J-Term 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 217 - 01 Multicultural Literature - T W R F - - 0900 - 1200 OEC 210
CRN: 10242 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brian W. Greening This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of authors drawn from the literature of one of the following: (a) American communities of color; (b) postcolonial peoples; (c) diasporic peoples. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts from at least one such literary tradition, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 295 - 01 Topic: TBD - T - R - - - 1300 - 1600 JRC 222
CRN: 10027 2 Credit Hours Instructor: Staff The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, View Searchable Class Schedule

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Spring 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - 01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210
CRN: 21321 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Vadim B. Rubinchik Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200
CRN: 21075 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brett E. Jenkins Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210
CRN: 21076 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510
CRN: 21520 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Staff Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210
CRN: 21077 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nouchie Xiong Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940
CRN: 21078 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bethany L. Fletcher Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 51 Crit Thinking:Lit/Wrting (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040
CRN: 21759 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Suzanne L. Donsky Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 201 - 01 Shorter Than a Novel: Novella M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 212
CRN: 22458 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William T. Braun The modern novella tends to be defined more by what it isn't than what it is—neither a novel nor a short story, but somewhere in between. This course will explore the genre's terrain, asking questions about its historical evolution, its formal properties, its reputation for stylishness as evinced by the Ian McEwan quote that it is "the perfect form of prose fiction," and its contemporary appeal. Possible texts include everything from the classic (Herman Melville's BARTLEBY, THE SCRIVENER, Henry James's THE TURN OF THE SCREW, Albert Camus's THE STRANGER) to the very recent (Chris Abani's SONG OF NIGHT, xTx's BILLIE THE BULL, Tao Lin's SHOPLIFTING FROM AMERICAN APPAREL). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 201 - 02 Jazz Music & American Poetry M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 210
CRN: 22503 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucas B. Pingel This course will explore the influence of jazz music and culture in poetry, both as a source of content and as an informant of craft. We will study the relationship of improvisation and collaboration in contemporary poetry, and whether these values have shaped a distinctly "American" brand of poetry. The reading list will include such authors as Langston Hughes, Sonia Sanchez, Bob Kaufman, Frank O'Hara, and Jayne Cortez. Additionally, there will be a significant music listening portion. The writing load will consist of 15 pages of formal revised writing, and will include a close poetry explication and an independently designed research project.

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ENGL 201 - 03 The American Short Story - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 210
CRN: 21843 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelli A. Larson Even in the land of Super Targets and Big Mac hamburgers, bigger is not always better--at least not in terms of literature. Short stories, because of their compression and intensity, offer lively plots and constant surprises. To the delight of readers everywhere, American authors provide a wellspring of tales that uncover our past, define our present, and peep into our future. As we study the artistic development of the American short story, our process of discovery will be progressive, beginning with some of this country's earliest and most influential short story writers like Irving and Poe and closing with such masters of contemporary fiction as Alice Walker and Jill McCorkle. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 201 - 04 Passports: Poetry Around World - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940
CRN: 22459 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mary E. Frandson This course examines the conventions of, and development within, a literary genre during a specific period or across literary history. It may also explore the particular choices made by writers working in several genres and the effects of those choices on us as readers. The course will examine both the conventions and innovations practiced by writers working within one or more genres or periods, and may include study of the authors' reflections on their own work and the work of their fellow writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 201 - 05 American Memoir: 1950-Present - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210
CRN: 22460 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Laurie E. Lindeen Memoir has been a compelling literary form since the time of St. Augustine. In the past seventy-five years, the American memoir has changed drastically in subject matter, style, voice, audience, and literary acceptance. We will define memoir, try our hand at memoir writing and critiquing, and closely read works written by a variety of American memoirists, likely including Mary McCarthy, Patricia Hampl, Tobias Wolff, Maya Angelou, and David Sedaris. The minimum writing load for this course is 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 201 - 06 What Happens Next: Serial Lit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 210
