Summer 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 01 Monsters Unleashed M T W R - - - 1015 - 1215 OEC 210
CRN: 30316 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gordon D. Grice This course examines the literary roots of iconic monsters like vampires, werewolves, invisible creatures, gigantic animals, mad scientists, mummies, and zombies. We'll read the earliest appearances of these monsters as innovative writers unleash them from folklore and science into horrifying fiction. We'll also try to understand the many meanings they've acquired in Western culture. Authors may include Alexis Tolstoy, J. Sheridan LeFanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Mary E. Wilkins. Frequent writing and discussion. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - - R - - - 1730 - 2130 OEC 210
CRN: 30317 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Anne E. Roth-Reinhardt “The green light at the end of Daisy’s dock.” Wilson and the history cycle. “So it goes.” Morrison and re-memory. The moderns. The Beats. And countless stories of war and the trauma of surviving it. These are a few of the ideas and perspectives offered through the literature of the 20th and 21st centuries—years of volatility and change. Our course will study the American literary experience from 1900 to the present. By reading and analyzing the literature of Faulkner, Hemingway, Stein, O’Connor, Baldwin, and Morrison, among others, we will explore the ever-changing landscape of American literature and consider its influence upon the social and political fabric of the nation. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - 01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 311
CRN: 41197 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucas B. Pingel Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210
CRN: 41198 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William T. Braun Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 305
CRN: 41199 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brett E. Jenkins Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 208
CRN: 41200 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Vadim B. Rubinchik Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 05 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 210
CRN: 41203 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Laura Zebuhr Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 118
CRN: 41204 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paula F. Cisewski Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 07 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 201
CRN: 41205 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 305
CRN: 41206 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brett E. Jenkins Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 09 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 118
CRN: 41207 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paula F. Cisewski Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 10 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 207
CRN: 41208 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 11 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 210
CRN: 41209 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William T. Braun Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 12 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 246
CRN: 41210 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alan J. Grostephan Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 13 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 306
CRN: 41211 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Susan J. Callaway Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 14 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212
CRN: 41212 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Salvatore Pane Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 15 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 227
CRN: 41213 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeannie L. Hofmeister Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 16 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 222
CRN: 41214 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bethany F. Timmerman Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 246
CRN: 41215 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alan J. Grostephan Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 18 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 227
CRN: 41216 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeannie L. Hofmeister Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 19 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 222
CRN: 41223 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bethany F. Timmerman Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 20 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 310
CRN: 41217 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 21 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 212
CRN: 41218 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Charles A. Conley Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 22 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212
CRN: 41219 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Charles A. Conley Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 23 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210
CRN: 41220 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Barbara D. Foster Tribble Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 24 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 305
CRN: 41222 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Timothy J. Dewey Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 25 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 208
CRN: 41246 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 26 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 311
CRN: 41228 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bethany L. Fletcher Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 27 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OSS 122
CRN: 41225 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 28 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 305
CRN: 41226 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Timothy J. Dewey Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 29 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 212
