Fall 2014 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 110 - P1 Intensive Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 301
CRN: 40115 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Susan J. Callaway The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 110 - P2 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 209
CRN: 40116 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelli A. Larson The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 110 - P3 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 227
CRN: 40117 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Erika C. Scheurer The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 110 - P4 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 227
CRN: 40963 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 01 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 212
CRN: 41307 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paula F. Cisewski Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 02 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 210
CRN: 41309 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucas B. Pingel Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 03 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 209
CRN: 41310 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Vadim B. Rubinchik Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 04 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 JRC 246
CRN: 41311 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brett E. Jenkins Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 06 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 311
CRN: 41313 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Katharine F. Rauk Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 08 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 229
CRN: 41315 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Paula F. Cisewski Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 09 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 108
CRN: 41316 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Christopher J. Hassel Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 10 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 311
CRN: 41317 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William T. Braun Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 11 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 246
CRN: 41318 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brett E. Jenkins Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 12 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 SCB 329
CRN: 41319 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Laurie E. Lindeen Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 13 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 222
CRN: 41320 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Christopher J. Hassel Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 14 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 307
CRN: 41321 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joan M. Williams Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 15 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 227
CRN: 41322 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeannie L. Hofmeister Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 16 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 307
CRN: 41323 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joan M. Williams Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212
CRN: 41324 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 18 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 236
CRN: 41325 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Charles A. Conley Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 19 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 210
CRN: 41326 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alison L. Underthun-Meilahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 20 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 227
CRN: 41327 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Jeannie L. Hofmeister Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 21 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MCH 231
CRN: 41328 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Charles A. Conley Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 22 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 305
CRN: 41335 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 23 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 327
CRN: 41329 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joseph K. Campbell Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 24 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 212
CRN: 41330 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 25 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 JRC 246
CRN: 41331 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Alan J. Grostephan Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 26 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 SCB 329
CRN: 41332 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Joseph K. Campbell Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 27 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 307
CRN: 41333 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mary E. Frandson Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 28 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 MHC 211
CRN: 41334 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa J. Hendrickx Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 29 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 307
CRN: 41367 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Timothy J. Dewey Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 30 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 210
CRN: 41341 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 31 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 203
CRN: 41337 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bethany F. Timmerman Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 33 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 311
CRN: 41339 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nouchie Xiong Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 34 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 307