CRN: 22461 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gordon D. Grice Much of the best literature comes in the form of serials: narrative works published in installments spread over time. Serials allow writers to work on big canvasses and sometimes even learn from audience feedback. This course will examine serials across several genres -- novels by writers like George Eliot, nonfiction by writers like Truman Capote, comix by creators like Art Spiegelman, and more. We’ll read these works the way they were meant to be experienced, always eager for the next installment. The minimum writing load for this course is 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 07 What Happens Next: Serial Lit - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210
CRN: 22462 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gordon D. Grice Much of the best literature comes in the form of serials: narrative works published in installments spread over time. Serials allow writers to work on big canvasses and sometimes even learn from audience feedback. This course will examine serials across several genres -- novels by writers like George Eliot, nonfiction by writers like Truman Capote, comix by creators like Art Spiegelman, and more. We’ll read these works the way they were meant to be experienced, always eager for the next installment. The minimum writing load for this course is 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 01 Folklore & Literature M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 210
CRN: 21844 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David T. Lawrence This class will explore the intersection of folklore, an oral communication form, and literature, a written one. Since folklore encompasses everything from legends, jokes, traditional music, fairy tales, and myth, to belief, customs, and material culture, it would be folly to imagine that literary production has not been influenced by it. We'll examine the myriad ways authors use folk genres, motifs, and culture in their creative work. This will mean reading about the fantastical and quotidian--but always the human. Authors will include Neil Gaiman, Angela Carter, William Shakespeare, Colson Whitehead, and Adrian Matejka. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 02 Folklore & Literature M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 210
CRN: 21845 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David T. Lawrence This class will explore the intersection of folklore, an oral communication form, and literature, a written one. Since folklore encompasses everything from legends, jokes, traditional music, fairy tales, and myth, to belief, customs, and material culture, it would be folly to imagine that literary production has not been influenced by it. We'll examine the myriad ways authors use folk genres, motifs, and culture in their creative work. This will mean reading about the fantastical and quotidian--but always the human. Authors will include Neil Gaiman, Angela Carter, William Shakespeare, Colson Whitehead, and Adrian Matejka. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 202 - 03 Business & American Identity M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200
CRN: 22499 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and the social world. Work has always been an integral part of American culture, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, THE NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDRICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE: WRITTEN BY HIMSELF, Christopher Buckley's THANK YOU FOR SMOKING, David Mamet's GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS, and the Enron expose, THE SMARTEST GUYS IN THE ROOM--to explore how the shifting perceptions of the world of business from pre-Civil War America to the recent dot.com boom and bust effected perceptions of work, identity, gender, race, class, and ethnicity. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 04 Business & American Identity M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320
CRN: 22463 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones This course will examine literary texts which feature the connection between the world of business and the social world. Work has always been an integral part of American culture, and individuals often identify themselves with the work that they do. Students will closely read a handful of texts--Willa Cather's A LOST LADY, THE NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDRICK DOUGLASS, AN AMERICAN SLAVE: WRITTEN BY HIMSELF, Christopher Buckley's THANK YOU FOR SMOKING, David Mamet's GLENGARRY GLEN ROSS, and the Enron expose, THE SMARTEST GUYS IN THE ROOM--to explore how the shifting perceptions of the world of business from pre-Civil War America to the recent dot.com boom and bust effected perceptions of work, identity, gender, race, class, and ethnicity. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 202 - 05 Medical Narratives M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 202
CRN: 21846 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will examine literary narratives about health and illness, considering the body's role in what Susan Sontag describes as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Alongside selected critical accounts of medicine and illness, we will focus our time on writing by George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, and others. Alongside these literary texts, we may also examine selected historical case studies: hysteria, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, HIV/AIDS, and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 202 - 06 Medical Narratives M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 202
CRN: 21822 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will examine literary narratives about health and illness, considering the body's role in what Susan Sontag describes as the "punitive and sentimental fantasies concocted" about illness. Alongside selected critical accounts of medicine and illness, we will focus our time on writing by George Eliot, Virginia Woolf, Kazuo Ishiguro, Ian McEwan, and others. Alongside these literary texts, we may also examine selected historical case studies: hysteria, tuberculosis, neurasthenia, HIV/AIDS, and others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 202 - 07 Landscapes of American Lit - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 212
