Spring 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 562 - 01 Modern European Traditions - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 21828 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Raymond N. MacKenzie Reading in translation of representative masterpieces in the European tradition from the Renaissance through the 20th century, including such writers as Cervantes, Racine, Goethe , Flaubert, Sand, Dostoevsky, Kafka, and Mann. Areas of inquiry may also include the mutual interactions of the European tradition with modern African, Latin American, or Eastern literatures.

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GENG 573 - 01 Professional Editing - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 401
CRN: 21829 3 Credit Hours Instructor: M. A. Easley This course will focus on current theories, practices, and conventions of professional editing in the field of English Studies. This will include discussion of broad questions relating to authorship, textuality, and the role of the editor, as well as hands-on practice introducing, annotating, and copyediting literary texts. Students will learn techniques for ensuring consistent, accurate copy, including the use of style sheets and guides. They will also learn how to track and manage editorial projects. The course will include guest lectures from editors in the Twin Cities community as well as practice managing real-world editing assignments. This course counts as elective credit.

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GENG 622 - 01 Shakespeare & Co. in Ren. Thtr M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 OEC 210
CRN: 21830 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Amy M. Muse Though Ben Jonson memorably penned that Shakespeare was “not of an age, but for all time,” he was of an age—the Renaissance—in which theatre was a growth industry and the drama skyrocketed in richness and variation. We will dig into that theatrical world and view Shakespeare alongside contemporaries and competitors such as Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Middleton, John Fletcher, John Webster, Thomas Heywood, and Philip Massinger. What were they obsessed with? Many of the same things we are, which we’ll investigate in two case studies: on threats and prospects of change in marriage (in plays such as THE TAMING OF THE SHREW and its table-turning sequel THE TAMER TAMED, MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING, THE DUCHESS OF MALFI, and A WOMAN KILLED WITH KINDNESS) and threats and prospects of the Islamic world (in such plays as TAMBURLAINE THE GREAT, A CHRISTIAN TURNED TURK, THE RENEGADO, and OTHELLO). We’ll engage in two- and three-dimensional literary criticism (that is, finely-grained study of aesthetics and dramaturgy with much reading aloud and taking of parts) and contextualize our understanding, invoke the presence of the past, through reading historical and political documents. This course satisfies the pre-1800 British Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

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GENG 658 - 01 Transnational Lit: New Economy - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 21831 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury ‪In a 2006 article, “The Location of Literature: The Transnational Book and the Migrant Writer,” Rebecca Wolkowitz suggests that “contemporary literature in the age of globalization is, in many ways, a COMPARATIVE literature: works circulate in many literary systems at once, and can—some would say, need [to]—be read within several national traditions” (my emphasis). In this course, we will consider the validity of this claim, examining a range of texts within the context of some of the vast changes that have taken place in the global economy in the last fifteen years. We will focus on just a few distinctive features of the present conjuncture: 1) the political economy of transnationalism—how the acceleration in transnational capital accumulation and the accompanying dispossession of the poor and rise in migrant and refugee populations (especially in/from the Global South) have been highlighted or displaced in the transnational text; 2) the emergence of a transnational citizen—how questions about citizenship have evolved at a time when national borders have become both more rigid and more fluid; 3) gender in a transnational world—how gender has been used to demarcate and negotiate political and economic conflicts; 4) and finally, the idea of transnational ethics—how the events of 9/11 and the subsequent “war on terror” have realigned our notions of human rights and “universal values.”‬ We will read Judith Butler’s PRECARIOUS LIFE: THE POWERS OF MOURNING AND VIOLENCE, Teju Cole’s novel OPEN CITY, Mohsin Hamid’s novel HOW TO GET FILTHY RICH IN RISING ASIA, Saba Mahmood’s POLITICS OF PIETY: THE ISLAMIC REVIVAL AND THE FEMINIST SUBJECT, Yvonne Adhiambo Owuor’s novel DUST, Caryl Phillips’ novel A DISTANT SHORE, and Indra Sinha’s novel ANIMAL'S PEOPLE, among other texts.‬‬ This course satisfies the Multicultural Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