CRN: 41336 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Timothy J. Dewey Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 35 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 210
CRN: 41342 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 36 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 208
CRN: 41343 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 37 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 203
CRN: 41545 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Melissa J. Hendrickx Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 38 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 222
CRN: 41361 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Bethany F. Timmerman Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 39 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 301
CRN: 41362 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 40 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 208
CRN: 41661 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Yvonne E. Asp-Grahn Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 41 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 307
CRN: 41662 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Terri L. Topness Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 42 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 301
CRN: 41663 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 44 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing - - - - - - - -
CRN: 43255 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Staff Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 51 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MHC 211
CRN: 41340 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li Please note that this section is only open to English as a Second Language (ESL) students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 52 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 MHC 211
CRN: 41594 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li Please note that this section is only open to English as a Second Language (ESL) students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - P1 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 306
CRN: 41314 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 01 Travel: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 227
CRN: 42358 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND-- as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 02 Detective Fiction M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 305
CRN: 42482 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones From the reasoning of Sherlock Holmes to the hard-nosed approach of Sam Spade to the technology used by Rick Deckard, detective fiction has entertained and engaged readers with thrilling action and intricately woven plots. While it may seem that detective fiction is little more than a series of formulaic plot lines with certain types of characters, a closer inspection shows that there's more than meets the (private) eye. Indeed, detective fiction often reflected the changing attitudes western culture had about gender, politics, sexuality, race, class, and nationalism. In this class, we'll examine these changing attitudes during the genre's early age in the mid-1800s (fiction by Poe and Doyle) through the late 1990s (fiction by Auster and Mosely) by examining the culture which serves as a backdrop for detective fiction. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 03 Detective Fiction M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 305
CRN: 42483 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Daniel G. Jones From the reasoning of Sherlock Holmes to the hard-nosed approach of Sam Spade to the technology used by Rick Deckard, detective fiction has entertained and engaged readers with thrilling action and intricately woven plots. While it may seem that detective fiction is little more than a series of formulaic plot lines with certain types of characters, a closer inspection shows that there's more than meets the (private) eye. Indeed, detective fiction often reflected the changing attitudes western culture had about gender, politics, sexuality, race, class, and nationalism. In this class, we'll examine these changing attitudes during the genre's early age in the mid-1800s (fiction by Poe and Doyle) through the late 1990s (fiction by Auster and Mosely) by examining the culture which serves as a backdrop for detective fiction. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 04 Travel: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 212
CRN: 42392 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people that we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 05 Spiritual Writing of 21st Cent - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 246
CRN: 42484 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Michael Raimondi In the introduction to a recent collection of spiritual writing, Billy Collins, former U.S. Poet Laureate, writes: "I came to sense that a spiritual realm could be accessed, not through the recommended roads of religion leading to portals guarded by priests, rabbis, imams, and religious leaders of other stripes, but instead directly through their actual daily experience." In this class, we will read works from a variety of faith traditions, using selections from either the Best Spiritual Writing series published yearly by Penguin Books or works from the Best American Spiritual Writing series put out annually by Mariner Books. Our goal will be to examine works by 21st-century authors who explore the mysteries of the soul and the soul's relationship with the universe, as well as how these works reflect the spiritual discipline of the writers. Note: this course may include a service learning component. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 41 HONORS: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 212
CRN: 42390 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for Aquinas Honors Scholars Program students only.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 42 HONORS: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 227
CRN: 42391 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for Aquinas Honors Scholars Program students only.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 01 Irish-American Literature M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 305