CRN: 22467 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa J. Hendrickx This course will explore the United States’ topography through literature, focusing on how environmental elements influence a writer’s perspective. These environmental elements not only include natural landscapes such as mountain ranges, deserts, waterways, etc., but also constructed cityscapes. Possible authors include: Thoreau, Whitman, Cather, Steinbeck, Linda Hogan, Bill Bryson, and Imelda Martín-Junquera. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 page of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 202 - 08 Playing & Writing the Blues - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135
CRN: 22484 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber This course examines a body of literary texts in the framework of a discipline other than literary or English studies per se--e.g., the physical or social sciences, religion/theology, history, the other arts. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 202 - 09 Playing & Writing the Blues - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212
CRN: 21849 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber This course examines a body of literary texts in the framework of a discipline other than literary or English studies per se--e.g., the physical or social sciences, religion/theology, history, the other arts. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 01 Monsters, Inc. M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920
CRN: 22464 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Heather M. McNiel Monsters are a big business: from Disney’s cute, cuddly monsters to nightmarish versions of zombies, vampires, and giant lizards, huge franchises have been built around monsters and the terror or fascination they inspire in us. Our obsession with monster stories and their adaptations may seem to be a recent phenomenon, but history is full of examples of monster stories that have been reinterpreted and reformulated for new purposes and audiences. This course will examine some of the most influential literary works featuring monsters, and trace how they were adapted and reinterpreted for various artistic and commercial purposes, often using different genres or formats. Texts may include FRANKENSTEIN, DRACULA, BEOWULF, as well as films and other media. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 02 The Southern Gothic Tradition M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040
CRN: 22465 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Liz A. Rolfsmeier Mystery, eccentricity, violence, the supernatural. We will study writers of the American south, focusing on those of the Southern Gothic tradition, such as William Faulkner, Flannery O’Connor, Tennessee Williams, and Carson McCullers. We will discuss characteristics associated with this tradition--the idea of the “grotesque,” the use of folklore and myth--and discuss how writers used these to explore ideas about race, poverty, faith, tradition, and family relationships. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 03 Virtues of Faith, Hope, & Love M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040
CRN: 22466 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joan M. Williams With its focus on thematic and intertextual perspectives, the readings in this course might be ordered any number of ways: according to theme, an idea that develops across genres or literary periods, or by their incorporation of specific oral or textual precedents (e.g. mythology, the Bible, classical writings, legends, or folklore). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 04 Desperate Housewives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212
CRN: 21823 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild As the popular TV show DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES wrapped up its final season, and as the REAL HOUSEWIVES franchise stakes its claim on more and more locations, the housewife phenomenon provokes some significant questions about where housewives fit into our "post-feminist world." Is a housewife a symbol of social status, privilege, and perfection? Do women still aspire towards that domestic ideal? Is it realistic or obtainable? How do current notions of "housewife" tally with our perception of motherhood, marriage, and social conventions? And what makes housewives desperate? This course seeks to examine some of literature's "desperate housewives" (complicated female characters in domestic settings) and asks why they respond to their circumstances in the manner they do. We will explore why so many literary depictions of housewives portray them as profoundly troubled by boredom, isolation, infidelity, and emptiness. Possible texts may include Henrik Ibsen's A DOLL HOUSE, Betty Friedan's THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE, Virginia Woolf's MRS. DALLOWAY, and Jon Robin Baitz's OTHER DESERT CITIES. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 05 Desperate Housewives M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 21853 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild As the popular TV show DESPERATE HOUSEWIVES wrapped up its final season, and as the REAL HOUSEWIVES franchise stakes its claim on more and more locations, the housewife phenomenon provokes some significant questions about where housewives fit into our "post-feminist world." Is a housewife a symbol of social status, privilege, and perfection? Do women still aspire towards that domestic ideal? Is it realistic or obtainable? How do current notions of "housewife" tally with our perception of motherhood, marriage, and social conventions? And what makes housewives desperate? This course seeks to examine some of literature's "desperate housewives" (complicated female characters in domestic settings) and asks why they respond to their circumstances in the manner they do. We will explore why so many literary depictions of housewives portray them as profoundly troubled by boredom, isolation, infidelity, and emptiness. Possible texts may include Henrik Ibsen's A DOLL HOUSE, Betty Friedan's THE FEMININE MYSTIQUE, Virginia Woolf's MRS. DALLOWAY, and Jon Robin Baitz's OTHER DESERT CITIES. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 06 Midwestern Writers/Landscape M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200
