Gaston E. "Chip" Small portrait

Gaston E. "Chip" Small

Assistant Professor
Degree
Ph.D. University of Georgia
Office
Owens 364/Lab: Owens 254
Phone
(651) 962-5166
Toll Free
(800) 328-6819, Ext. 2-5166
Fax
651.962.5201
Mail
OWS 352
University of St. Thomas
2115 Summit Ave.
Saint Paul MN 55105

Professional Interests

  • Application of ecosystem ecology to sustainability science 
  • Human alteration of biogeochemical cycles 
  • Fate of anthropogenic nutrients in aquatic ecosystems 
  • Communicating science to the public

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 393 - I1 Individual Study - - - - - - - -
CRN: 40955 1 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 435 - 01 Aquatic Biology - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OSS 122
CRN: 41966 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small Characteristics of lakes, streams and other aquatic habitats; including plant and animal communities, water chemistry and productivity. Use of recent primary literature to learn and evaluate field techniques, data collection and data analyses. Both individual and class research projects focus on aquatic systems. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 330 or 333, or in any two 300-level biology courses; STAT 220 or MATH 303 strongly recommended

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 435 - 51 Aquatic Biology / Lab - - - R - - - 1530 - 1930 OWS 268
CRN: 41967 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small Characteristics of lakes, streams and other aquatic habitats; including plant and animal communities, water chemistry and productivity. Use of recent primary literature to learn and evaluate field techniques, data collection and data analyses. Both individual and class research projects focus on aquatic systems. Four laboratory hours per week. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C- in BIOL 330 or 333, or in any two 300-level biology courses; STAT 220 or MATH 303 strongly recommended

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
HONR 480 - W04 HONORS Astrobiology - T - - - - - 0955 - 1135 BEC 106
CRN: 43420 2 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small These interdisciplinary seminars are intended to develop integrating insights through an analysis of topics chosen from different disciplines. Often they are taught by two faculty members or by a visiting lecturer who holds one of the endowed chairs at the university.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
BIOL 480 - 01 Urban Ecosystem Ecology - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OSS 127
CRN: 22461 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small In 1800, there were around 1-billion people on the planet, and only three percent lived in urban areas. Today we are approaching 8-billion humans, and more-than half live in cities. This course explores how cities function as ecosystems and shape local, regional, and global ecological and biogeochemical processes. We will examine how carbon, nutrients, and energy enter the city in the form of food and other resources, and exit as waste, and will use this conceptual framework to assess opportunities to move towards sustainability. We will make extensive use of primary literature and apply ecological network analysis tools to contrast human-dominated ecosystems with natural ecosystems. Students will design and implement independent research projects, and will work collaboratively to apply knowledge and skills to real-world urban sustainability problems. Prerequisite: C- or better in at least two 300-level BIOL courses.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
BIOL 480 - 51 Urban Ecosystem Ecology/Lab - T - - - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 268
CRN: 22462 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small In 1800, there were around 1-billion people on the planet, and only three percent lived in urban areas. Today we are approaching 8-billion humans, and more-than half live in cities. This course explores how cities function as ecosystems and shape local, regional, and global ecological and biogeochemical processes. We will examine how carbon, nutrients, and energy enter the city in the form of food and other resources, and exit as waste, and will use this conceptual framework to assess opportunities to move towards sustainability. We will make extensive use of primary literature and apply ecological network analysis tools to contrast human-dominated ecosystems with natural ecosystems. Students will design and implement independent research projects, and will work collaboratively to apply knowledge and skills to real-world urban sustainability problems. Prerequisite: C- or better in at least two 300-level BIOL courses.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 310 - 01 Environmental Problem Solving M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OSS 127
CRN: 20748 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small This course explores methods of solving environmental problems. These problems are by nature, interdisciplinary and are rarely addressed in a substantive fashion in traditional science textbooks. In this course, students and faculty work together to develop a working model of a critical earth system or biogeochemical cycle (i.e. the carbon or nitrogen cycle), and learn how to make calculations of human-induced changes to that system. Students from all concentrations of the environmental science major will work together on this interdisciplinary research project using modeling and systems analysis software to more fully understand specific environments and the quantitative methods of assessing challenges to those environments. This course should be taken by all ESCI students during their junior year. Prerequisite: Environmental Science majors should have completed BIOL 204, CHEM 201, or GEOL 211/252. Environmental Studies (ENVR) majors that wish to take this course need to have completed one course each from BIOL, CHEM and GEOL.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ESCI 310 - 51 Envi. Problem Solving Lab - - - R - - - 1330 - 1730 OWS 264
CRN: 20964 0 Credit Hours Instructor: Gaston E. Small This course explores methods of solving environmental problems. These problems are by nature, interdisciplinary and are rarely addressed in a substantive fashion in traditional science textbooks. In this course, students and faculty work together to develop a working model of a critical earth system or biogeochemical cycle (i.e. the carbon or nitrogen cycle), and learn how to make calculations of human-induced changes to that system. Students from all concentrations of the environmental science major will work together on this interdisciplinary research project using modeling and systems analysis software to more fully understand specific environments and the quantitative methods of assessing challenges to those environments. This course should be taken by all ESCI students during their junior year. Prerequisite: Environmental Science majors should have completed BIOL 204, CHEM 201, or GEOL 211/252. Environmental Studies (ENVR) majors that wish to take this course need to have completed one course each from BIOL, CHEM and GEOL.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)