CRN: 42485 4 Credit Hours Instructor: James S. Rogers The defining American experiences of immigration, assimilation, and difference are all part of the Irish-American experience. This course examines those experiences as expressed in literature from a variety of genres. These range from fictionalized representations of immigration (for instance, Jane Urquhart's AWAY), memoirs, novels (such as Alice McDermott's CHARMING BILLY), as well as films, plays, and some contemporary poetry. Many of these texts are award-winning works of literary art--but the raison d'etre of the course is not to exalt the Irish-American experience as unique, but rather, to use it as a starting point for engagement with larger themes. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 02 Visual Literacy - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 211
CRN: 42359 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will explore the rich intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from a critical framework of readings about the visual, we will apply certain key terms and concepts--from ekphrasis to punctum--to graphic novels, photo-essays, and stories and novels about visual artists. As a class, we will practice close-reading both images and literary texts, collaboratively developing a set of analytical strategies and practices along the way. This course will also involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 202 - 03 Visual Literacy - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 211
CRN: 42389 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James In this course, we will explore the rich intersections between image and text across the twentieth century. Working from a critical framework of readings about the visual, we will apply certain key terms and concepts-- from ekphrasis to punctum--to graphic novels, photo-essays, and stories and novels about visual artists. As a class, we will practice close-reading both images and literary texts, collaboratively developing a set of analytical strategies and practices along the way. The course will also involve visits to local museums, galleries, and exhibits. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 01 Lit of the American West M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 307
CRN: 42360 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Liz A. Rolfsmeier In this class, we will explore literature of the American West (and examine popular notions about the "Old West") by studying historical personal narratives, fiction, folklore, poetry, and film. We will discuss ideas about landscape, myth-making, notions of the hero, justice, family, and gender. Possible authors studied may include Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Larry McMurtry, Elmore Leonard, Cormac McCarthy, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Charles Portis. Possible films include TRUE GRIT and APPALOOSA. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 02 Lit of the American West M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 307
CRN: 42496 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Liz A. Rolfsmeier In this class, we will explore literature of the American West (and examine popular notions about the "Old West") by studying historical narratives, fiction, folklore, poetry, and film. We will discuss ideas about landscape, myth-making, notions of the hero, justice, family, and gender. Possible authors studied may include: Mark Twain, Willa Cather, Larry McMurtry, Elmore Leonard, Cormac McCarthy, N. Scott Momaday, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Charles Portis. Possible films may include TRUE GRIT and APPALOOSA. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 03 Playing God: Humans & Biotech M - W - F - - 0815 - 0920 OEC 305
CRN: 42495 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Heather M. McNiel As far back as Ancient Greece, literature imagined and explored the possibility of using artificial means to create human (or human-like) bodies. From Hephaistos, the Greek god of artifice and metalworking, who fashioned his servants' bodies out of metal, to contemporary portrayals of cyborgs and clones in film and fiction, the idea that technology could be used to produce, shape, or enhance the human body has elicited both excitement and fear. Drawing on both literary and cinematic portrayals of artificially produced bodies, this class will examine some of the perennial questions surrounding bodies that are produced by such "unnatural" means. Possible texts may include such novels as Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN, Ishiguro's NEVER LET MET GO, Piercy's HE, SHE, AND I and such films as Ridley Scott's BLADE RUNNER and Michael Bay's THE ISLAND. Short stories and essays will also be examined. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 04 Playing God: Humans & Biotech M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 305
CRN: 42494 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Heather M. McNiel As far back as Ancient Greece, literature imagined and explored the possibility of using artificial means to create human (or human-like) bodies. From Hephaistos, the Greek god of artifice and metalworking, who fashioned his servants' bodies out of metal, to contemporary portrayals of cyborgs and clones in film and fiction, the idea that technology could be used to produce, shape, or enhance the human body has elicited both excitement and fear. Drawing on both literary and cinematic portrayals of artificially produced bodies, this class will examine some of the perennial questions surrounding bodies that are produced by such "unnatural" means. Possible texts may include such novels as Shelley's FRANKENSTEIN, Ishiguro's NEVER LET ME GO, Piercy's HE, SHE, AND I and such films as Ridley Scott's BLADE RUNNER and Michael Bay's THE ISLAND. Short stories and essays will also be examined. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 05 Midwestern Writers/Landscapes M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MHC 211
CRN: 42493 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kathleen M. Heinlen This course will wind through the contours of the Midwest landscape--the hills, the valleys, the rivers, the creeks, the cities and the prairies--to reveal who we are. We will look at the domestic safety of the Midwest and the writers it spawned--Cather, Fitzgerald, Sandburg, Wilder, and Keillor--and ask whether the writer and landscape produce people who are the real source of American values. In addition, we also will compare the literature that we read to Midwestern visual art by examining such artists as Wanda Gag, Grant Wood, and Thomas Hart Benton. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 06 20-Something Narratives M - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 OEC 210
