21516 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William M. Cavert The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 05 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 414
CRN: 22144 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William M. Cavert The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 06 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 201
CRN: 22145 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William M. Cavert The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - 01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 118
CRN: 20534 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne L. Osler Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - 02 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 118
CRN: 20441 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne L. Osler Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 01 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MCH 229
CRN: 20442 4 Credit Hours Instructor: George M. Woytanowitz Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 117
CRN: 20443 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David C. Williard Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 05 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 246
CRN: 22146 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Meliha Ceric Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 06 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 246
CRN: 22147 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Meliha Ceric Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 41 Honors Mod Us/Global Perspect M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 201
CRN: 20173 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David C. Williard Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 201
CRN: 20535 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelly L. Donahue This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414
CRN: 20933 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelly L. Donahue This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 414
CRN: 21252 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Zsolt Nagy This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 04 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414
CRN: 22148 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Zsolt Nagy This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 01 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 MHC 206
CRN: 21135 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Patti H. Kameya This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 02 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 206
CRN: 22149 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Patti H. Kameya This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 03 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 231
CRN: 22968 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Patti H. Kameya This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 03 Church in Latin America - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 325
CRN: 21253 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Angela M. Senander, Kari E. Zimmerman In this course we will study Christian theology and practice in a context of great suffering and struggle. We analyze the various forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America from the period of the Spanish Conquest to the present. We will study the history of the Church in Latin America, but more importantly we will examine the theological issues raised in each era to see how Christians have lived their faith under different circumstances. As we examine the complex interplay of Church, poverty, and power in Latin American history, we will examine theologies and spiritualities of evangelization, liberation, martyrdom, poverty, and the Church. We will also study and critique specifically Latin American methods and approaches to the theological task itself. Finally, we will examine the coming of the Latin American Church to the United States through immigration. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 04 Church in Latin America - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 247
CRN: 22150 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Angela M. Senander, Kari E. Zimmerman In this course we will study Christian theology and practice in a context of great suffering and struggle. We analyze the various forms that Christianity has taken in Latin America from the period of the Spanish Conquest to the present. We will study the history of the Church in Latin America, but more importantly we will examine the theological issues raised in each era to see how Christians have lived their faith under different circumstances. As we examine the complex interplay of Church, poverty, and power in Latin American history, we will examine theologies and spiritualities of evangelization, liberation, martyrdom, poverty, and the Church. We will also study and critique specifically Latin American methods and approaches to the theological task itself. Finally, we will examine the coming of the Latin American Church to the United States through immigration. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: THEO 101 (or 102 and 103) and one 200-level or 300-level THEO course, and PHIL 115

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 05 War & Peace in Middle Ages - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 326
CRN: 22151 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann F. Brodeur Much of our modern expectations of the conduct of warfare are rooted in the Middle Ages: what is a just war? what are the rules of war and of peace? This course will examine the ethos and ethics of war and peace in the Middle Ages, from the late Roman world to 1453. Students will examine the interplay between war, politics and society, as well as the relationships between the peace movements, emergent just war theory, and chivalry in the context of major conflicts such as the Crusades and the Hundred Years’ War.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 333 - 01 East-Centr Eur Monarchy to EU - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 SCB 329
CRN: 22384 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Zsolt Nagy This course is an examination of the history of East-Central Europe from 1848 to 2010. The subject of our study is one of the most fascinating places one can learn about. The "other Europe," as some people refer to it, is a multiethnic and multicultural region with a turbulent history. The geographical focus of our course will be Poland, Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, and the former Yugoslavia. The course allows students to gain knowledge of the region's history and culture. It promises to be a captivating ride, for the "land between" often served as a laboratory for the various ideological and political movements of the nineteenth and twentieth century (liberalism, nationalism, fascism, socialism/communism, capitalism etc.). Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 355 - 01 Civil War Era M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 117