CRN: 41224 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Christopher Santiago Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 30 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 208
CRN: 42717 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 31 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 208
CRN: 41229 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Laurie E. Lindeen Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 32 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 210
CRN: 41230 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 33 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 207
CRN: 41388 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Rachel E. MacDonald Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 34 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212
CRN: 41244 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 35 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212
CRN: 41245 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 36 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210
CRN: 41202 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Terri L. Topness Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 51 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 481
CRN: 41227 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Staff Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 52 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 481
CRN: 41427 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Staff Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 01 Too Graphic?: Graphic Novel M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 310
CRN: 41772 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn Graphic novels have a deep capacity to inform their readers beyond the written text while utilizing inferences from the visual aspect they use in their form to foster a critical understanding in conjunction with the text. We will explore both the written and visual aspects while also developing an understanding of how the genre of the graphic novel began and the prevalence of its genre today. Readings may include: Will Eisner's MINOR MIRACLES, Bob Dylan's BOB DYLAN REVISTED: FEATURING 13 ILLUSTRATED SONGS, Art Spiegelman's MAUS, Marjane Satrapi's PERSEPOLIS, and Homer's THE ODYSSEY. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 02 American Memoir: 1990-Present - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 209
CRN: 43089 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Laurie E. Lindeen The genre of memoir exploded on the literary scene in the 1990s, for better or worse. This course will closely examine the genre of the American memoir and the memoirs that define the times. We will read memoirs by James Frey, John D’Agota, Mary Karr, and Cheryl Strayed, along with supplemental essays challenging, supporting, and critiquing these works. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 03 American Memoir: 1990-Present - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 201
CRN: 42691 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Laurie E. Lindeen The genre of memoir exploded on the literary scene in the 1990s, for better or worse. This course will closely examine the genre of the American memoir and the memoirs that define the times. We will read memoirs by James Frey, John D’Agota, Mary Karr, and Cheryl Strayed, along with supplemental essays challenging, supporting, and critiquing these works. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 04 Passports: Poetry Around World - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 309
CRN: 42692 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mary E. Frandson Get ready to stamp your passport! In 107 days (the approximate length of the semester) this course explores and excavates the historical, political, social and revolutionary events and cultures from around the world channeled through poetic voices throughout the century. As Williams Carlos Williams once said, “The act of writing is to reveal,” and poetic examination at its best, reveals the complex lives and the rich cultures of people from around the world including the Middle East, Asia, Palestine, Lebanon, Europe and North and South America. Focus given to learning to closely read poetic text will not only demonstrate how poetry functions like a machine of words, but from selected text emerges a most vital opportunity for today's scholar looking to deepen their understanding of the human condition and heighten their awareness to the lives of others, as each poem offers a new perspective world view. This course also offers experimentation with various forms of poetry, in order to identify, strengthen and empower one's own creative voice on the page in that everyone may see how necessary it is to offer that voice, their own story, a contribution, a gift, to the universal verse. Students will closely read a handful of poetic text including: LANGUAGE FOR A NEW CENTURY: CONTEMPORARY POETRY FROM THE MIDDLE EAST, ASIA AND BEYOND, WE BEING HERE: POEMS FOR PALESTINE AND LEBANON, and THE NEW EUROPEAN POETS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 05 Spiritual Writing of 21st Cent - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 201
CRN: 42693 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Michael Raimondi In the introduction to a recent collection of spiritual writing, Billy Collins, former U.S. Poet Laureate, writes: "I came to sense that a spiritual realm could be accessed, not through the recommended roads of religion leading to portals guarded by priests, rabbis, imams, and religious leaders of other stripes, but instead directly through their actual daily experience." In this class, we will read works from a variety of faith traditions, using selections from either the Best Spiritual Writing series published yearly by Penguin Books or works from the Best American Spiritual Writing series put out annually by Mariner Books. Our goal will be to examine works by 21st-century authors who explore the mysteries of the soul and the soul's relationship with the universe, as well as how these works reflect the spiritual discipline of the writers. Note: this course may include a service learning component. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 01 Existential America M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 308
