Spring 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 507 - 01 Teaching College English - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 401

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 401

Course Registration Number:

21875 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Lucia Pawlowski

What is English studies for—to appreciate art, develop empathy, construct self or national identity, make social change? Given that, how do we teach it? This seminar will explore the debates and controversies in the research on teaching English at the university level. We will hone in on key terms and threshold concepts in both Composition Studies and Literary Studies (including literacy studies, cultural studies, literary theory, pedagogy, and rhetoric), and translate what we learn in these debates to actual classroom practices that reflect both our evolving pedagogical values, and the current research in English studies pedagogy. Topics include: the colonial history of our discipline, process and post-process theories of writing, critical pedagogy, feminist rhetorics, and translingualism. In their assignments, 507 students will explore and apply concepts to classroom practice. These assignments consist of short written responses to weekly readings, 2-3 longer written pieces synthesizing themes in the seminar, and a longer, written final project. This course is designed to prepare future university professors in English as well as current high school English teachers who teach in the College in the Schools program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 514 - 01 Genre: Literary Nonfiction - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21865 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Matthew C. Batt

While the form of the essay is millennia old, the field of literary or creative nonfiction has barely escaped its infancy. In this study of genre, we will investigate both the roots of the essay as well as the ever-emerging new iterations of the form. We will read widely among contemporary nonfiction writers such as Roxane Gay, Cheryl Strayed, Ta- Nehisi Coates, Dave Eggers, and many others. We will participate in the form as well, by writing both critically and creatively about and in the form of literary nonfiction in sub-genres such as the personal essay, travel writing, nature writing, the ekphrastic essay, immersion journalism, the lyric essay, and even the most contemporary forms such as the podcast and the video essay.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 532 - 01 20th-Century British Lit M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21866 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Emily M. James

This course surveys twentieth-century literary experiments alongside innovations in painting, music, dance, film, and other arts. We'll consider how writers and artists navigated the century's historical and cultural upheavals (including industrialism, women's suffrage, empire, war, and civil rights) and worked to redefine Britain's national and cultural identities along the way. Key writers may include Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Evelyn Waugh, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 647 - 01 Emily Dickinson in Context - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21867 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Erika C. Scheurer

In this seminar we will focus on the poetry, letters, and life of Emily Dickinson in their cultural context and in the context of contemporary critical theory. Throughout the semester, we will work on close, critical readings of Dickinson's poems and letters. As we do so, we will study topics such as the following: what is currently known of her life, as distinguished from popular myth; 19th-century Amherst and New England history and culture; the publishing history and reception of her work; her female poet contemporaries; different critical approaches to her poems (including feminist, psychological, Marxist, post-structuralist, cultural); and the implications of various poetic, artistic, musical, and dramatic interpretations of her life and work. In addition to preparing a traditional seminar paper for academic audiences, participants will bring Dickinson to the general public by helping to host and prepare displays for the April 2016 marathon reading of all Dickinson’s poems. This course satisfies the pre- 1900 American Literature distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: ENGL 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 658 - 01 Lit in the Age of Human Rights - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

JRC 481

Course Registration Number:

21868 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Kanishka Chowdhury

In The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History, Samuel Moyn argues that the discourse of human rights since the 1970s is a specific practice of naming forms of injustice, violence, and servitude. Over the last few decades, the discourse of human rights has arguably become the primary way to categorize conflicts and acts of injustice, often dividing the world into “savages,” saviors, and the saved. In this course, we will examine the language of rights, paying special attention to the ways in which this language has become even more fraught with contradictory expressions since 9/11 and the inauguration of the endless War against Terror. Although we will begin our study with the United Nations Declaration of Human Rights document of 1948 and reflect on famous “rights” texts such as Marx’s The Jewish Question and Hannah Arendt’s “The Decline of the Nation-State and the End of the Rights of Man,” our focus will be on a set of post-9/11 cultural texts, exploring the ways in which these texts play a significant role in negotiating the language of rights, often perpetuating, challenging, or recasting existing ways of understanding acts of injustice. We will read works by a range of writers, including Judith Butler, Edwidge Danticat, Óscar Martínez, Shailja Patel, Indra Sinha, as well as cultural texts such as Sebastião Salgado’s photographs of migrant workers, recent documentary films on the Syrian refugee crisis, and NGO publicity materials related to “building gender literacy and equality” in the Global South. This course satisfies the multicultural distribution requirement and counts as a 600-level seminar. Prerequisite: ENGL 513 or permission of the instructor.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 573 - 01 Professional Writing M - - R - - - 1800 - 2100 MHC 211