CRN: 22468 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kathleen M. Heinlen This course will wind through the contours of the Midwest landscape--the hills, the valleys, the rivers, the creeks, the cities and the prairies--to reveal who we are. We will look at the domestic safety of the Midwest and the writers it spawned--Cather, Fitzgerald, Sandburg, Wilder, and Keillor--and ask whether the writer and landscape produce people who are the real source of American values. In addition, we also will compare the literature that we read to Midwestern visual art by examining such artists as Wanda Gag, Grant Wood, and Thomas Hart Benton. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 07 Brothers and Keepers M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 227
CRN: 22469 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeannie L. Hofmeister Pride, jealousy, anger, power and control. Rivals yet friends. This course will explore the unique relationships between brothers and close male friends. How do they respond during times of crisis? Is the eldest always the best leader? How do brothers/male friends respond to emotional suffering? How do men communicate their deep love and respect for each other? Possible texts may include: DEATH COMES FOR THE ARCHBISHOP by Willa Cather, THE SUN ALSO RISES by Ernest Hemingway, A RIVER RUNS THROUGH IT by Norman McClean, ORDINARY GRACE by William Kent Krueger, THE BURGESS BOYS by Elizabeth Strout, and DRUM TAPS by Walt Whitman. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 08 Noir in Film and Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320
CRN: 22470 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course explores the genre of noir in both film and literature beginning chronologically in post-World War II America. Historical context includes veterans returning from WWII (often the “heroes” of film noir), women’s changing roles after WWII (the femme fatale and early feminism), the Cold War, McCarthyism, and blacklisting in Hollywood. This background will provide a basis for the inspiration and success of film noir with American audiences. Texts used early in the course are often those adapted into film (James M. Cain’s DOUBLE INDEMNITY and Raymond Chandler’s THE BIG SLEEP). Emphasis in film is placed on the visual techniques used to create the mood/tone of film noir--its gritty subculture. As filmmakers fled Germany and Austria in the 1930s to work in Hollywood, techniques from German expressionist film helped to visually convey feelings of alienation, obsession, and instability fundamental to the genre (for example, Fritz Lang’s THE BIG HEAT, Billy Wilder’s DOUBLE INDEMNITY, and Otto Preminger’s LAURA). The second half of the course will focus on the genre of noir in postmodern literature and film. Cinematic examples of “retro-noir” (CHINATOWN, L.A. CONFIDENTIAL, and DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS) are studied in conjunction with examples of “neo-noir” (MEMENTO, MULLHOLLAND DRIVE, FARGO, and KISS KISS BANG BANG). Contemporary literary examples of neo-noir, such Jonathan Lethem’s GUN WITH OCCASIONAL MUSIC, Janet Fitch’s "THE METHOD," and Naomi Hirahara's "NUMBER 15" are analyzed to see how noir returns in a a twenty-first century, multicultural lens. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 09 New Orleans: River & Its City - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940
CRN: 22471 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brian W. Greening Situated at the mouth of the Mississippi River, New Orleans has a certain romantic, provocative charm--one that pulls at natives and visitors alike. More so now than in the past, New Orleans is defined by spectacle and excess, both of which are part and parcel of the city's primary industry of tourism. Drawn in by dazzling events like Mardi Gras, the alluring architecture of the French Quarter and the promise of debauchery, tourists rarely bother uncovering the Crescent City's rich history. This class will remedy that oversight. Using the literature of Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, and John Kennedy O'Toole, as well as various social and environmental histories, we will explore pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans in all its complexities. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 10 Oral Tradition: Homer-Hip Hop - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940
CRN: 22472 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Katharine F. Rauk Why do we tell stories? And how is listening to a narrative different than reading it on the page? According to poet Patrick Rosal, “Hearing…happens by the vibration of a drum, a hammer, a stirrup, and an anvil in the ear, which causes the cilia to vibrate too, sending them along a nerve to the brain.” This means that all sound, such as poetry or music, is physical: it “literally moves us.” In this class we will explore the intersection of storytelling, poetry, and music, from pre-literate cultures all the way up to the Digital Age. Possible topics include creation myths, Homer’s THE ODYSSEY, SIR GAWAIN AND THE GREEN KNIGHTt, fairy tales, the blues, and Adam Bradley’s THE POETICS OF HIP HOP, among others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 11 (Im)Perfect Worlds - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940
CRN: 22473 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn With its focus on thematic and intertextual perspectives, the readings in this course might be ordered any number of ways: according to theme, an idea that develops across genres or literary periods, or by their incorporation of specific oral or textual precedents (e.g. mythology, the Bible, classical writings, legends, or folklore). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 12 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135
CRN: 22474 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Christopher J. Hassel With its focus on thematic and intertextual perspectives, the readings in this course might be ordered any number of ways: according to theme, an idea that develops across genres or literary periods, or by their incorporation of specific oral or textual precedents (e.g. mythology, the Bible, classical writings, legends, or folklore). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 13 American Idealism:Upward Bound - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135