CRN: 41861 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Alexander Maksik's YOU DESERVE NOTHING, Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Jon Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, Flannery O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, James Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Nella Larsen's QUICKSAND, and Horace McCoy's THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY? In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 02 Existential America M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 308
CRN: 42695 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Alexander Maksik's YOU DESERVE NOTHING, Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Jon Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, Flannery O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, James Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Nella Larsen's QUICKSAND, and Horace McCoy's THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY? In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 03 The Play's the Thing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210
CRN: 42441 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Amy M. Muse "The play's the thing," Hamlet declares, "wherein I'll catch the conscience of the king." He knows that a theatrical production can prick his uncle's guilty conscience and reveal the truth of his murderous actions. In this course we will read dramatic literature, engage in performance exercises, and work with theatre artists to illuminate psychological questions about human consciousness and connection, intimacy, identity formation, and psychopathology. Course texts will include research in psychology and theatre theory alongside plays such as BETRAYAL, DEAD MAN’S CELL PHONE, SIX CHARACTERS IN SEARCH OF AN AUTHOR, HEDDA GABLER, and EQUUS. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 04 Literature Inspired by Science - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301
CRN: 42444 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller Writers have long looked to the sciences for fresh metaphors, innovative structures, and conceptual models. In this course we will read fiction, poetry, and drama inspired by the sciences and explore how writers build on scientific models and methods to bring new vision to ideas about space, time, matter, and being. Possible texts may include Ann Patchett's STATE OF WONDER, Mary Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN, Shakespeare's THE TEMPEST, and a selection of poetry such as Albert Goldbarth, Pattiann Rogers, Ruth Padel, Walt Whitman, and Adrienne Rich. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 05 Ways of Seeing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 202
CRN: 42445 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will explore the rich intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from a critical framework of readings about the visual, we will apply certain key terms and concepts--from ekphrasis to punctum--to graphic novels, photo-essays, and stories and novels about visual artists. As a class, we will practice close-reading both images and literary texts, collaboratively developing a set of analytical strategies and practices along the way. This course will also involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 06 Irish Catholicism:Faith/Doubt M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 311
CRN: 43097 4 Credit Hours Instructor: James S. Rogers This course will examine literature from a variety of genres that are informed by the distinctive experience of Irish Catholicism. Though some attention would be paid to nineteenth-century backgrounds, most of the works read would be twentieth-century or contemporary literature. Joyce’s PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN is important, certainly, but so are works by Kate O’Brien, Edna O’Brien, and such contemporary authors as Seamus Heaney, Colm Toibin, or Colum McCann. There are also numerous opportunities to consider filmic representations, e.g., DOUBT or THE MAGDALEN SISTERS. Two unavoidable themes in any examination of Irish Catholicism are, a) authoritarianism, and b) the role of religion in the public sphere—both highly contemporary concerns. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 01 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 212
CRN: 41774 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Christopher J. Hassel How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Dr. Gregory Benford’s THE MARTIAN RACE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 02 In the Beginning: Genesis Lit M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 306
CRN: 42446 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild The Biblical book of Genesis has offered to every age stories that touch on the most basic questions of human life. Giving readers a vision of the creation of the world, examining the origins of evil, tracing the beginnings of family life and the disruptions possible within it, Genesis is an inexhaustible source of foundational myths and beliefs. It is not surprising, then, that, from one generation to the next, writers have drawn upon Genesis for their inspiration. This course will study the book of Genesis in a literary context, exploring some of the works that issue from it. Along with Robert Alter's translation of Genesis, we will read C. S. Lewis's PERELANDRA, local author Rebecca Kanner's SINNERS AND THE SEA: THE UNTOLD STORY OF NOAH'S WIFE, and Yasmina Reza's GODS OF CARNAGE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 03 Your Utopia & My Dystopia M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 227
CRN: 42581 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera What¹s your idea of a perfect world? How would it be different from your friends¹ ideas? Some of our greatest stories have taken up our dreams of utopia and imagined the way competing needs and desires distort those dreams, producing a dystopian reality. In this class, we will discuss literary and cinematic work that revolves around notions of power and the way societies get shaped to privilege power even when the goal is to create a living situation that is equitable to everyone. Sometimes dystopias result from attempts to hoard power; sometimes they result from efforts to create utopias. Is it possible that utopias are never as good as intended? Maybe, as Thomas More¹s UTOPIA suggests, they don't really exist at all except as ideals in the mind of people with power. Possible texts include THE HUNGER GAMES by Suzanne Collins; BATTLE ROYALE: THE NOVEL by Koushon Takami; NEVER LET ME GO by Kazuo Ishiguro; V FOR VENDETTA by Alan Moore and David Lloyd; THE WATER KNIFE by Paolo Bacigalupi; PARABLE OF THE SOWER by Octavia Butler; HUM by Jamaal May; and the films BLADE RUNNER and V FOR VENDETTA. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 04 Order Up: Literature of Food M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 232
