Shannon Scott portrait

Shannon Scott

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 345
Phone
(651) 962-5654

Werewolves, circuses, film noir detectives, and femme fatales--these are the themes of the English courses I teach. Each class is an exploration of lives lived on the edge of a tightrope or a knife, in the shadows of a sideshow tent or the silhouette of a smoking gun. What I love about teaching these topics is that no two classes are ever the same--new experiences, new texts and films, and, most importantly, new blood.

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 08 Noir in Film and Literature M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 MCH 230
CRN: 22470 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course explores the genre of noir in both film and literature beginning chronologically in post-World War II America. Historical context includes veterans returning from WWII (often the “heroes” of film noir), women’s changing roles after WWII (the femme fatale and early feminism), the Cold War, McCarthyism, and blacklisting in Hollywood. This background will provide a basis for the inspiration and success of film noir with American audiences. Texts used early in the course are often those adapted into film (James M. Cain’s DOUBLE INDEMNITY and Raymond Chandler’s THE BIG SLEEP). Emphasis in film is placed on the visual techniques used to create the mood/tone of film noir--its gritty subculture. As filmmakers fled Germany and Austria in the 1930s to work in Hollywood, techniques from German expressionist film helped to visually convey feelings of alienation, obsession, and instability fundamental to the genre (for example, Fritz Lang’s THE BIG HEAT, Billy Wilder’s DOUBLE INDEMNITY, and Otto Preminger’s LAURA). The second half of the course will focus on the genre of noir in postmodern literature and film. Cinematic examples of “retro-noir” (CHINATOWN, L.A. CONFIDENTIAL, and DEVIL IN A BLUE DRESS) are studied in conjunction with examples of “neo-noir” (MEMENTO, MULLHOLLAND DRIVE, FARGO, and KISS KISS BANG BANG). Contemporary literary examples of neo-noir, such Jonathan Lethem’s GUN WITH OCCASIONAL MUSIC, Janet Fitch’s "THE METHOD," and Naomi Hirahara's "NUMBER 15" are analyzed to see how noir returns in a twenty-first century, multicultural lens. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2015 Courses

Summer 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2015 Courses

Fall 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 04 Order Up: Literature of Food M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 232
CRN: 42696 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course will explore food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition, as well as a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. We'll first query our assumptions about how food is grown, raised, and prepared and ask what is "organic," what is "junk," what is "gourmet," and who decides? Who has access to "good food" in our country? What and where are "food deserts"? From an intertextual perspective, this course will include a community activism component involving food shelves and community gardens, as well as the screening of at least two films (perhaps THE BIG NIGHT and the film adaptation of Joanne Harris' CHOCOLAT), guest lecturers, an opportunity to write and prepare a "food memory/recipe," and a final collective meal. Possible texts for this course may include Chitra Divakaruni's THE MISTRESS OF SPICES, Laura Esquivel's LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, Lois-Ann Yamanaka's WILD MEAT AND THE BULLY BURGERS, Ruth Ozeki's MY YEAR OF MEATS, and Monica Ali's IN THE KITCHEN. We'll also likely read nonfiction accounts of food by famous American writers such as Herman Melville on clam chowder and Ralph Ellison on baked yams from the wonderful collection, AMERICAN FOOD WRITING. The texts, along with issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan, Meridel Le Sueur, and Vandana Shiva, to accounts of Julia Childs' connection to cuisine and espionage, to famous French chef Auguste Escoffier's connection to food and war, and to contemporary accusations of "food pornography" and "gluttony" leveled at the Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 07 Order Up: Literature of Food M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 232
CRN: 42698 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course will explore food as a cultural metaphor, as a means to connect, create, and sustain family and tradition, as well as a venue to examine history through a culinary lens. We'll first query our assumptions about how food is grown, raised, and prepared and ask what is "organic," what is "junk," what is "gourmet," and who decides? Who has access to "good food" in our country? What and where are "food deserts"? From an intertextual perspective, this course will include a community activism component involving food shelves and community gardens, as well as the screening of at least two films (perhaps THE BIG NIGHT and the film adaptation of Joanne Harris' CHOCOLAT), guest lecturers, an opportunity to write and prepare a "food memory/recipe," and a final collective meal. Possible texts for this course may include Chitra Divakaruni's THE MISTRESS OF SPICES, Laura Esquivel's LIKE WATER FOR CHOCOLATE, Lois-Ann Yamanaka's WILD MEAT AND THE BULLY BURGERS, Ruth Ozeki's MY YEAR OF MEATS, and Monica Ali's IN THE KITCHEN. We'll also likely read nonfiction accounts of food by famous American writers such as Herman Melville on clam chowder and Ralph Ellison on baked yams from the wonderful collection, AMERICAN FOOD WRITING. The texts, along with issues discussed in class, will range from the personal to the political: from essays by Michael Pollan, Meridel Le Sueur, and Vandana Shiva, to accounts of Julia Childs' connection to cuisine and espionage, to famous French chef Auguste Escoffier's connection to food and war, and to contemporary accusations of "food pornography" and "gluttony" leveled at the Food Network. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)