CRN: 22475 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger As a nation and as individuals, we rely on stories of ascension to prove that those willing and able to learn, work hard, and create something worthy can rise in our society. Yet these tales which in one sense work to show fairness in our system and provide inspiration and hope simultaneously complicate and contest these ideals. Accounts of individuals who beat the odds in their moves "up" inherently reveal that there are odds to beat. At the same time, individual efforts are sometimes bound to collective yearnings and struggles. In this course, we explore tensions and contradictions embedded in these narratives, paying attention to how they affect us individually and the work they do in our society. We'll examine stories (nonfiction, novels, poems, and songs) of individual or collective ascension – or attempted and perhaps failed ascension. Texts may include parts of Benjamin Franklin's autobiography; Thoreau's "CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE"; Francisco Jimenez’s chronicle of his and his family’s lives as (initially) undocumented migrant workers from his early childhood through his undergraduate years; and Edwidge Danticat's BROTHER I'M DYING. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 14 Reading Eating - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 212
CRN: 22483 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paula F. Cisewski With its focus on thematic and intertextual perspectives, the readings in this course might be ordered any number of ways: according to theme, an idea that develops across genres or literary periods, or by their incorporation of specific oral or textual precedents (e.g. mythology, the Bible, classical writings, legends, or folklore). The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 15 Behind Bars:Voices from Prison - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510
CRN: 22476 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Barbara D. Foster Tribble Incarceration seldom appears at the forefront of public concern—despite the millions of Americans behind bars. State-of-the-art forensics and brilliant investigative techniques on Criminal Minds, CSI, and other “crime” shows help convince the public that those arrested must be guilty, but how realistic are these portrayals? This course uses prison literature to show the invisible world of criminal justice. Through memoirs, letters, poems, essays, and autobiographies, the incarcerated and social analysts bear witness to religious, racial, social, and political oppression and to disparities of punishment in America. Some of the writers include Leonard Peltier, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day, Etheridge Knight, Michelle Alexander, Michael G. Santos, and Doris Lessing. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 16 Play Ball: Baseball in Lit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510
CRN: 22477 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Michael Raimondi Bernard Malamud once wrote that "The whole history of baseball has the quality of mythology." This course will examine a variety of writings about our baseball heroes, the men and women who played the game that we call "our national pastime." We'll also look at our country's romanticism with baseball and how writers who wrote about baseball helped give the sport its mythological dimensions. Selections will include essays, short stories, and poetry by authors who loved the game. Likely titles to be read include Jim Bouton's BALL FOUR, Elinor Nauen's DIAMONDS ARE A GIRL'S BEST FRIEND: WOMEN WRITERS ON BASEBALL, Brooke Horvath's LINE DRIVES: 100 CONTEMPORARY BASEBALL POEMS, and WILLIE'S BOYS: THE 1948 BIRMINGHAM BLACK BARONS, THE LAST NEGRO LEAGUE WORLD SERIES AND THE MAKING OF A BASEBALL LEGEND. Please note that this class will have a service learning component. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 17 Exquisite Art of Idleness - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212
CRN: 22478 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Charles A. Conley In this class we will consider “the exquisite art of idleness,” which Oscar Wilde explained was “one of the most important things that any University can teach.” Idleness stands opposed to the distractions of busy-ness: as Gertrude Stein said, “It takes a lot of time to be a genius. You have to sit around so much, doing nothing, really doing nothing.” Through the lens of such texts as Twain’s ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, Thoreau’s WALDEN, Woolf’s A ROOM OF ONE'S OWN, and Teju Cole’s OPEN CITY, we will examine what idleness is or means, whether it is a worthy end in itself or what greater end it might facilitate, and how it fits into our lives vs. how it ought to. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 203 - 51 Living in America (ESL) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200
CRN: 21858 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li Home plays a significant role in our lives. What does "home" mean to you? Is it a geographical location (the country and city you were born in and/or live in)? Is it an emotional bond with family members and other people like yourself? Is it a sense of shelter, comfort, safety, and being welcome when you move to a new place? When one is born in a country but moves to another, where is one's home? In this course, we will explore the many ways American writers have represented their senses of home and senses of being homeless in a variety of literary works--novels, short stories, plays, and memoirs. We will investigate through our readings and discussions what it means to live in America, whether as a citizen, an immigrant, or an international. We will consider how our senses of home are often bound up with issues such as memory, hope, loss, regionalism, alienation, and globalization. Authors to be read will include Ernest Hemingway, Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, Alice Walker, Eva Hoffman, and more. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 (ESL). Please note that this section is only open to English as a Second Language students.