CRN: 42696 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course will explore food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition, as well as a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. We'll first query our assumptions about how food is grown, raised, and prepared and ask what is "organic," what is "junk," what is "gourmet," and who decides? Who has access to "good food" in our country? What and where are "food deserts"? From an intertextual perspective, this course will include a community activism component involving food shelves and community gardens, as well as the screening of at least two films (perhaps THE BIG NIGHT and the film adaptation of Joanne Harris' CHOCOLAT), guest lecturers, an opportunity to write and prepare a "food memory/recipe," and a final collective meal. Possible texts for this course may include Chitra Divakaruni's THE MISTRESS OF SPICES, Laura Esquivel's LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, Lois-Ann Yamanaka's WILD MEAT AND THE BULLY BURGERS, Ruth Ozeki's MY YEAR OF MEATS, and Monica Ali's IN THE KITCHEN. We'll also likely read nonfiction accounts of food by famous American writers such as Herman Melville on clam chowder and Ralph Ellison on baked yams from the wonderful collection, AMERICAN FOOD WRITING. The texts, along with issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan, Meridel Le Sueur, and Vandana Shiva, to accounts of Julia Childs' connection to cuisine and espionage, to famous French chef Auguste Escoffier's connection to food and war, and to contemporary accusations of "food pornography" and "gluttony" leveled at the Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 05 Final Frontier: Mars & Beyond M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212
CRN: 42697 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Christopher J. Hassel How do global politics influence our desire to explore space? How does space exploration impact our theological viewpoints of the universe? What roles might nation-states and corporations play in future space endeavors? Focusing on the human yearning to explore space, as well as current efforts to put humans on Mars in the near future, this class will attempt to answer these questions by examining a variety of literary forms including fiction, science fiction, poetry, nonfiction prose, and biography. Likely works to be studied include Tracy K. Smith’s LIFE ON MARS, Mary Doria Russell’s THE SPARROW, and Dr. Gregory Benford’s THE MARTIAN RACE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 06 Literary Villains & Bad Guys M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 115
CRN: 43092 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones In most cultures, readers tend to identify with heroes and hope that their goodness will triumph over the evil antagonist. However, every now and then, readers find the villain of the text far more appealing than its hero or heroine – the villain could be more intriguing than a hero, feature more human, relatable characteristics, could provide a reader with an opportunity to live vicariously through them, or a number of other reasons. Throughout the semester, we’ll read texts that future both classic and contemporary texts that are well-known for their villains, such as Iago (William Shakespeare’s OTHELLO), Tom Ripley (Patricia Highsmith’s THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY), Brigid O’Shaugnessy (Dashiell Hammett’s THE MALTESE FALCON), and Anton Chigurh (Cormac McCarthy’s NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN), examine the cultural context for each text and villain, and analyze what it is about these characters that makes readers want to root for them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 07 Order Up: Literature of Food M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 232
CRN: 42698 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course will explore food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition, as well as a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. We'll first query our assumptions about how food is grown, raised, and prepared and ask what is "organic," what is "junk," what is "gourmet," and who decides? Who has access to "good food" in our country? What and where are "food deserts"? From an intertextual perspective, this course will include a community activism component involving food shelves and community gardens, as well as the screening of at least two films (perhaps THE BIG NIGHT and the film adaptation of Joanne Harris' CHOCOLAT), guest lecturers, an opportunity to write and prepare a "food memory/recipe," and a final collective meal. Possible texts for this course may include Chitra Divakaruni's THE MISTRESS OF SPICES, Laura Esquivel's LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, Lois-Ann Yamanaka's WILD MEAT AND THE BULLY BURGERS, Ruth Ozeki's MY YEAR OF MEATS, and Monica Ali's IN THE KITCHEN. We'll also likely read nonfiction accounts of food by famous American writers such as Herman Melville on clam chowder and Ralph Ellison on baked yams from the wonderful collection, AMERICAN FOOD WRITING. The texts, along with issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan, Meridel Le Sueur, and Vandana Shiva, to accounts of Julia Childs' connection to cuisine and espionage, to famous French chef Auguste Escoffier's connection to food and war, and to contemporary accusations of "food pornography" and "gluttony" leveled at the Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 08 In the Beginning: Genesis Lit M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 306