CRN: 22153 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David C. Williard The American Civil War was a pivotal event, followed by incomplete efforts at changing the shape of the nation through Reconstruction. The causes of the war, its conduct on both sides, and the consequences of this "War of Rebellion," including Reconstruction, form the three parts of this course. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 366 - 01 Hist-American Catholic Church - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 208
CRN: 22155 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne Klejment Analysis of the American Catholic church from the mission era through the post Vatican II period, with emphasis on the diverse populations who have comprised the American Catholic church throughout its history. The focus of the course examines the changing relationship between Catholics, their church, and American society. Topics analyzed include anti-Catholicism and nativism; slavery and other forms of racial and ethnic injustice; economic justice and peace; ethnic and gendered spiritualities; the nature of the pre-Vatican II and post-Vatican II Catholic church. Extensive use of sources generated by minority American Catholics emphasize the rich thought and religious experiences of Catholics from diverse backgrounds. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 366 - 02 Hist-American Catholic Church M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 208
CRN: 22899 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne Klejment Analysis of the American Catholic church from the mission era through the post Vatican II period, with emphasis on the diverse populations who have comprised the American Catholic church throughout its history. The focus of the course examines the changing relationship between Catholics, their church, and American society. Topics analyzed include anti-Catholicism and nativism; slavery and other forms of racial and ethnic injustice; economic justice and peace; ethnic and gendered spiritualities; the nature of the pre-Vatican II and post-Vatican II Catholic church. Extensive use of sources generated by minority American Catholics emphasize the rich thought and religious experiences of Catholics from diverse backgrounds. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 386 - 01 Historical Archaeology M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211
CRN: 22154 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ivancica D. Schrunk The course offers an understanding of archaeological theories, methods, and interpretations in discovering, reconstructing, and understanding past societies in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Australia, and Europe. Archaeology primarily deals with material remains of societies and time periods that lack written documents. Historical archaeology combines the methods of archaeology with analysis of written and oral sources. Together, archaeology and history provide a critical reappraisal of historical events and cultural change around the world. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 464 - 01 Capstone: Labor in Atl World - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 247
CRN: 22156 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman This seminar examines the major historical interpretations of labor in the Atlantic World from the 18th to the mid-20th centuries. The Atlantic Ocean served as a crossroads for new forms and concepts of economic activity between Europe, Africa, North and South America. Situating our interpretation within this Atlantic World, the course reconsiders how we define labor history and its influences. Students will critically analyze how key issues in labor can transcend geographical boundaries as well as conceptual frameworks such as race, ethnicity, gender and class. After discussing the historiography and methodology of investigations on both labor and the Atlantic World, students will conduct their own research on work within a global context. History seminars involve students (primarily, though not exclusively, majors and minors) with the methodological and historiographical dimensions of research in the seminar's topic. Students in the seminar will complete and present to other members of the class a significant research project. Prerequisites: at least three History courses numbered 200 or above, including at least one of the following: HIST 240, 241, 244, 253, 348, 349.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 112 - 01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 JRC 201
CRN: 30250 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William M. Cavert The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - 01 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - - - - 1730 - 2130 JRC 246
CRN: 30094 Instructor: Meliha Ceric Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 01 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1730 - 2130 JRC 247
CRN: 30430 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelly L. Donahue This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - 01 Middle East and North Africa M - W - - - - 1730 - 2130 JRC 201
CRN: 30096 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Hasan Karatas This course will introduce students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa with special attention to the impact of successive Islamic movements that shaped the modern-day political system of Islam and that continues to inform their interactions with Europe and the West today. The organizing theme of the course is "Contact and Change," which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
HIST 111 - 02 Origins: Mod World to 1550 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 222
CRN: 40191 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ann F. Brodeur This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - 03 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 414
CRN: 41664 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David N. Foote This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 111 - 04 Origins: Mod World to 1550 M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 414
CRN: 41665 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David N. Foote This course examines significant political, social, economic, religious and cultural developments of ancient Near East, ancient India, Greco-Roman civilizations, ancient and medieval China, ancient Japan, Islamic civilization, ancient African and American societies, and Medieval and Renaissance Europe. As beliefs and social- political concepts and practices of various civilizations formulated and developed during this period still heavily influence our modern world, this course provides a foundation to our understanding of the highly interdependent and interrelated contemporary world. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 01 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 201