CRN: 42486 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips In this course we will examine two strains of the "20-something narrative," exemplified by Fitzgerald's THIS SIDE OF PARADISE and Hemingway's THE SUN ALSO RISES (we'll read both), in which characters in their twenties attempt to navigate their way through the tricky waters of getting on (or not getting on, as the case may be) in the world. The works to be read in this class--all spanking good & life-changing--will divide between the light and the heavy, the sadly funny and the ultra-sad. They will also give you a preview of what heights you might aspire to--and to what depths you might sink. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 07 New Orleans: River & Its City - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 305
CRN: 42492 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Brian W. Greening Situated at the mouth of the Mississippi River, New Orleans has a certain romantic, provocative charm--one that pulls at natives and visitors alike. More so now than in the past, New Orleans is defined by spectacle and excess, both of which are part and parcel of the city's primary industry of tourism. Drawn in by dazzling events like Mardi Gras, the alluring architecture of the French Quarter and the promise of debauchery, tourists rarely bother uncovering the Crescent City's rich history. This class will remedy that oversight. Using the literature of Mark Twain, Kate Chopin, and John Kennedy O'Toole, as well as various social and environmental histories, we will explore pre- and post-Hurricane Katrina New Orleans in all its complexities. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 08 Ringmasters: The Circus in Lit - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 222
CRN: 42491 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This class explores the many facets of performativity, exhibition, and exploitation in the circus through a series of texts told from multiple perspectives: ringmasters, sideshow acts, animal tamers, and acrobats. The course will move back and forth in time, examining Roman circuses and expectations of entertainment in ancient civilizations as well as Victorian circuses, with an emphasis on female acrobats, and perhaps featuring Sleary's Circus from Charles Dickens's HARD TIMES. Also included will be an examination of Toulouse-Lautrec's depictions of the circuses of Moliere and Fernando and the Nouveau Cirque, as well as excerpts from P.T. Barnum's extraordinary autobiography, THE ART OF GETTING MONEY, OR HINTS AND HELPS TO MAKE A FORTUNE. Contemporary carnivals will be studied in the collection, STEP RIGHT UP: STORIES OF CARNIVALS, SIDESHOWS, AND THE CIRCUS, which feature works by Ray Bradbury, Mark Twain, Angela Carter, Flannery O'Connor, and Franz Kafka. Katherine Dunn's GEEK LOVE will be read in its entirety. Cathy Day's THE CIRCUS IN WINTER, Sara Gruen's WATER FOR ELEPHANTS, and Erin Morgenstern's THE NIGHT CIRCUS are also in consideration as secondary novels. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 09 Existential America - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MCH 231
CRN: 42490 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Alexander Maksik's YOU DESERVE NOTHING, Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Jon Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, Flannery O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, James Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Nella Larsen's QUICKSAND, and Horace McCoy's THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY? In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 10 Behind Bars:Voices from Prison - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212
CRN: 42489 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Incarceration seldom appears at the forefront of public concern--despite the millions of Americans behind bars. State-of-the-art forensics and brilliant investigative techniques on CRIMINAL MINDS, CSI, and other "crime" shows help convince the public that those arrested must be guilty, but how realistic are these portrayals? This course uses prison literature to show the invisible world of criminal justice. Through memoirs, letters, poems, essays, and autobiographies, the incarcerated and social analysts bear witness to religious, racial, social, and political oppression and to disparities of punishment in America. Likely authors to be studied include Leonard Peltier, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day, Etheridge Knight, Michelle Alexander, Michal G. Santos, and Doris Lessing. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 11 Ringmasters: The Circus in Lit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 307
CRN: 42488 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course explores the many facets of performativity, exhibition, and exploitation in the circus through a series of texts told from multiple perspectives: ringmasters, sideshow acts, animal tamers, and acrobats. The course will move back and forth in time, examining Roman circuses and expectations of entertainment in ancient civilizations as well as Victorian circuses, with an emphasis on female acrobats, and perhaps featuring Sleary's Circus from Charles Dickens's HARD TIMES. Also included will be an examination of Toulouse-Lautrec's depictions of the circuses of Moliere and Fernando and the Nouveau Cirque, as well as excerpts from P.T. Barnum's extraordinary autobiography, THE ART OF GETTING MONEY, OR HINTS AND HELPS TO MAKE A FORTUNE. Contemporary carnivals will be studied in the collections, STEP RIGHT UP: STORIES OF CARNIVALS, SIDESHOWS, AND THE CIRCUS, which features works by Ray Bradbury, Mark Twain, Angela Carter, Flannery O'Connor, and Franz Kafka. Katherine Dunn's GEEK LOVE will be read in its entirety. Cathy Day's THE CIRCUS IN WINTER, Sara Gruen's WATER FOR ELEPHANTS, and Erin Morgenstern's THE NIGHT CIRCUS are also in consideration as secondary novels. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 12 Existential America - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 305
