Fall 2016 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 OEC 212

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

OEC 212

Course Registration Number:

40136 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Young-ok An

An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 521 - 01 Medieval Lit in Context M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42436 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Martin L. Warren

This course will introduce you to the vernacular-language literature of the British Middle Ages–the foundation upon which modern English literature stands. In addition to presenting a number of important medieval authors and works, this course will familiarize you with medieval attitudes toward authorship and textuality, with medieval modes of textual production, transmission and reception, and with specific textual practices relevant to the interpretation of medieval literature. Readings have been chosen as examples of the major literary genres practiced in the Middle Ages, genres such as epic, elegy, lyric, dream vision, romance, Breton lai, autobiography and drama. All readings except materials from the "Canterbury Tales" will be read in modern translations. By the end of the semester, you will be familiar with the significant English-language authors and works of the 8th to 15th centuries and have an understanding of the historical development of vernacular English literature during that period. In all of this, the course will offer, just as the medieval arts themselves were supposed to, the ideal union of “sentence and solas”—instruction and entertainment. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 558 - 01 Fresh Off the Boat: Asian Lit - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

41861 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

The Kung Fu master. The spy. The oversexed dragon lady. The immigrant with the funny accent. Whether it's Hollywood blockbusters or popular fiction, Asian Americans have only recently gotten out from under the invisibility cloak. But even when Asian Americans are part of the picture, they are more often than not forced into bit parts and punchlines, as recently evidenced by Chris Rock’s and Ali G’s “jokes" at the 2016 Oscars, which used children to rehash crude Asian stereotypes about emotionless overachievers and emasculated nerds. This course explores literature and other forms of art created by Asian Americans who tell stories of their own, from Viet Nguyen’s startling debut novel The Sympathizer to Keshni Kashyap’s graphic novel Tina’s Existential Mouth and the Justin Lin-produced YouTube Channel YOMYOMF. We’ll explore the ways that these narratives help us to recover lost American history, such as the WWII internment of Japanese Americans. We’ll explore how spoken word and poetry from Vietnamese, Cambodian, and Hmong communities explode the model minority myth. We’ll also explore ways that Asian American narratives, which are often concerned with the movement of people across and within borders, help us to reframe literature in transnational, translingual, and transcultural terms.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 630 - 01 Victorian Literary Journalism - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 MHC 211

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

42435 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

Over 50,000 periodicals and newspapers were published in Great Britain during the nineteenth century. Most Victorian authors, including Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Wilkie Collins, were prolific journalists. Early in the century, most contributions to the periodical and newspaper press were published anonymously, but by the end of the century the celebrity journalist arose as a major force in Victorian literary culture. In this course, we will investigate this largely uncharted field of discourse - discovering long-forgotten writers and exploring vast new digital archives. In the process, we will engage with cutting-edge theory in the field of nineteenth-century media studies. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 647 - 01 Amer Transcendentalism: Global - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

42437 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

While Emerson and Thoreau are often considered quintessential American authors, Emerson actually learned to love nature at a museum in Paris, and Thoreau called himself a yogi. Moreover, Nietzsche read and admired Emerson, and Thoreau's writing has inspired political and social movements around the world. This course studies the work of American Transcendentalists in a transnational and transhistorical context. We look at contemporaneous European philosophers -- Kant, Nietzsche, Swedenborg, Marx, Darwin, etc. -- to help frame the intellectual and literary context for Transcendentalism more broadly. We will then assess scholars' recent claims that these authors anticipate major twentieth-century philosophical movements like existentialism and phenomenology. Finally, we will investigate Transcendentalism's influence on movements such as Civil Rights, Indian Independence, and environmentalism. This course satisfies the pre-1900 American Literature distribution requirement. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 507 - 01 Teaching College English - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 401