Days of Week:

M - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

MHC 211

Course Registration Number:

30252 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Fernando Sanchez

Professional writing is tied inherently to individuals and communities. This course examines professional writers' evolving roles as their public audiences become more heterogeneous. It also emphasizes the responsibility that all writers have for making their texts and documents inclusive. More specifically, we will consider accessibility issues for individuals with disabilities, feminist approaches to critiquing language and knowledge, and power differences in representations of ethnic and cultural minority groups in public documentation.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Fall 2017 Courses

Course - Section Title Days Time Location
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

M - - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42455 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

M. A. Easley

An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 522 - 01 The English Renaissance - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42456 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Raymond N. MacKenzie

The study of English drama, poetry, and prose of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries in relationship to the major themes and developments of the Continental Renaissance. Potential authors studied include Edmund Spenser, Christopher Marlowe, and William Shakespeare. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 547 - 01 19th-Century Amer Lit - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

- - W - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42457 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Laura R. Zebuhr

This course investigates a concept that is very intimately tied to commonplace narratives about the United States: freedom. Specifically, we will ask 19th-century literary and philosophical texts to help us think through the relationship between freedom and constraint. While we might perhaps think of freedom as the absence of constraint, such a conception of freedom makes it challenging to imagine our lives together, or to speak of “the common good.” We will look at how 19th-century texts theorize and represent what it might mean to be free. Secondary readings that introduce transnational philosophical and political debates about freedom and free will in the late 18th and 19th centuries, as well as slavery and emancipation, Indian Removal, immigration, and industrialization will frame our discussions.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 613 - 01 Feminisms in Thought & Action - T - - - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

- T - - - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42458 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Elizabeth L. Wilkinson

2.9 million marching for women’s rights and for human rights…. In the words of the 1960s rock band Buffalo Springfield, “There’s something happening here / What it is ain’t exactly clear / There’s a man with a gun over there / Telling me I got to beware / We better stop, children; what’s that sound / Everybody look what’s going ‘round….” In a lot of ways, it does feel like we have landed squarely in a twilight zone that harkens back to the protests of the 1960s. But it’s not 1967; it’s 2017. What is happening here? That’s what this course will examine, currently and historically, through a Woman’s Studies lens. We’ll be using a combination of the text Reading Feminist Theory by Susan Archer Mann and articles available digitally via Ms. Magazine in the Classroom and our library edition of Bitch magazine. We’ll look at the intersectionality at work in the world and in our small corner of it. Our goal will be to write conference level papers that could be presented at the National Women’s Studies Association Conference (NWSA) or the Feminisms and Rhetorics Conference (FemRhet) or any of a number of other conferences that focus on feminist / womanist scholarship.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 672 - 01 Literature & Sound Culture - - - R - - - 1800 - 2100

Days of Week:

- - - R - - -

Time of Day:

1800 - 2100

Location:

Course Registration Number:

42459 (View in ClassFinder)

Credit Hours:

3

Instructor:

Christopher S. Santiago

Potential topics may include the dialogue of self and other, the public intellectual and civic education, and discourse analysis. Credit may be earned more than once under this number for different emphases. Prerequisite: GENG 513 or permission of the instructor

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)