CRN: 42447 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild The Biblical book of Genesis has offered to every age stories that touch on the most basic questions of human life. Giving readers a vision of the creation of the world, examining the origins of evil, tracing the beginnings of family life and the disruptions possible within it, Genesis is an inexhaustible source of foundational myths and beliefs. It is not surprising, then, that, from one generation to the next, writers have drawn upon Genesis for their inspiration. This course will study the book of Genesis in a literary context, exploring some of the works that issue from it. Along with Robert Alter's translation of Genesis, we will read C. S. Lewis's PERELANDRA, local author Rebecca Kanner's SINNERS AND THE SEA: THE UNTOLD STORY OF NOAH'S WIFE, and Yasmina Reza's GODS OF CARNAGE. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 09 Literary Villains & Bad Guys M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210
CRN: 42699 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones In most cultures, readers tend to identify with heroes and hope that their goodness will triumph over the evil antagonist. However, every now and then, readers find the villain of the text far more appealing than its hero or heroine – the villain could be more intriguing than a hero, feature more human, relatable characteristics, could provide a reader with an opportunity to live vicariously through them, or a number of other reasons. Throughout the semester, we’ll read texts that future both classic and contemporary texts that are well-known for their villains, such as Iago (William Shakespeare’s OTHELLO), Tom Ripley (Patricia Highsmith’s THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY), Brigid O’Shaugnessy (Dashiell Hammett’s THE MALTESE FALCON), and Anton Chigurh (Cormac McCarthy’s NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN), examine the cultural context for each text and villain, and analyze what it is about these characters that makes readers want to root for them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 10 Literary Villains & Bad Guys M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 210
CRN: 42700 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones In most cultures, readers tend to identify with heroes and hope that their goodness will triumph over the evil antagonist. However, every now and then, readers find the villain of the text far more appealing than its hero or heroine – the villain could be more intriguing than a hero, feature more human, relatable characteristics, could provide a reader with an opportunity to live vicariously through them, or a number of other reasons. Throughout the semester, we’ll read texts that future both classic and contemporary texts that are well-known for their villains, such as Iago (William Shakespeare’s OTHELLO), Tom Ripley (Patricia Highsmith’s THE TALENTED MR. RIPLEY), Brigid O’Shaugnessy (Dashiell Hammett’s THE MALTESE FALCON), and Anton Chigurh (Cormac McCarthy’s NO COUNTRY FOR OLD MEN), examine the cultural context for each text and villain, and analyze what it is about these characters that makes readers want to root for them. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 11 Global Revolutions in Lit M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 305
CRN: 42701 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa J. Hendrickx The Center for Strategic and International Studies has labeled seven "revolutions" that will most profoundly shape our world in the next century: Population, Resource Management, Technology, Information, Economics, Security, and Governance. This class will explore literature that illustrates these revolutions. Course readings will have either a global or futuristic focus and will include novels, short stories, and current journalism articles. In addition to discussing how people will experience these revolutions, we will maintain a semester long focus on where the humanities fit into an increasingly scientific and technological world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 12 Global Revolutions in Lit M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 305
CRN: 42702 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa J. Hendrickx The Center for Strategic and International Studies has labeled seven "revolutions" that will most profoundly shape our world in the next century: Population, Resource Management, Technology, Information, Economics, Security, and Governance. This class will explore literature that illustrates these revolutions. Course readings will have either a global or futuristic focus and will include novels, short stories, and current journalism articles. In addition to discussing how people will experience these revolutions, we will maintain a semester long focus on where the humanities fit into an increasingly scientific and technological world. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 13 Fairy Tales: Then and Now - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 210
CRN: 42703 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shandi L. Wagner While today we are most familiar with Disney’s feature-length animated fairy-tale films, there is a long and varied literary fairy-tale tradition that extends all the way back to ancient Egypt. Originally intended for adults, the idea that fairy tales are written largely (or only) for children is a relatively recent development, and one that ignores the majority of the history of the fairy tale. While fairy tales are currently experiencing a cultural resurgence in the form of fairy-tale films (MALEFICENT and HANSEL AND GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS, for example) and television series (such as GRIMM and ONCE UPON A TIME), fairy tales have been embedded within our culture all along, influencing our beliefs and actions. Through our reading and discussion of the course texts, we will explore the fairy tale in its many incarnations across time, place, and even language. We will try to delineate the characteristics of the fairy tale as a literary genre and how cultural changes have (or have not) transformed the way fairy tales are written and/or their function in society. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 14 Saints and Miracles - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 309