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ENGL 203 - 52 Living in America (ESL) M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440
CRN: 21859 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li Home plays a significant role in our lives. What does "home" mean to you? Is it a geographical location (the country and city you were born in and/or live in)? Is it an emotional bond with family members and other people like yourself? Is it a sense of shelter, comfort, safety, and being welcome when you move to a new place? When one is born in a country but moves to another, where is one's home? In this course, we will explore the many ways American writers have represented their senses of home and senses of being homeless in a variety of literary works--novels, short stories, plays, and memoirs. We will investigate through our readings and discussions what it means to live in America, whether as a citizen, an immigrant, or an international. We will consider how our senses of home are often bound up with issues such as memory, hope, loss, regionalism, alienation, and globalization. Authors to be read will include Ernest Hemingway, Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, Alice Walker, Eva Hoffman, and more. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 121 (ESL). Please note that this section is only open to English as a Second Language students.

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ENGL 204 - 01 Literacy in Contemporary Amer M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 301
CRN: 22479 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Social media, texting, and instant messaging: these are all examples of 21st-century technology that is changing the way we read and write. Instead of declaring the death of the book, we will consider how print and digital literacy converge in a participatory culture that produces creative work, encourages collaboration, and shapes the flow of information. Our approach to what constitutes a "text" will be flexible and may include blogging, texting, media boards, videomaking, podcasting, wikis, etc. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 204 - 02 Literacy in Contemporary Amer M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 301
CRN: 22480 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Social media, texting, and instant messaging: these are all examples of 21st-century technology that is changing the way we read and write. Instead of declaring the death of the book, we will consider how print and digital literacy converge in a participatory culture that produces creative work, encourages collaboration, and shapes the flow of information. Our approach to what constitutes a "text" will be flexible and may include blogging, texting, media boards, videomaking, podcasting, wikis, etc. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 204 - 03 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 212
CRN: 21824 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variation of African-Americans, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine power negotiations involved in these variations. We will likely read Joe Goodwin's MORE MAN THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 204 - 04 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212
CRN: 21860 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variation of African-Americans, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine power negotiations involved in these variations. We will likely read Joe Goodwin's MORE MAN THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 204 - 05 Wordplay: Literary Nonsense - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940
CRN: 22481 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bethany F. Timmerman At the heart of any text is the blindingly obvious; it’s made up of words. While some authors’ vocabulary challenges us to reach for the dictionary, others create their own words altogether. Some words have since been accepted into everyday speech (and even made it into the dictionary), some seem oddly familiar, but obviously fabricated, and others are outright alien. In this course, we’ll explore how literary nonsense, language play, and constructed languages are used by authors in various contexts to entertain, confuse, and create an immersive literary experience. In doing so, we’ll study how syntax, phonetics and context helps us to decipher otherwise undecipherable words, how nonsense/constructed words function within the sentence and the larger text and what these exercises tell us about our relationship to language and literature. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 204 - 06 Literature of Migration - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915
CRN: 22482 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alan J. Grostephan In “Reflections in Exile” Edward Said writes that “Most people are principally aware of one culture, one setting, one home; exiles are aware of at least two, and this plurality of vision gives rise to an awareness of simultaneous dimensions, and awareness that—to borrow a phrase from music—is contrapuntal.” In other words, one’s life is doubled into two separate melodies, one exists in between them in a sort of split consciousness, attempting to transcend this estrangement. While exile may be painful to experience in real life, it has led to great literature, and we might even argue that the act of creating alternative realities in fiction is already a form of doubling or exile. Taking into account the Twin Cities as a place populated by immigrants, we’ll examine subjects related to race, culture, nationalism, alienation, solitude in a variety of works, likely including NOWHERE MAN by Aleksandar Hemon, AMERICANAH by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, MONKEY BRIDGE by Lan Cao, THE EMIGRANTS by W.G. Sebald, PALE FIRE by Vladimir Nabokov, THIS IS HOW YOU LOSE HER by Junot Díaz, and poetry by Mahmoud Darwish, Czeslaw Milosz, Natalie Diaz, among others. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

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ENGL 214 - 01 American Authors I M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510
