Jeni McDermott portrait

Jeni McDermott

Assistant Professor
Degree
Ph.D. Arizona State University
Office
OSS 119B
Phone
(651) 962-5254
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5254

Professional Interests

Jeni’s research interests lie in understanding how fluvial systems interact with and shape our world, both at the orogen scale through the interplay between surface processes, deformation, and tectonics, as well as at a smaller scale where surface water and groundwater dynamically interact with our human environment, affecting the quality and availability of water resources while defining the very surface on which we live. 

Ph.D.: Arizona State University, 2012

M.S.: University of California, Santa Barbara, 2006

Research interests: 

  • Continental tectonics, especially neotectonics, the formation and continued development of orogenic systems, climate-erosion-tectonic feedback loops, and the role of extensional faulting in collisional orogens.
  • Low-temperature thermochronology, including single crystal apatite and zircon (U-Th)/He and muscovite and biotite 40Ar/39Ar thermochronometers.
  • Landform evolution and geomorphology, with an emphasis on using geomorphic tools and river profiles to understand tectonically active regions.
  • Water resource renewal and water quality 

Courses:

  • GEOL 115: Environmental Geology
  • GEOL 252: Earth Surface Processes and Geomorphology
  • GEOL 410: Hydrogeology
  • GEOL 460: Advanced Regional Geology and Field Methods

 

Recent Publications:

McDermott, J.A., Whipple, K.X, Hodges, K.V., van Soest, M.C. (2013) Evidence for     Plio-Pleistocene north-south extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan           Plateau, Nyalam region. Tectonics, 32, doi:10.1002/tect.20018.

McDermott, J.A., Avisar, D., Johnson, T.A., Clark, J.F. (2008). Groundwater travel times near spreading ponds: Inferences from geochemical and physical approaches. Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, vol 13, no11. 

Abstracts:

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., Whipple, K.X., van Soest, M.C. (2013) Structural, geomorphic, and thermochronologic evidence for Quaternary N-S extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau. Geological Society of America Annual Conference 2013.

McDermott, J.A., Whipple, K.X, Hodges, K.V., van Soest, M.C. (2012) Plio-Pleistocene N-S extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau as evidenced from fluvial incision patterns and thermochronology. European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2012.

McDermott, J.A., Whipple, K.X, Hodges, K.V., van Soest, M.C. (2011) Quaternary N-S extension near the Himalayan crest: An investigation using river profiles and low-temperature thermochronology. European Geosciences Union General Assembly 2011.

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., Whipple, K.X., van Soest, M.C. (2010) Exploring evidence for possible recent N-S extension along the Himalayan crest. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

Whipple, K.X., McDermott, J.A., Adams, B.A. (2010) Expression of Active Tectonics in Erosional Landscapes. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., and van Soest, M.C. (2009) Polyphase (Miocene-Pleistocene?) slip on the South Tibetan fault system in the Dhaulagiri Himalaya. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting

McDermott, J.A., Hodges, K.V., Whipple, K.X. Monteleone, B.D., van Soest, M.C., Wang, E., and Fan, C. (2008)Polyphase extension at the southern margin of the Tibetan Plateau, Ama Drime Range, Tibet.  American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting.

Clark, J.F. & McDermott, J.A. (2006) Groundwater travel times determined with geochemical and physical techniques near artificial recharge ponds. Geological Society of America annual meeting.

McDermott, J., Clark, J.F., Avisar, D., Hudson, G.B. (2005). A comparison of hydrogeologic models, tritium/3He, and deliberate tracer experiments to understand ground water residence time. American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. Also presented at 2005 Geological Society of America Cordilleran Section.

Smith, D.P., Vincent, M.M., McDermott, J.A., Carlson, Z. (2005) Quantified chronic sediment load from road construction in Garrapata watershed, a steep coastal trout stream on the Big Sur Coast, CA. Geological Society of America Cordilleran Section.

Spring 2016 Courses

Spring 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGR 123 - 01 Energy and the Environment M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OSS 329
CRN: 21842 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brittany B. Nelson-Cheeseman, Jeni A. McDermott The course examines the core concepts of energy and power technologies. A hands-on laboratory will examine how refrigerators, swamp coolers, generators, turbines, car engines and solar panels work. The class covers how electricity from fossil fuels is generated and transported, and the status of the technology behind harnessing geothermal resources, solar power, fuel cells, wind power, and biomass energy. Students will be introduced to the 1st and 2nd laws of thermodynamics, trade-off charts and the design process. The cultural, social, and economic impacts of engergy production are discussed as well as their effects on the environment. (This course is limited to non-majors or students with Freshman or Sophmore standing and it fulfills the core-area in natural science in the Natural Science and Mathematical and Quantitative Reasoning requirement in the core curriculum.)

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 01 Environmental Geology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OSS 124
CRN: 22359 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 51 Environmental Geology LAB - - W - - - - 1500 - 1700 OSS 123
CRN: 22360 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 115 - 52 Environmental Geology LAB - - - R - - - 1000 - 1200 OSS 123
CRN: 22361 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the interactions between humans and their environment, focusing on those processes and issues that are fundamentally geological in nature. Early in the course, students will be introduced to basic geoscience concepts and principals, the scientific method, plate tectonics, and earth materials (rocks and minerals). The remainder of the course will focus on specific topics at the interface between humans and their environment, including volcanic and earthquake hazards, human impacts on the hydrological cycle, surface and groundwater contamination, climate and the carbon cycle, nuclear waste storage, soil erosion, non-renewable resources, and slope stability. NOTE: Students who receive credit for GEOL 115 may not receive credit for GEOL 102, 110, 111, or 114.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 491 - I1 Research - - - - - - - -
CRN: 23187 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GEOL 252 - 01 Geomorphology M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OSS 124
CRN: 41920 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the physical processes that are responsible for shaping the Earth's surface. The qualitative description of landforms is pursued, in light of student's newly-gained analytical and quantita-tive understanding of processes. The labs focus on techniques used by geomorphologists to characterize landforms, soils, and the processes that shape them, including: air photo interpretation, analysis of digital topographic data, experimental simulation of landforms evolution, and field techniques in geomorphology. Prerequisite: one of 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115 or 161

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GEOL 252 - 51 Geomorphology LAB - - - R - - - 1330 - 1630 OSS 120
CRN: 41921 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeni A. McDermott This course emphasizes the physical processes that are responsible for shaping the Earth's surface. The qualitative description of landforms is pursued, in light of student's newly-gained analytical and quantita-tive understanding of processes. The labs focus on techniques used by geomorphologists to characterize landforms, soils, and the processes that shape them, including: air photo interpretation, analysis of digital topographic data, experimental simulation of landforms evolution, and field techniques in geomorphology. Prerequisite: one of 102, 110, 111, 113, 114, 115 or 161

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)