Summer 2014 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2014 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism M - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 40157 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.
GENG 529 - 01 The Romantic Age in Britain - - W - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42366 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Young-ok An A study of British poetry, fiction, drama, and non-fiction prose from 1789 to 1850, including exploration of topics such as literary innovation, the Romantic self and imagination, Romantic ecology, the Gothic, the historical novel, and science fiction. Also examined are the relationship between literature and key social developments, such as the French Revolution and Napoleonic Wars, the equality of the sexes, the anti-slave trade movement, industrialization, and the scientific revolution. Authors covered may include Blake, Wollstonecraft, Scott, Wordsworth , Coleridge, Byron, Percy and Mary Shelley, Keats, Austen, and Hemans. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature requirement.
GENG 572 - 01 Amer/Brit Social Protest Novel - T - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 247
CRN: 42367 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Catherine Craft-Fairchild In INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL, Harriet Jacobs writes, "I had heard much about the oppression of the poor in Europe...But when I visited them in their little thatched cottages, I felt that the condition of even the meanest and most ignorant among them was vastly superior to the condition of the most favored slaves in America." In this course, we will closely examine Jacobs's claim, studying fiction and non-fiction of the nineteenth-century in England and the United States that deals with the Industrial Revolution and the plight of both free and enslaved workers. In British Literature, it was common to refer to "slaves of the needle" and "factory slaves," while American slave narratives, like Jacobs's, often contained comparisons between the conditions of poor workers in England and the wholly unpaid workers in America. The two countries were economically interdependent, and their often exploitative factory and agricultural systems reinforced each other. Many writers produced works of social protest intended to change laws or galvanize action to improve condistions for both nations' dispossed peoples. The reading list will include the following: Adam Smith's THE WEALTH OF NATIONS; Charlotte Bronte's SHIRLEY; Elizabeth Gaskell's MARY BARTON and NORTH AND SOUTH; selected writings of Karl Marx and Fredrich Engels; Harriet Beecher Stowe's UNCLE TOM'S CABIN; Harriet Jacobs's INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL; Rebecca Harding Davis's LIFE IN THE IRON MILLS; and Upton Sinclair's THE JUNGLE. This course satisfies the pre-1900 American Literature distribution requirement.
GENG 637 - 01 James Joyce and Company - - - R - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42368 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Emily M. James The writings of Irish writer James Joyce have enchanted, bewildered, and offended readers for over a century. We will begin with the 1914 short story collection DUBLINERS (pausing to celebrate its centennial!) and proceed to the 1922 novel ULYSSES--"a book to which we are all indebted," in the words of fellow modernist T. S. Eliot, "and from which none of us can escape." We will take our time here, exploring the novel's thorny publication history and coupling its episodes with current critical perspectives. Next, we turn to selections of FINNEGANS WAKE (1939) for equal parts amusement and challenge. As the course title promises, our readings will include selections of poetry, fiction, music, and art that either inspired or echoed Joyce's work. Along the way, we will survey Joycean criticism in preparation for the seminar's final essay assignment. The course will likely include a guest speaker and a visit to UST's Celtic Collection. This course counts as a 600-level elective. Prerequisite: GENG 513.

J-Term 2015 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location