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

21875 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Lucia Pawlowski

What is English studies for—to appreciate art, develop empathy, construct self or national identity, make social change? Given that, how do we teach it? This seminar will explore the debates and controversies in the research on teaching English at the university level. We will hone in on key terms and threshold concepts in both Composition Studies and Literary Studies (including literacy studies, cultural studies, literary theory, pedagogy, and rhetoric), and translate what we learn in these debates to actual classroom practices that reflect both our evolving pedagogical values, and the current research in English studies pedagogy. Topics include: the colonial history of our discipline, process and post-process theories of writing, critical pedagogy, feminist rhetorics, and translingualism. In their assignments, 507 students will explore and apply concepts to classroom practice. These assignments consist of short written responses to weekly readings, 2-3 longer written pieces synthesizing themes in the seminar, and a longer, written final project. This course is designed to prepare future university professors in English as well as current high school English teachers who teach in the College in the Schools program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 514 - 01 Genre: Literary Nonfiction - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21865 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

While the form of the essay is millennia old, the field of literary or creative nonfiction has barely escaped its infancy. In this study of genre, we will investigate both the roots of the essay as well as the ever-emerging new iterations of the form. We will read widely among contemporary nonfiction writers such as Roxane Gay, Cheryl Strayed, Ta- Nehisi Coates, Dave Eggers, and many others. We will participate in the form as well, by writing both critically and creatively about and in the form of literary nonfiction in sub-genres such as the personal essay, travel writing, nature writing, the ekphrastic essay, immersion journalism, the lyric essay, and even the most contemporary forms such as the podcast and the video essay.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 532 - 01 20th-Century British Lit M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21866 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course surveys twentieth-century literary experiments alongside innovations in painting, music, dance, film, and other arts. We'll consider how writers and artists navigated the century's historical and cultural upheavals (including industrialism, women's suffrage, empire, war, and civil rights) and worked to redefine Britain's national and cultural identities along the way. Key writers may include Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Evelyn Waugh, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 647 - 01 Emily Dickinson in Context - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21867 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Erika C. Scheurer

In this seminar we will focus on the poetry, letters, and life of Emily Dickinson in their cultural context and in the context of contemporary critical theory. Throughout the semester, we will work on close, critical readings of Dickinson's poems and letters. As we do so, we will study topics such as the following: what is currently known of her life, as distinguished from popular myth; 19th-century Amherst and New England history and culture; the publishing history and reception of her work; her female poet contemporaries; different critical approaches to her poems (including feminist, psychological, Marxist, post-structuralist, cultural); and the implications of various poetic, artistic, musical, and dramatic interpretations of her life and work. In addition to preparing a traditional seminar paper for academic audiences, participants will bring Dickinson to the general public by helping to host and prepare displays for the April 2016 marathon reading of all Dickinson’s poems. This course satisfies the pre- 1900 American Literature distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: ENGL 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 658 - 01 Lit in the Age of Human Rights - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21868 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History, Samuel Moyn argues that the discourse of human rights since the 1970s is a specific practice of naming forms of injustice, violence, and servitude. Over the last few decades, the discourse of human rights has arguably become the primary way to categorize conflicts and acts of injustice, often dividing the world into “savages,” saviors, and the saved. In this course, we will examine the language of rights, paying special attention to the ways in which this language has become even more fraught with contradictory expressions since 9/11 and the inauguration of the endless War against Terror. Although we will begin our study with the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights document of 1948 and reflect on famous “rights” texts such as Marx’s The Jewish Question and Hannah Arendt’s “The Decline of the Nation-State and the End of the Rights of Man,” our focus will be on a set of post-9/11 cultural texts, exploring the ways in which these texts play a significant role in negotiating the language of rights, often perpetuating, challenging, or recasting existing ways of understanding acts of injustice. We will read works by a range of writers, including Judith Butler, Edwidge Danticat, Óscar Martínez, Shailja Patel, Indra Sinha, as well as cultural texts such as Sebastião Salgado’s photographs of migrant workers, recent documentary films on the Syrian refugee crisis, and NGO publicity materials related to “building gender literacy and equality” in the Global South. This course satisfies the multicultural distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: ENGL 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)