Melissa A Lamb portrait

Melissa A Lamb

Professor
Degree
Ph.D., Stanford University
Office
OWS 118
Phone
(651) 962-5242
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5242
Mail
OWS 153

Professional Interests:

 

Research Interests:

  • Tectonics and sedimentation in the Lake Mead region, Southern Nevada
  • Tectonics of southern Mongolia
  • Geoscience education

 

Courses:

  • GEOL 110: Geology of the National Parks
  • GEOL 111: Introductory Physical Geology
  • GEOL 130: Earth History
  • GEOL 211: Mineralogy
  • GEOL 260: Regional Geology and Geological Field Methods
  • GEOL 340 and 360: Fundamentals of the Lithosphere I and II (Petrology and Structure)
  • GEOL 460: Advanced Field Methods

 

Recent Publications (last 5 years): 

Authors in bold are undergraduate students:

Lamb, M., Martin, L., Hickson, T., Umhoefer, P. & Eaton, L., (in press) Deposition and age of the lower Horse Spring Formation in the Longwell Ridges Area, southern Nevada, In Umhoefer, P., Lamb, M., and Beard, L.S. (eds), Miocene Tectonics of the Lake Mead Region Geology Society of America Special Volume. 

 Hickson, T., Ness, A., & Lamb, M., (in press) Deposition and age of the Bitter Ridge Limestone member of the Horse Spring Formation, Bitter Ridge to Gale Hills, Lake Mead, Nevada, In Umhoefer, P., Lamb, M., and Beard, L.S. (eds), Miocene Tectonics of the Lake Mead Region Geology Society of America Special Volume.

Lamb, M., Badarch, G., Navratil, T., & Poier, R., 2008, Structural and geochronologic data from the Shin Jinst area, eastern Gobi Altai, Mongolia: implications for Phanerozoic intracontinental deformation in Asia, in Sorkhabi, R. and Heydari, E, eds., Tectonopysics special  issue: Asia out of the Tethys: Geochronological, tectonic and sedimentary records, v. 451, p. 312-330, doi: 10.1016/j.tecto.2007.11.061. 

Johnson, C.L., Amory, J.A., Zinniker, D., Lamb, M.A., Graham, S.A., Affolter, M., and Badarch, G., 2008, Accretionary tectonics and sedimentation during late Paleozoic arc collision, China-Mongolia border region, In A. Draut, P. Clift, and D. Scholl, (Eds.), Formation and applications of the sedimentary record in arc collision zones, GSA Special Paper 436, p. 363-390.

Piotraschke, R.E., Ross, C.F., Lamb, M.A., and Hickson, T.A., 2008, Structural analysis in the Bitter Spring Quadrangle, Lake Mead, Nevada: unraveling a complex record of extension, Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 40, p. 84. (Joint Meeting of the Rocky Mountain and Cordillera Sections, March, Las Vegas, NV)

Spring 2016 Courses

Spring 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ESCI 430 - 51 Senior Research Seminar M - - - - - - 1530 - 1745 OSS 121
CRN: 22879 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa A. Lamb This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science as it brings together students from all of the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects. In the semester prior to the course offering, Environmental Science majors, in consultation with their faculty advisors and the course instructor, will develop a research project that they will complete as part of this course. Students may also choose to more fully develop a research project in which they have been participating or propose a service-learning or community-based project. Furthermore, groups of students could propose to perform an interdisciplinary project. The format of this research is intentionally open-ended because it is meant to provide flexibility and choice to the students and the course instructor. Student-led seminars on topics of the students' choosing will comprise most weekly meetings, along with updates on research progress and a final presentation to the St. Thomas community on the outcome of the student's research projects. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor; at least one ENVR course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 430 - D01 Senior Research Seminar M - - - F - - 1330 - 1530 OSS 127
CRN: 21355 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa A. Lamb This course is designed to fulfill the senior capstone experience in Environmental Science as it brings together students from all of the environmental science concentrations (biology, chemistry, and geology) to complete interdisciplinary research projects. In the semester prior to the course offering, Environmental Science majors, in consultation with their faculty advisors and the course instructor, will develop a research project that they will complete as part of this course. Students may also choose to more fully develop a research project in which they have been participating or propose a service-learning or community-based project. Furthermore, groups of students could propose to perform an interdisciplinary project. The format of this research is intentionally open-ended because it is meant to provide flexibility and choice to the students and the course instructor. Student-led seminars on topics of the students' choosing will comprise most weekly meetings, along with updates on research progress and a final presentation to the St. Thomas community on the outcome of the student's research projects. This course should be completed in the final Spring semester prior to graduation. Prerequisite: ESCI 310 or permission of instructor; at least one ENVR course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GEOL 115 - P2 Environmental Geology M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 124
CRN: 42872 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa A. Lamb This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - P53 Environmental Geology M - - - - - - 1245 - 1445 OSS 124
CRN: 42873 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa A. Lamb This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - P54 Environmental Geology - - - - F - - 1300 - 1500 OSS 124
CRN: 42874 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa A. Lamb This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)