Spring 2016 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 401

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

22353 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 547 - 01 19th-Century Amer Lit - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21883 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

This course investigates a concept that is very intimately tied to commonplace narratives about the United States: freedom. We will look at how 19th-century texts such as Frederick Douglass' Narrative and Charlotte Perkins Gilman's The Yellow Wallpaper, as well as literary movements like Transcendentalism, Gothic literature, and Naturalism theorize and represent various ideas of what it might mean to be free. Secondary readings that introduce transational debates about freedom and free will in the late 18th and 19th centuries, as well as the political contexts of slavery and emancipation, Indian Removal, immigration, and industrialization will frame our discussions. This course satisfies the pre-1900 American Literature requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 572 - 01 History of English Language M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21884 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Juan Li

Why is the pronoun “she” the word of the millennium? How did English spelling become the “world’s most awesome mess”, as Mario Pei puts it? This course invites you to examine the dramatic and interesting ways in which the English language has changed over the past 1200 years - from a little known dialect spoken on a British Isle to a global language spoken by 500 million people around the world as their native tongue. We will study the stages of the “life” of English, beginning with Old English and continuing through Middle English, Early Modern English and into present-day English. We will consider both internal linguistic changes of the language as well as cultural and literary events that caused changes. In this process of investigating the language’s past, we will also reflect on its present and look ahead to its future. By the end of the term, you will gain proficiency in describing the evolution of the English language. You will also have opportunities to apply your knowledge of the history of English to your own areas of interest - literary historical studies, colonial and post-colonial studies, language studies, and the teaching of writing. No background in linguistics is required for this course. The only prerequisite is your enthusiasm in studying the changes of the English language. This course satisfies an elective credit.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 623 - 01 Lit Figure: John Milton - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21885 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

In this course, our focus will be on Milton’s epic poem, PARADISE LOST, the parallel stories of the fall of Satan and of Adam and Eve. We’ll be reading the poem in the context of Milton’s time, a time of revolution, apocalyptic fears, and enormous social change. And we’ll find additional context in the works of a number of other important writers from the period who also questioned the way things were in religion, politics, and society, and who helped lay the groundwork for the modern world. Among the many topics we’ll discuss are gender roles, the relationship between religion and state, censorship, and the development of the modern conception of the individual self. Among the other authors we’ll be reading are John Donne, George Herbert, Aphra Behn, and Margaret Cavendish. This course satisfies the pre-1800 British literature requirement and counts as a 600-level course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 672 - 01 Ethnographic Writing - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21886 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

David T. Lawrence

In this course we will investigate the difficulties, complexities, limits, and impossibilities of ethnography, exploring questions such as: What are the limits of representation? Is objectivity possible? What are the ethical responsibilities of writing about others? How do we do ethnography without exploiting research “subjects”? Is it possible to do ethnography without exploiting? Should ethnography be done at all? In pursuing these questions we will engage ethnographic theory of the last forty years from the disciplines of anthropology and folklore, focusing on the ethical turn that precipitated a more self-aware, reflexive, and reciprocal ethnography. Theorists will include: James Clifford, George Marcus, Ruth Behar, Deborah Gordon, Clifford Geertz, Kamala Visweswaran, Elaine Lawless, and Talal Asad among others. We will also sample ethnographies of the 20th century – from Malinowski to Alice Goffman – paying close attention as well to experimental fiction, non-fiction, and filmed works by Zora Neale Hurston, Karen McCarthy Brown, Emmanuel Guibert, Maya Deren and others – ultimately posing the questions: what counts as ethnography, and what are the possibilities for it? This course will include an ethnographic writing project. This course satisfies the Multicultural Literature requirement and counts as a 600-level course.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2016 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 559 - 01 Native Amer Literature M - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