CRN: 20638 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber The study of significant American authors from the beginnings of American literature to the turn of the twentieth century. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has arisen. Possible authors studied include Hawthorne, Douglass, Jacobs, Fuller, Dickinson, Clemens, Jewett, Cooper, Wheatley, Whitman, and Native American voices. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 214 - 02 American Authors I - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135
CRN: 21839 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelli A. Larson The study of significant American authors from the beginnings of American literature to the turn of the twentieth century. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has arisen. Possible authors studied include Hawthorne, Douglass, Jacobs, Fuller, Dickinson, Clemens, Jewett, Cooper, Wheatley, Whitman, and Native American voices. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 218 - 01 Lit by Women:Critical Hist M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440
CRN: 20416 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild This course will focus on the history of literature by women. It will concentrate on the traditions in Britain and America, but also will include some attention to non-Western women writers. It will address issues of canon formation, as well as the role of gender in the composition and reading of literary texts. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 221 - 01 The Modern Tradition M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040
CRN: 20103 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips This course will focus on representative texts of Western literature in translation from the seventeenth century through the present, including some attention to the interactions of the European traditions with modern African, Latin American or Asian literatures. Authors may include Racine, Goethe, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Sand, and Achebe. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 255 - 01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700
CRN: 21090 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students' critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 255 - 02 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510
CRN: 21091 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students' critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 297 - 01 Emerald Isle: Writing Ireland - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510
CRN: 21838 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Thomas D. Redshaw, Tom Jeffers The subject matter of these courses will vary from year to year, but will not duplicate existing courses. Descriptions of these courses are available in the Searchable Class Schedule on Murphy Online, or the English Department website.

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ENGL 298 - 01 Topics: Intro to Screenwriting - - - R - - - 1800 - 2115
CRN: 21832 4 Credit Hours Instructor: James T. Snapko The purpose of this course is to explore how to write effective narrative screenplays, with an emphasis on the creation of short scripts. In order to explore and identify basic dramatic principles of story, character, and structure, we will analyze numerous short scripts and films made from them. We’ll also look at how the dramatic principles of short scripts have been expanded and turned into feature screenplays by exploring the work of such successful writers and filmmakers as Raymond Chandler (DOUBLE INDEMNITY), Joel & Ethan Coen (FARGO), Nora Ephron (WHEN HARRY MET SALLY), and Akira Kurosawa (RASHOMAN), to name just a few. Once we establish the basics of effective screenplays, students will apply these concepts to the development of their own original short scripts. By the end of the semester, students will have written several complete short scripts that are ready to be shot on their own, produced as part of UST’s filmmaking course, or could be developed further into feature length screenplays. This course satisfies a writing requirement for English and English with Writing Emphasis madoes and counts as a production/practice course for student pursuing the Film Studies minor; please note that it does not count towards the literature and writing core requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 300 - 01 Theory& Practice of Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301
CRN: 20104 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski Working from a base of contemporary rhetorical theory, advanced writing students will write essays in a variety of forms. They will be encouraged to develop a vocabulary for talking about writing, as well as the ability to critique their own and others' work. Directed reading in contemporary writing pedagogy for the elementary and secondary composition teacher. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204; advanced writing skills

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ENGL 304 - 01 Analytical/Persuasive Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301
CRN: 21383 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Intended for the experienced writer this course will emphasize the theory and practice of writing in analytical, persuasive and research-based rhetorical modes as preparation for advanced or professional writing in a variety of disciplines. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. --

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ENGL 321 - 01 Writing Poetry - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510
CRN: 21229 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of poetry writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. Open to students with some previous experience in writing poetry. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

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ENGL 325 - 01 Tpc:Writers Grappling with God M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200