CRN: 41014 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William M. Cavert The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 02 Hist Mod World Since 1550 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 SCB 206
CRN: 42469 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William M. Cavert The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 112 - 04 Hist Mod World Since 1550 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 414
CRN: 41478 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman The Modern World Since 1550 surveys the sixteenth century European foundation and expansion throughout the world down to the end of the twentieth century. The course examines the resulting breakthroughs in communication and cultural exchanges between Western civilization and the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an interdependent global civilization. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - 01 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 201
CRN: 40192 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Meliha Ceric Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - 02 Early Am/Global Perspective - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 201
CRN: 40193 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Meliha Ceric Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - 03 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 325
CRN: 40194 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne L. Osler Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 113 - 04 Early Am/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 SCB 325
CRN: 42102 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne L. Osler Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of North America from the European-American encounter through the aftermath of the U.S. Civil War. Special emphasis is given to the relation of minority groups (American Indians, African Americans, Hispanic peoples, European immigrants, etc.) to the dominant culture. Major themes include: colonization, slavery, revolution, nation building, territorial expansion, industrialization, reform movements, nativism, sectionalism, and the Civil War. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 02 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 106
CRN: 40506 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David C. Williard Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 114 - 03 Mod Us/Global Perspective M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 201
CRN: 40459 4 Credit Hours Instructor: George M. Woytanowitz Social, political, cultural, and economic history of the peoples of the United States from the Reconstruction period following the Civil War to the present. Special emphasis is given to the relation of racial minorities, ethnic groups, and immigrants to the dominant culture, and to the changing role of the U.S. within its larger global context. Major themes include: Reconstruction, domestic and overseas expansion, industrialization, racism and nativism, world wars, cold war, movements of liberation and reform, and other contemporary issues. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 01 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 118
CRN: 40560 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelly L. Donahue This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 02 The World Since 1900 M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 414
CRN: 41480 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelly L. Donahue This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 03 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 414
CRN: 41297 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth A. Harry This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 04 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 201
CRN: 41809 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Zsolt Nagy This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 115 - 05 The World Since 1900 - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 206
CRN: 42103 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Zsolt Nagy This course is an introduction to the history of the world since 1900. Students will learn about the historical processes that led to the emergence of an interdependent world in the 21st century. Topics will include: the establishment of Europe's world hegemony in the years leading up to World War I, the internal conflicts which beset European civilization in the years between the wars, in particular, the rise of Communism and Fascism and the world economic crisis of the 1930's which pushed Europe and Asia toward World War II. Students will also examine the character of the world order that emerged after 1945, the origins of the Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union, and the problems of some of the nations newly emerging from colonial domination. Finally, we discuss the role of religion and international politics in one major world religion: the Middle East. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. -- -- --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 116 - 01 Afr Amer Hist Glob Persp M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 222
CRN: 42471 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne Klejment An introductory social history survey of African-American experience in global perspective. This course will cover developments from the beginnings of the trans-Atlantic slave trade through the present. Topics include: West African cultures; origins of the international slave trade; African American life in the colonies and during the Revolution; development of slavery in global comparative perspective; resistance to slavery; and the role of African Americans in the Civil War and Reconstruction eras; Jim Crow culture; African American culture; migration; black nationalism and independent Africa; the freedom movements of the North and South; and African American popular culture. This course fulfills the general education requirement in historical studies.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - 01 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 JRC 247
CRN: 42474 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Hasan Karatas This course will introduce students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa with special attention to the impact of successive Islamic movements that shaped the modern-day political system of Islam and that continues to inform their interactions with Europe and the West today. The organizing theme of the course is "Contact and Change," which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 118 - 02 Middle East and North Africa - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MCH 118