CRN: 42704 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mary E. Frandson This course is a study of the stories of saints through a variety of genres such as historical fiction, poetry, prayer, the language of novenas, memoir, and autobiography. At the forefront of our contextual explorations, we'll examine how saints teach us how to live in any walk of life or set of circumstances, how they persevere in the face of adversity, and how they have the strength to deal with discouragement. Selected texts will examine the religious journeys of saints, explore their mystical experiences and personal philosophies, and question their humanism within the constructs of their culture and time. As author Molly Wolf writes, "Saints have shown us that there is the possibility of living Godwardly in this life, however imperfectly we do it." The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 15 Shades of Harlem in Contemp US - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 212
CRN: 42705 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brian W. Greening In 2008, the people of the United States elected Barack Obama President. In the aftermath of Obama’s victory, with our first black president ensconced in the White House, several pundits asserted that we are now living in a “post-racial era” in America. Though appealing, this flowery “post-racial” sentiment glosses over a complex history of American race relations following Reconstruction. In an effort to extend (rather than put an end to) the American discourse on race, this class will attend to the questions of how, where, and when race has and still matters in the United States. We will revisit several works of fiction and non-fiction from the Harlem Renaissance, including classic texts like Jean Toomer’s CANE, James Weldon Johnson’s THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF AN EX-COLORED MAN, and Zora Neale Hurston’s MULES AND MEN. We’ll also reach forward, incorporating more contemporary poets, playwrights, novelists, and cultural critics, including but not limited to Octavia Butler, Toni Morrison, Henry Dumas and Doris Betts. Finally, we will use W.E.B. DuBois’ s seminal text, SOULS OF BLACK FOLK, as a primary source for the work we will do throughout the semester. Students should be prepared to compose a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 16 Rough Beasts: Animals - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 311
CRN: 42707 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gordon D. Grice Sometimes a lion stands for something, sometimes it’s just a lion, and sometimes it eats you. This course will examine the literary uses writers have made of non-human animals—as subject matter, as symbol, and as mirror of human nature. We’ll read fiction, nonfiction, and poetry illustrating a broad array of beliefs and approaches. Authors may include May Swenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Roger Waters. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 17 Rough Beasts: Animals - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 OEC 210
CRN: 42709 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gordon D. Grice Sometimes a lion stands for something, sometimes it’s just a lion, and sometimes it eats you. This course will examine the literary uses writers have made of non-human animals—as subject matter, as symbol, and as mirror of human nature. We’ll read fiction, nonfiction, and poetry illustrating a broad array of beliefs and approaches. Authors may include May Swenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Roger Waters. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 41 HONORS:Your Utopia/My Dystopia M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 227
CRN: 42579 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera What¹s your idea of a perfect world? How would it be different from your friends¹ ideas? Some of our greatest stories have taken up our dreams of utopia and imagined the way competing needs and desires distort those dreams, producing a dystopian reality. In this class, we will discuss literary and cinematic work that revolves around notions of power and the way societies get shaped to privilege power even when the goal is to create a living situation that is equitable to everyone. Sometimes dystopias result from attempts to hoard power; sometimes they result from efforts to create utopias. Is it possible that utopias are never as good as intended? Maybe, as Thomas More¹s UTOPIA suggests, they don't really exist at all except as ideals in the mind of people with power. Possible texts include THE HUNGER GAMES by Suzanne Collins; BATTLE ROYALE: THE NOVEL by Koushon Takami; NEVER LET ME GO by Kazuo Ishiguro; V FOR VENDETTA by Alan Moore and David Lloyd; THE WATER KNIFE by Paolo Bacigalupi; PARABLE OF THE SOWER by Octavia Butler; HUM by Jamaal May; and the films BLADE RUNNER and V FOR VENDETTA. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 42 HONORS:Your Utopia/My Dystopia M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 42580 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David T. Lawrence What¹s your idea of a perfect world? How would it be different from your friends¹ ideas? Some of our greatest stories have taken up our dreams of utopia and imagined the way competing needs and desires distort those dreams, producing a dystopian reality. In this class, we will discuss literary and cinematic work that revolves around notions of power and the way societies get shaped to privilege power even when the goal is to create a living situation that is equitable to everyone. Sometimes dystopias result from attempts to hoard power; sometimes they result from efforts to create utopias. Is it possible that utopias are never as good as intended? Maybe, as Thomas More¹s UTOPIA suggests, they don't really exist at all except as ideals in the mind of people with power. Possible texts include THE HUNGER GAMES by Suzanne Collins; BATTLE ROYALE: THE NOVEL by Koushon Takami; NEVER LET ME GO by Kazuo Ishiguro; V FOR VENDETTA by Alan Moore and David Lloyd; THE WATER KNIFE by Paolo Bacigalupi; PARABLE OF THE SOWER by Octavia Butler; HUM by Jamaal May; and the films BLADE RUNNER and V FOR VENDETTA. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 51 Exploring Amer Lit/Cult (ESL) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 208
CRN: 41793 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Staff This course is reserved for English as a Second Language (ESL) students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - 01 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 204
