Summer 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 573 - 01 Frankenstein & Beyond: Shelley M - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 30423 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Young-ok An Mary Shelley's novels include pioneering science fiction (FRANKENSTEIN, also known as the "last" gothic novel), historical novels (VALPERGA; PERKIN WARBEK), an apocalyptic novel (THE LAST MAN), and a psychological novella (MATHILDA). All these works also contain autobiographical facets and comments on her luminary contemporaries such as Percy Shelley, Byron, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Rousseau, and Napoleon, to name a few. Considering the tremendous romance with FRANKENSTEIN in contemporary literature and culture (especially the implications of monstrosity, science and ethics, and constructions of the self), the goal of this course is to help students understand the various sub-genres of the novel through reading Shelley's six novels and the period by connecting her works with those by Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Walter Scott, and Jane Austen (the latter two being most famous as novelists of the period). In doing so, students will gain an understanding of how Shelley responded to the emergence of the genre in the 18th century and helped shape the future of the genre. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement. Please note that this is a Summer Session II class that runs from July 13 through August 20, 2015.

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Fall 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 40150 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Young-ok An An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

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GENG 514 - 01 Lyre to Liar: Lyric Element M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42433 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller What do we mean when we call a text “lyric”? Are we praising, damning or merely observing? From its earliest incarnation as a reference to music in poetry, the term “lyric” has travelled widely across genres of art and literature. It can manifest as a description for musical qualities of a text, brevity, subjectivity, motive, or it can indicate privacy, a focus on the intimate, the personal, the confessional. It has registered as a literary cry of pain, a mode of resisting the order of time or narrative sequence. It has even been seen as a dance that tempts is own end. In this course, we’ll read critical and creative texts that examine and exhibit the various incarnations and mutations of the lyric as element and impulse across time and literary genres to find out where lyric as a concept has been, and where it might be going. This course counts as elective credit.

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GENG 558 - 01 Latin American & Latino/a Lit - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42434 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera In our current transnational moment, writers and scholars have sought to interrogate national literary traditions, preferring instead to examine patterns of mutual influence among writers and cultural currents across fluid boundaries. In the Americas, this hemispheric turn allows us to better view the complex and shared histories, language, culture, and traditions among Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos/as. In this class, we will read authors from across various American borders whose concerns help us complicate notions of borders, identity, migration and immigration, and language. Authors and texts may include Jose Martí’s NUESTRA AMERICA, Roberto Bolaño’s 2666, Elena Poniatowska’s MASSACRE IN MEXICO, Francisco Goldman’s THE ORDINARY SEAMAN, Federico Garcia Lorca’s POET IN NEW YORK, Luis Alberto Urrea’s THE HUMMINGBIRD’S DAUGHTER, Julio Cortázar’s HOPSCOTCH, Ana Menendez’s LOVING CHE, Ana Castillo’s The MIXQUIAHUALA LETTERS, Daniel Alarcón’s AT NIGHT WE WALK IN CIRCLES, Sandra Cisneros’s THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET, and Jorge Luis Borges’s DREAMTIGERS. This course satisfies the Multicultural Literature distribution requirement.

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GENG 628 - 01 Criminals/Rogues:18th-C Brit L - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42435 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild The eighteenth century in England has been called the "Age of Reason." While Locke, Newton, Addison, Pope, and Johnson attempted to create order out of chaos, other writers and readers gravitated toward the flip sides of reason--irrationality, madness, and criminality. In this course, we will explore the shadow-side of the Enlightenment, reading Restoration comedies about sexual intrigue; the "secret histories" of disguise and mistaken identity by Eliza Haywood; Daniel Defoe's take on criminal biography in MOLL FLANDERS; and the rollicking drama about rogues and thieves, John Gay's BEGGAR'S OPERA. We will also study the more developed and nuanced studies of social mores and their violation by late-century writers; important portraits of the "outsider" include Elizabeth Inchbald's A SIMPLE STORY and William Godwin's CALEB WILLIAMS. Bakhtin on the canivalesque and Foucault on criminality and the rise of prisons, among other critics and theorists, will help to structure our discussions. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

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J-Term 2016 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location