CRN: 21835 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Erika C. Scheurer, Shirley E. Jordon This course will offer an intensive focus on a body of literature defined by its association with a special genre, locale, or theme. Such specialized topics as the epic poem, contemporary autobiography, Minnesota literature, or Genesis in literature might be studied. Students will also consider relevant critical approaches and issues. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 337 - 01 Native Amer Lit & Environment M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320
CRN: 21836 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Offered with specific subtitles, this course provides an intensive focus on a selected body of literature concerning one of the following aspects of human diversity: race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexual orientation. Students will also consider relevant critical approaches and concepts. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 361 - 01 Shakespeare & Early Modern - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135
CRN: 22133 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William J. Junker This course offers an intensive focus on the literature and culture of the English early modern period. Such authors as Sidney, Spenser, Elizabeth I and Cary will provide a context for reading Shakespeare's works. Critical approaches and issues will also be studied. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 365 - 01 Romantic Age in Britain - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510
CRN: 21841 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Young-ok An This course offers an intensive focus on the literature and culture of the Romantic Age in Britain. Such authors as Austen, Blake, Wollstonecraft, Byron, and the Shelleys will be studied, along with critical approaches and issues relevant to the period. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 380 - 01 Issues in English Studies M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040
CRN: 20105 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li This course focuses on ideas and practices central to advanced work in the field of language and literature. In addition to refining students' facility with critical concepts and scholarly methodology, this course will explore a number of key questions for current work in the discipline: How do we define such concepts as literacy, literature, and interpretation? How do we understand the relationship between reader, writer, and text? How do such factors as gender, culture, and history affect our understanding of literature and of ourselves as writers and readers? Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204; at least two courses in ENGL at or beyond ENGL 211

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ENGL 390 - 61 Literary Figure: James Baldwin M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510
CRN: 21833 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David T. Lawrence The late Amiri Baraka, in his 1987 eulogy for James Baldwin, claimed that the writer had “traveled the earth like its history and its biographer,” and “made us better, made us consciously human or perhaps more acidly pre human.” Baraka, who had once viciously attacked Baldwin because of his queer identity, had grown to revere him as one of the most insightful and honest cultural critics of the 20th century. This course will approach Baldwin in this way, not just as a major figure of American literature, but as a visionary and screaming prophet. We will explore Baldwin the paradox, Baldwin the exile, Baldwin the critic, Baldwin the racial philosopher, and Baldwin the clear-eyed American-ologist. In confronting the joy, pain, violence, horror, and truth of works such as GIOVANNI'S ROOM, BLUES FOR MR. CHARLIE, THE FIRE NEXT TIME, NOBODY KNOWS MY NAME, ANOTHER COUNTRY, and others, we will survey the muddy cultural terrain of late 20th century America as Baldwin saw it, one that we all remain mired in and perhaps still do not understand, guided by an artist whose sole conviction was to be simply “an honest man and a good writer.” This course satisfies the multicultural literature requirement for English majors.

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ENGL 405 - 01 Advanced Creative Writing M - - - - - - 1800 - 2115
CRN: 21074 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller This advanced course focuses on the student's development of a substantial body of work in a chosen genre: poetry, fiction, or creative nonfiction. Students will review their previous writing, do further exploration of a chosen genre, and produce significant new work in that genre. Readings will include theoretical and creative texts. Prerequisite: ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or permission of instructor based on examination of a portfolio

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ENGL 422 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum II - - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227
CRN: 20564 2 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill Part II of the sequence of two, two-credit courses, ENGL 421 and 422, includes readings from The Art of Literary Editing, active involvement with other editors in the selection process, learning and applying principles of literary copyediting, using desktop publishing to produce the new edition of Summit Avenue Review, and learning Web design to create and revise pages on the Summit Avenue Review Web site. Completion of the two-semester sequence fulfills the second-level Computer Competency requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisite: ENGL 421

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ENGL 481 - 01 Sem: Rewriting Virginia Woolf M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700
CRN: 20106 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will read key works by English novelist and essayist Virginia Woolf alongside contemporary reactions to her work by writers Alice Walker, Ian McEwan, and Michael Cunningham; film-makers Sally Potter and Stephen Daldry; as well as contemporary visual artists and composers. Prerequisite: Completion of five English courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 380; or, for non-majors, permission of the instructor and the department chair.

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