30437 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

This course will combine fiction and non-fiction texts that approach the idea of environment and environmental sustainability from a variety of Native American and Indigenous world views. In addition to reading and writing about Native literature, this course will strive to connect students to Native American food and farming and the social-ecological systems in which the stories are embedded. If all goes as planned, we’ll be cooking some indigenous recipes and visiting the Dream of Wild Health Native American farming co-op. Texts that will likely make the reading list include Heid Erdrich’s cookbook Original Local: Indigenous Food, Stories, and Recipes from the Upper Midwest (and we may organize a visit and a cooking class by the author) and Erdrich's collection of poetry National Monuments; Braiding Sweetgrass, a non-fiction text by Robin Wall Kimmerer, a Potawatomi woman and biology professor; the novel Solar Storms by Linda Hogan, a story about four generations of women working to save ancestral land from dam development. One of Leslie Marmon Silko's novels, Ceremony or Almanac of the Dead; and one or more of the following non-fiction texts Winona LaDuke’s All My Relations, David Treuer’s Rez Life, and Vine Deloria, Jr.’s God is Red. We'll also read William Apess’s 1835 essay on the “…Unconstitutional Laws of Massachusetts Relative to the Mashpee Tribe." To contextualize these readings, we'll be learning some of the history of U.S.-Native relations and will discuss essays from a number of the top indigenous scholars at work today. This course satisfies the multicultural distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2016 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40136 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Young-ok An

An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 521 - 01 Medieval Lit in Context M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42436 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

This course will introduce you to the vernacular-language literature of the British Middle Ages–the foundation upon which modern English literature stands. In addition to presenting a number of important medieval authors and works, this course will familiarize you with medieval attitudes toward authorship and textuality, with medieval modes of textual production, transmission and reception, and with specific textual practices relevant to the interpretation of medieval literature. Readings have been chosen as examples of the major literary genres practiced in the Middle Ages, genres such as epic, elegy, lyric, dream vision, romance, Breton lai, autobiography and drama. All readings except materials from the "Canterbury Tales" will be read in modern translations. By the end of the semester, you will be familiar with the significant English-language authors and works of the 8th to 15th centuries and have an understanding of the historical development of vernacular English literature during that period. In all of this, the course will offer, just as the medieval arts themselves were supposed to, the ideal union of “sentence and solas”—instruction and entertainment. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 558 - 01 Fresh Off the Boat: Asian Lit - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

41861 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

The Kung Fu master. The spy. The oversexed dragon lady. The immigrant with the funny accent. Whether it's Hollywood blockbusters or popular fiction, Asian Americans have only recently gotten out from under the invisibility cloak. But even when Asian Americans are part of the picture, they are more often than not forced into bit parts and punchlines, as recently evidenced by Chris Rock’s and Ali G’s “jokes" at the 2016 Oscars, which used children to rehash crude Asian stereotypes about emotionless overachievers and emasculated nerds. This course explores literature and other forms of art created by Asian Americans who tell stories of their own, from Viet Nguyen’s startling debut novel The Sympathizer to Keshni Kashyap’s graphic novel Tina’s Existential Mouth and the Justin Lin-produced YouTube Channel YOMYOMF. We’ll explore the ways that these narratives help us to recover lost American history, such as the WWII internment of Japanese Americans. We’ll explore how spoken word and poetry from Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Hmong communities explode the model minority myth. We’ll also explore ways that Asian American narratives, which are often concerned with the movement of people across and within borders, help us to reframe literature in transnational, translingual, and transcultural terms.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 630 - 01 Victorian Literary Journalism - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

42435 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Over 50,000 periodicals and newspapers were published in Great Britain during the nineteenth century. Most Victorian authors, including Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Wilkie Collins, were prolific journalists. Early in the century, most contributions to the periodical and newspaper press were published anonymously, but by the end of the century the celebrity journalist arose as a major force in Victorian literary culture. In this course, we will investigate this largely uncharted field of discourse - discovering long-forgotten writers and exploring vast new digital archives. In the process, we will engage with cutting-edge theory in the field of nineteenth-century media studies. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 647 - 01 Amer Transcendentalism: Global - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42437 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

While Emerson and Thoreau are often considered quintessential American authors, Emerson actually learned to love nature at a museum in Paris, and Thoreau called himself a yogi. Moreover, Nietzsche read and admired Emerson, and Thoreau's writing has inspired political and social movements around the world. This course studies the work of American Transcendentalists in a transnational and transhistorical context. We look at contemporaneous European philosophers -- Kant, Nietzsche, Swedenborg, Marx, Darwin, etc. -- to help frame the intellectual and literary context for Transcendentalism more broadly. We will then assess scholars' recent claims that these authors anticipate major twentieth-century philosophical movements like existentialism and phenomenology. Finally, we will investigate Transcendentalism's influence on movements such as Civil Rights, Indian Independence, and environmentalism. This course satisfies the pre-1900 American Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)