CRN: 42449 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variation of African-Americans, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine power negotiations involved in these variations. We will likely read Joe Goodwin's MORE MAN THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - 02 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 204
CRN: 42450 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variation of African-Americans, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine power negotiations involved in these variations. We will likely read Joe Goodwin's MORE MAN THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 211 - 01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301
CRN: 42040 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of British authors from the medieval period through the eighteenth century. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts by such authors as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Behn, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 414
CRN: 40640 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber The study of significant American authors from the turn of the century to the present. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has been formed. Possible authors studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Morrison, Cather, Wharton, Rich, and O'Neill. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 217 - 01 20th C. African-American Lit M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 308
CRN: 40449 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David T. Lawrence This course will be a survey of African American literature in the 20th Century with a focus on major aesthetic currents and movements such as realism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, and the Black Arts Movement. Authors will include: Pauline Hopkins, W.E.B. DuBois, Marcus Garvey, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Margaret Walker, Robert Hayden, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Larry Neal, Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, and others. This course satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement and the English Diversity distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 220 - 01 The Classical Tradition - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MCH 106
CRN: 42046 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Raymond N. MacKenzie This course will focus on representative texts of Western literature in translation, from the origins of Greek literature through Early Modern Europe. Authors may include Homer, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, and Marie de France. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 255 - 01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 205
CRN: 41250 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Salvatore Pane This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students' critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. Please note that this class is pending approval to count as a literature and writing core course for students who started their core with ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 255 - 02 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 307
CRN: 42430 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Heather M. Bouwman This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students' critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. Please note that this class is pending approval to count as a literature and writing core course for students who started their core with ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 255 - 03 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 481
CRN: 41251 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Christopher Santiago This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students' critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. Please note that this class is pending approval to count as a literature and writing core course for students who started their core with ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 280 - 01 Intro to English Studies M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301
CRN: 42427 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren English 280, the gateway course into the English major and the minor, is an introduction to (a) literary tools, techniques, and terminology for reading and writing in English studies; (b) the history of English Studies as a discipline and the intellectual concepts and critical debates that have shaped the field; and (c) the practices of English Studies, from close reading and analysis of literary and critical texts to interpretation and scholarly research. Students are strongly advised to take this course the semester immediately following the declaration of their English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 300 - 01 Thry/Prac. Writng (Peer Cons.) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OSS 122
CRN: 40112 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Susan J. Callaway Working from a base of contemporary rhetorical theory, advanced writing students will write essays in a variety of forms. They will be encouraged to develop a vocabulary for talking about writing, as well as the ability to critique their own and others' work. Directed reading in contemporary writing pedagogy for the elementary and secondary composition teacher. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204; advanced writing skills

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ENGL 305 - 01 Linguistics: English Lang M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 305
CRN: 40113 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li The study of the historical, structural, and semantic features of the English language; systems of English grammar. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 322 - 01 Writing Fiction M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481
CRN: 40114 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Matthew C. Batt This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of fiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

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ENGL 323 - 01 Writing Creative Nonfiction - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 314
CRN: 42432 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of creative nonfiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor

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ENGL 337 - 01 Literature & Social Change - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 227
CRN: 41781 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury The last fifty years have seen some dramatic changes in social, economic, and political systems across the world. Many of these changes have come about because of the concerted struggles of ordinary people to create a more just society. This class will highlight texts from these years—texts that have reflected moments of great social transformation, and texts that have served as catalysts for such social change. Concentrating on works from Colombia to India, from Palestine to the United States, we will consider the many connections between the word and the world. The course will focus specifically on the following struggles: the struggle against colonialism and racism; the struggle for sexual and gender equality; the struggle for citizenship rights; and the struggle against environmental degradation. We will end the course by paying attention to some recent movements for social change: the Arab Spring, Occupy Wall Street, and Black Lives Matter. Texts will include Tsitsi Dangarembga’s NERVOUS CONDITIONS, Frantz Fanon’s THE WRETCHED OF THE EARTH, Gabriel García Márquez’s, ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF SOLITUDE, Oscar Martinez’s THE BEAST, and Vandana Shiva's EARTH DEMOCRACY. This course satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement and the Diversity distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 367 - 01 20th-Cent. British Lit & Arts - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 BEC LL15
CRN: 42428 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James Make it New: Twentieth-Century British Literature and Other Arts. This course surveys twentieth-century literary experiments alongside innovations in painting, music, dance, film, and other arts. Our readings and materials will allow us to consider how writers and artists navigated the century's historical and cultural upheavals (including industrialism, women's suffrage, empire, war, and civil rights) and worked to redefine Britain's national and cultural identities along the way. Key writers may include Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith. This course satisfies the British Literature distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 371 - 01 Freedom in 19th-Cent. Amer Lit M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 232
CRN: 42429 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Laura Zebuhr This course traces the 19th-century development of a concept that is very intimately tied to commonplace narratives about the United States: freedom. We will investigate philosophical, political, and aesthetic debates about what freedom means and who should have it, as well as what kinds of things can constrain us or limit our freedom. We will look at how 19th-century American literary texts theorize and try to represent the lived experience of and struggle for freedom. We will put these literary portrayals in conversation with social and political contexts like slavery and emancipation, Indian Removal, immigration, and industrialization. Authors studied may include Frederick Douglass, Herman Melville, Kate Chopin, and Jack London. This course satisfies both the Early Literature and American Literature distribution requirements for English majors. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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ENGL 421 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum I M - - - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227
CRN: 40547 2 Credit Hours Instructor: Matthew C. Batt In ENGL 421 and 422, a sequence of two, two-credit courses, participants will study the history and character of literary magazines from 1912 to the present; learn desktop publishing, book and Web design, and editorial procedures; and apply this knowledge to producing the university's literary and visual arts magazine, Summit Avenue Review. Activities during the fall semester, part I of the sequence, include readings from The Little Magazine: A History and Bibliography and The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History; examining the design and content of fifteen professional literary magazines; learning InDesign CS5 desktop publishing program; providing design and layout for the COMPAS Arts Education Program anthology; creating preliminary Summit Avenue Review page designs; working collaboratively with other literary magazine editors to develop selection procedures and principles; and writing a comparison essay on two professional literary magazines. Prerequisite: previous or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or instructor permission

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ENGL 490 - 21 Resrch: Hemingway Bibliography - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 313
CRN: 40978 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelli A. Larson Interested in research? And the real world of publishing? This course offers a unique opportunity to engage both while studying one of this country's most famous modern authors, Ernest Hemingway. In an age notably short in memory, Hemingway remains a permanent force in American literature and culture. Hundreds of essays, notes, and books appear annually on his life and art. Add the occasional posthumous publication and critical debate rises to a feverish pitch. Scholars turn to the "Annotated Bibliography" of THE HEMINGWAY REVIEW, the premier journal in Hemingway studies, as their only resource for all scholarship appearing on Hemingway worldwide. In this course, we will begin by reading and studying Hemingway's most representative novels and short stories in preparation for our research. Students will work together to prepare two bibliographies, including the most recent "Annotated Bibliography" for the upcoming issue of THE HEMINGWAY REVIEW. Student's names will appear as co-authors on this publication. Instructor approval is necessary to register for this course. Interested students should contact Dr. Kelli Larson prior to Thursday, April 10th to set up an interview. Prerequisite(s): Course limited to four English majors who are of junior or senior standing.

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