CRN: 42475 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Hasan Karatas This course will introduce students to the history and cultures of the Middle East and North Africa with special attention to the impact of successive Islamic movements that shaped the modern-day political system of Islam and that continues to inform their interactions with Europe and the West today. The organizing theme of the course is "Contact and Change," which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 01 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 233
CRN: 41344 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Patti H. Kameya This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 119 - 02 East Asian Civilizations M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 233
CRN: 41808 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Patti H. Kameya This course uses a culture of East Asia (China or Japan) as a focal point for investigating the history of the region. Students will gain a broad‐based historical and cultural understanding of East Asia in its global context, beginning with the origins of this culture, and including its inter‐regional connections and its encounters with the West. In this way, this course addresses the preconception that East Asia existed unchanged until the arrival of Europeans. The theme of this course is “Contact and Change,” which will afford an opportunity to examine two of the principal challenges facing historians: accounting for change and understanding people and societies separated from us by space and time. This course fulfills the Historical Studies requirement in the core curriculum. Fall semester focuses on Japan; spring semester focuses on China.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HIST 203 - 01 Ancient Egypt and Near East M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 481
CRN: 42478 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Ivancica D. Schrunk A historical, comparative survey of the origins and diversity of human societies in northeastern Africa (Egypt, Nubia) and western Asia (Anatolia, Levant, Mesopotamia, Arabia, Persia), from the earliest organized political and religious communities to the Arab conquest (8000 B.C. to A.D. 750). Historical processes of special emphasis will include: transition to agriculture; urbanization; state and empire building; emergence of major religious traditions; migrations and cultural crosscurrents. Topics will be explored taking into account the latest textual and archaeological evidence. The course should provide historical understanding of the current ethnic, linguistic, and religious diversity in the region.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 226 - 01 Modern Europe since 1914 - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 206
CRN: 42479 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Zsolt Nagy This course is a close examination of twentieth century European history or, as some historians refer to it, the "short twentieth century" of the "dark continent." It follows the cultural, social, economic, and political development of Europe through wars and reconstruction. Topics include, but are not limited to, imperial and national rivalry, WW I and its aftermath, Russian Revolution, Fascism and Nazism, WW II and its aftermath, Cold War and the division of Europe, 1989, and the emergence of the European Union.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 244 - 01 Modern East Asia M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 211
CRN: 42473 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Patti H. Kameya In this course, we will read about and discuss the development of "modern" societies in China, Korea, and Japan from early modern times to the present. We will focus on problems such as empire, historical memory, and the formation of modern nation-states. Readings include memoirs and other personal writings as historical texts, as a way to understand the times.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 253 - 01 Cities of the Middle East - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 247
CRN: 42476 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Hasan Karatas A survey of the history of major cities in the Middle East and North Africa. This course will trace the region's history through the foundation and development of the cities that served as the centers of significant political entities since 600 A.D. Each week will focus on the symbolism and functionality of urban space and architecture and the role of politics, religion, and global trade in the formation of one of the following cities: Jerusalem, Mecca and Madina, Baghdad, Cairo, Istanbul, Isfahan, Beirut and Algiers. The course will seek an answer to the question of whether history shapes the city or the city shapes history.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 298 - 01 Women/Family in the Americas - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 414
CRN: 42477 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kari E. Zimmerman This course examines how seemingly impersonal forces are historically associated with personal changes for women and the family across the Americas. We will consider how women and the family intersected with the economy, politics, and society. A comparative approach allows for consideration of national circumstances and social norms regarding race, ethnicity, and class. Examining the history of women and the family in Latin America and the US also highlights similarities and differences within the reciprocal relationship between private lives and public policy. Understanding the history of women and the family helps explain current contentions over women’s roles and modern family structures.

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 322 - 01 Tudor and Stuart Britain M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 481
CRN: 42480 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William M. Cavert England from the accession of the Tudor dynasty down to the Glorious Revolution. Modernization of English society and government. The English Reformation. Anglicanism. The Elizabethan period. Puritanism. Crown and Parliament in Tudor and Early Stuart times. Civil War, Revolution and Restoration. The Revolution of 1688. Prerequisite: One 100-level history course

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Location Time Day(s)
HIST 465 - 01 US 1960’s Social Revolution M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 329
CRN: 42472 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne Klejment The sixties decade was one of the most controversial, transformative, and colorful in U.S. history. The course will analyze and evaluate the origins, development, and consequences of “the long sixties” reform and radicalism. Topics will include: relationship to the Old Left and the Christian Left, birth of the New Left and the Catholic Left, “silent” social transformations of the 1950s, civil rights and black power movements, peace movement, women's movement, and role of activist historians. Students will discuss common readings, make presentations and lead discussions, and design and write a sequenced research paper.

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