CRN: 42487 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Doug P. Phillips In this course we will examine a body of work that traffics in such existential themes as freedom and responsibility, authenticity and bad faith, anguish and abandonment, identity and subjectivity, and choice and commitment. While some of our readings will reach beyond our own shores (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus, Kafka, Nietzsche, Dostoevsky, and Kierkegaard), we will mostly focus on works by 20th-century American writers: Alexander Maksik's YOU DESERVE NOTHING, Chuck Palahniuk's FIGHT CLUB, Jon Krakauer's INTO THE WILD, Flannery O'Connor's A GOOD MAN IS HARD TO FIND, James Baldwin's THE FIRE NEXT TIME, Nella Larsen's QUICKSAND, and Horace McCoy's THEY SHOOT HORSES, DON'T THEY? In the words of Zadie Smith, we're going to read a selection of very good books in this course, concentrating on whatever is most particular to them in the hope that this might help us understand whatever is most particular to us. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 13 Crossing the Color Line M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 222
CRN: 43246 4 Credit Hours Instructor: David T. Lawrence Course added to MURPHY on Friday, April 25th. A specific course description will be released in the near future.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 14 Monsters Unleashed - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 305
CRN: 43373 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gordon D. Grice This course examines the literary roots of iconic monsters like vampires, werewolves, invisible creatures, gigantic animals, mad scientists, mummies, and zombies. We'll read the earliest appearances of these monsters as innovative writers unleash them from folklore and science into horrifying fiction. We'll also try to understand the many meanings they've acquired in Western culture. Authors may include Alexis Tolstoy, J. Sheridan LeFanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Mary E. Wilkins. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 15 Monsters Unleashed - T - R - - - 1730 - 1915 OEC 212
CRN: 43371 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Gordon D. Grice This course examines the literary roots of iconic monsters like vampires, werewolves, invisible creatures, gigantic animals, mad scientists, mummies, and zombies. We'll read the earliest appearances of these monsters as innovative writers unleash them from folklore and science into horrifying fiction. We'll also try to understand the many meanings they've acquired in Western culture. Authors may include Alexis Tolstoy, J. Sheridan LeFanu, Robert Louis Stevenson, Rudyard Kipling, and Mary E. Wilkins. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 51 Exploring Amer Lit/Cult (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 210
CRN: 42393 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Suzanne L. Donsky Please note that this section is only open to English as a Second Language (ESL) students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 52 Exploring Amer Lit/Cult (ESL) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 210
CRN: 42394 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Suzanne L. Donsky Please note that this section is only open to English as a Second Language (ESL) students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - 01 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 208
CRN: 42361 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in America. We will read about the language variation of African-Americans, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine power negotiations involved in these variations. We will likely read Joe Goodwin's MORE MAN THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - 02 Race/Gender/Sexuality & Lang. M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210
CRN: 42388 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski We live in a nation of languages--and this diversity of languages represents not a mere array of diversity, but power dynamics, histories of struggle, and warring values amongst different groups in Ameria. We will read about the language variation of African-American, gays, and females in colloquial and literary speech, and examine the power negotiations involved in these variations. Likely books to be read include Joe Goodwin's MORE THAN YOU'LL EVER BE: GAY FOLKLORE AND ACCULTURATION IN MIDDLE AMERICA, Gloria Anzaldua's BORDERLANDS/LA FRONTERA: THE NEW MESTIZA, Deborah Tannen's YOU JUST DON'T UNDERSTAND: WOMEN AND MEN IN CONVERSATION, Alice Walker's "In Search of Our Mother's Gardens," August Wilson's THE PIANO LESSON, poetry by Tillie Olson, Amiri Baraka, Sonia Sanchez, Sarah Jessica Moore, and a local zine by Mike Pudd'nhead titled WAGES SO LOW YOU'LL FREAK. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - 03 Re-Envisioning America - T - R - - - 0800 - 0940 OEC 212
CRN: 42497 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mary E. Frandson From the first conception of a New World to the latest re-envisioning of America, this course will survey a kaleidoscopic view of adapting American literacies through the visual arts, maps, collage and photomontage, letters, cartoons, social networks, hip-hop ballads, film, and the language of campaign speeches and inaugural addresses. We will explore how literary genres grow out of a need for expression of what it means to be an American, and question whether or not there exists a philosophy that shapes an American intellectual identity. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - 04 Re-Envisioning America - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 OEC 212
CRN: 42498 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Mary E. Frandson From the first conception of a New World to the latest re-envisioning of America, this course will survey a kaleidoscopic view of adapting American literacies through the visual arts, maps, collage and photomontage, letters, cartoons, social networks, hip-hop ballads, film, and the language of campaign speeches and inaugural addresses. We will explore how literary genres grow out of a need of expression of what it means to be an American, and question whether or not there exists a philosophy that shapes an American intellectual identity. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 211 - 01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301