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Summer 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 573 - 01 Frankenstein & Beyond: Shelley M - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 30423 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Young-ok An Mary Shelley's novels include pioneering science fiction (FRANKENSTEIN, also known as the "last" gothic novel), historical novels (VALPERGA; PERKIN WARBEK), an apocalyptic novel (THE LAST MAN), and a psychological novella (MATHILDA). All these works also contain autobiographical facets and comments on her luminary contemporaries such as Percy Shelley, Byron, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Rousseau, and Napoleon, to name a few. Considering the tremendous romance with FRANKENSTEIN in contemporary literature and culture (especially the implications of monstrosity, science and ethics, and constructions of the self), the goal of this course is to help students understand the various sub-genres of the novel through reading Shelley's six novels and the period by connecting her works with those by Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Walter Scott, and Jane Austen (the latter two being most famous as novelists of the period). In doing so, students will gain an understanding of how Shelley responded to the emergence of the genre in the 18th century and helped shape the future of the genre. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement. Please note that this is a Summer Session II class that runs from July 13 through August 20, 2015.

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Fall 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 40150 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Young-ok An An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

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GENG 514 - 01 Lyre to Liar: Lyric Element M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42433 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Leslie A. Miller What do we mean when we call a text “lyric”? Are we praising, damning or merely observing? From its earliest incarnation as a reference to music in poetry, the term “lyric” has travelled widely across genres of art and literature. It can manifest as a description for musical qualities of a text, brevity, subjectivity, motive, or it can indicate privacy, a focus on the intimate, the personal, the confessional. It has registered as a literary cry of pain, a mode of resisting the order of time or narrative sequence. It has even been seen as a dance that tempts is own end. In this course, we’ll read critical and creative texts that examine and exhibit the various incarnations and mutations of the lyric as element and impulse across time and literary genres to find out where lyric as a concept has been, and where it might be going. This course counts as elective credit.

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GENG 558 - 01 Latin American & Latino/a Lit - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42434 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera In our current transnational moment, writers and scholars have sought to interrogate national literary traditions, preferring instead to examine patterns of mutual influence among writers and cultural currents across fluid boundaries. In the Americas, this hemispheric turn allows us to better view the complex and shared histories, language, culture, and traditions among Latin Americans and U.S. Latinos/as. In this class, we will read authors from across various American borders whose concerns help us complicate notions of borders, identity, migration and immigration, and language. Authors and texts may include Jose Martí’s NUESTRA AMERICA, Roberto Bolaño’s 2666, Elena Poniatowska’s MASSACRE IN MEXICO, Francisco Goldman’s THE ORDINARY SEAMAN, Federico Garcia Lorca’s POET IN NEW YORK, Luis Alberto Urrea’s THE HUMMINGBIRD’S DAUGHTER, Julio Cortázar’s HOPSCOTCH, Ana Menendez’s LOVING CHE, Ana Castillo’s The MIXQUIAHUALA LETTERS, Daniel Alarcón’s AT NIGHT WE WALK IN CIRCLES, Sandra Cisneros’s THE HOUSE ON MANGO STREET, and Jorge Luis Borges’s DREAMTIGERS. This course satisfies the Multicultural Literature distribution requirement.

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GENG 628 - 01 Criminals/Rogues:18th-C Brit L - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42435 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild The eighteenth century in England has been called the "Age of Reason." While Locke, Newton, Addison, Pope, and Johnson attempted to create order out of chaos, other writers and readers gravitated toward the flip sides of reason--irrationality, madness, and criminality. In this course, we will explore the shadow-side of the Enlightenment, reading Restoration comedies about sexual intrigue; the "secret histories" of disguise and mistaken identity by Eliza Haywood; Daniel Defoe's take on criminal biography in MOLL FLANDERS; and the rollicking drama about rogues and thieves, John Gay's BEGGAR'S OPERA. We will also study the more developed and nuanced studies of social mores and their violation by late-century writers; important portraits of the "outsider" include Elizabeth Inchbald's A SIMPLE STORY and William Godwin's CALEB WILLIAMS. Bakhtin on the canivalesque and Foucault on criminality and the rise of prisons, among other critics and theorists, will help to structure our discussions. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

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