CRN: 42928 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of British authors from the medieval period through the eighteenth century. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts by such authors as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Behn, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 324
CRN: 40681 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera The study of significant American authors from the turn of the century to the present. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has been formed. Possible authors studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Morrison, Cather, Wharton, Rich, and O'Neill. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 02 American Authors II M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 OEC 210
CRN: 43254 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Andrew J. Scheiber The study of significant American authors from the turn of the century to the present. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has been formed. Possible authors studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Morrison, Cather, Wharton, Rich, and O'Neill. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 217 - 01 Multicultural Literature M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 222
CRN: 40473 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Elizabeth L. Wilkinson This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of authors drawn from the literature of one of the following: (a) American communities of color; (b) postcolonial peoples; (c) diasporic peoples. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts from at least one such literary tradition, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 220 - 01 The Classical Tradition - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 55S B10
CRN: 42937 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Raymond N. MacKenzie This course will focus on representative texts of Western literature in translation, from the origins of Greek literature through Early Modern Europe. Authors may include Homer, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, Ovid, Dante, and Marie de France. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 222 - 01 Cath Lit Trad/Medieval-Mdrn M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 55S 207
CRN: 43196 4 Credit Hours Instructor: William J. Junker This course surveys literary works with theological or spiritual themes that have contributed to the vitality of Catholic culture. The purpose of the course is to help students realize that Catholic culture has fostered a variety of literary expressions and has produced works that speak compellingly of human experience and sacramental life. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - 01 Intro to Imaginative Writing M - W - - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 481
CRN: 41372 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students' critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. Please note that this creative writing course does not count towards the core literature and writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 255 - 03 Intro to Imaginative Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 210
CRN: 41374 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill This course introduces students to skills necessary for imaginative writing. It includes close readings of literary texts that model basic techniques, weekly writing exercises that encourage exploration and development of craft, and workshop discussions to develop students' critical skills. This course will include instruction in setting, character, voice, point of view, literal and figurative imagery, rhythm and sound patterns, and literary structures. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. Please note that this creative writing class does not count towards the core literature and writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 300 - 01 Thry/Prac. Writng (Peer Cons.) M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MHC 211
CRN: 40119 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Susan J. Callaway This section is reserved for Center for Writing peer consultants. Our next regular section of this course will be offered in Spring 2015.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 305 - 01 Linguistics: English Lang M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 OEC 208
CRN: 40120 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li The study of the historical, structural, and semantic features of the English language; systems of English grammar. Required for secondary licensure in communication arts and literature students. Please note that this course does not count towards the core literature and writing requirement.

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Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 322 - 01 Writing Fiction - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 210
CRN: 40121 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill This intermediate course explores traditional and innovative patterns of fiction writing. Emphasis on experimentation with a variety of techniques and development of individual voice. This course will include critique sessions, readings to broaden possibilities of form and subject, and individual instruction. Prerequisite: ENGL 255 or permission of instructor.

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ENGL 337 - 01 Transnational Human Rights/Lit - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 222
CRN: 42369 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury Since September 11, 2001, "human rights" as an area of activism, knowledge, and practice has been foregrounded by terror, torture, preemptive wars, the large movement of dispossessed migrant and refugee populations, and increasing wealth inequality. In this course, we will discuss the proliferation of rights "discourse" during this period, concentrating on several interrelated topics: economic rights, refugee and immigrant rights, gender rights, and environmental and land rights. As we discuss the political, social, and economic ramifications of transnational ideas of rights, we will explore a variety of cultural texts (primarily film and literature) that construct, disrupt, and negotiate the language/discourse of rights. Although "human rights" as an area of activism, knowledge, and practice has a long history, in this class we will be using the United Nations Declaration of 1948 as a key intellectual and political reference point for our discussions, reading it critically as we analyze texts from cultures across the globe. Micheline Ishay's volume THE HUMAN RIGHTS READER will be our main text, and we will also read writers such as Mourid Barghouti, Aminatta Forna, Indra Sinha, Arundhati Roy, and Vandana Shiva. This course satisfies the Human Diversity core requirement and the Diversity distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 341 - 31 Wmn Writers/Celebrity:Vict Era - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 OEC 212
CRN: 41641 4 Credit Hours Instructor: M. A. Easley The Victorian era produced some of the most important women writers in literary history. Writers such as Charlotte Bronte, George Eliot, Christina Rossetti, and Elizabeth Gaskell broke new ground by creating plots and female characters that transformed understanding of women's experience. Each writer pursued a unique career path, achieving literary celebrity against all the odds. This course will illuminate the diverse ways women worked within Victorian print culture, utilizing the mass media as a vehicle to reach new audiences and achieve lasting fame. This course satisfies the diversity distribution requirement and British distribution requirement for English majors and the Human Diversity core curriculum requirement. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

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ENGL 380 - 01 Issues in English Studies M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 OEC 208
CRN: 40407 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucia Pawlowski This course focuses on ideas and practices central to advanced work in the field of language and literature. In addition to refining students' facility with critical concepts and scholarly methodology, this course will explore a number of key questions for current work in the discipline: How do we define such concepts as literacy, literature, and interpretation? How do we understand the relationship between reader, writer, and text? How do such factors as gender, culture, and history affect our understanding of literature and of ourselves as writers and readers? Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204; at least two courses in ENGL at or beyond ENGL 211

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ENGL 421 - 01 Literary Magazine Practicum I - - W - - - - 1730 - 1915 JRC 227
CRN: 40583 2 Credit Hours Instructor: Nathan P. Hill In ENGL 421 and 422, a sequence of two, two-credit courses, participants will study the history and character of literary magazines from 1912 to the present; learn desktop publishing, book and Web design, and editorial procedures; and apply this knowledge to producing the university's literary and visual arts magazine, Summit Avenue Review. Activities during the fall semester, part I of the sequence, include readings from The Little Magazine: A History and Bibliography and The Little Magazine in America: A Modern Documentary History; examining the design and content of fifteen professional literary magazines; learning InDesign CS5 desktop publishing program; providing design and layout for the COMPAS Arts Education Program anthology; creating preliminary Summit Avenue Review page designs; working collaboratively with other literary magazine editors to develop selection procedures and principles; and writing a comparison essay on two professional literary magazines. Prerequisite: previous or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 321 or 322 or 323 or instructor permission

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ENGL 481 - 01 Sem: English Majors in World M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 481
CRN: 42376 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Amy M. Muse In this senior seminar we will explore the work of English-major types--that is, readers and writers--engaging the world. Our reading will include drama, travel literature, and essays of all kinds, and students will create a portfolio of writing in various genres such as intellectual autobiography, literary criticism, travel essay, cultural analysis, and vocational manifesto. The heart of the seminar is an individualized research and writing project on a topic, question, community, or field of work that students identify as playing an important role in their lives post-graduation, with a goal of using knowledge and skills acquired within the English major to enter the conversation of the next stage of their lives. Prerequisites: Completion of five courses at or beyond ENGL 211, including ENGL 380; or, for non-majors, permission of the instructor and the department chair.

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ENGL 490 - 21 Resrch: Hemingway Bibliography - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 ASC 230
CRN: 41060 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kelli A. Larson Interested in research? And the real world of publishing? This course offers a unique opportunity to engage both while studying one of this country's most famous modern authors, Ernest Hemingway. In an age notably short in memory, Hemingway remains a permanent force in American literature and culture. Hundreds of essays, notes, and books appear annually on his life and art. Add the occasional posthumous publication and critical debate rises to a feverish pitch. Scholars turn to the "Annotated Bibliography" of THE HEMINGWAY REVIEW, the premier journal in Hemingway studies, as their only resource for all scholarship appearing on Hemingway worldwide. In this course, we will begin by reading and studying Hemingway's most representative novels and short stories in preparation for our research. Students will work together to prepare two bibliographies, including the most recent "Annotated Bibliography" for the upcoming issue of THE HEMINGWAY REVIEW. Student's names will appear as co-authors on this publication. Instructor approval is necessary to register for this course. Interested students should contact Dr. Kelli Larson prior to Thursday, April 10th to set up an interview. Prerequisite(s): Course limited to four English majors who are of junior or senior standing.

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