Shannon Scott portrait

Shannon Scott

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 316
Phone
(651) 962-5622
CV

Werewolves, circuses, film noir detectives, and femme fatales--these are the themes of the English courses I teach. Each class is an exploration of lives lived on the edge of a tightrope or a knife, in the shadows of a sideshow tent or the silhouette of a smoking gun. What I love about teaching these topics is that no two classes are ever the same--new experiences, new texts and films, and, most importantly, new blood.

In 2015, my article "Female Werewolf as Monstrous Other in Honoré Beaugrand's 'The Werewolves'" was published in She-Wolf: A Cultural History of Female Werewolves (U of Manchester Press).

Summer 2017 Courses

Summer 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W03 Howl in the Night: Werewolves M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 MCH 106
CRN: 42546 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course examines how wolves and werewolves have been portrayed and evolved in literature—from Ovid’s METAMORPHOSIS to Indigenous American creation stories to medieval Britain and France (BISCLAVRET, THE LAI DE MELION and ARTHUR AND GORLAGON) to the Victorian era (Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Clemence Housman) to contemporary film (THE WOLF MAN), art (Jazmina Cininas), and music (Warren Zevon, Blitzen Trapper, TV on the Radio). This course also explores the biology of wolves through the essays and photography of “Romeo” in Alaska, the fiction of Jack London, and Garry Marvin’s WOLF, which provides analysis of the wolf in popular culture. By looking at fairy tales, penny dreadfuls, poems, and art we will explore how wolves have been demonized, sympathized, glorified, and romanticized—how they have become monstrous in fiction as werewolves. Contemporary work from Neil Gaiman, Karen Russell, Michael Chabon, Ben Percy, and Marisa Silver further demonstrates how werewolf lore has shifted over time as our perception of wolves and wildness has similarly changed. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W04 Howl in the Night: Werewolves M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 MCH 106
CRN: 42547 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Shannon F. Scott This course examines how wolves and werewolves have been portrayed and evolved in literature—from Ovid’s METAMORPHOSIS to Indigenous American creation stories to medieval Britain and France (BISCLAVRET, THE LAI DE MELION and ARTHUR AND GORLAGON) to the Victorian era (Rudyard Kipling, Arthur Conan Doyle, Clemence Housman) to contemporary film (THE WOLF MAN), art (Jazmina Cininas), and music (Warren Zevon, Blitzen Trapper, TV on the Radio). This course also explores the biology of wolves through the essays and photography of “Romeo” in Alaska, the fiction of Jack London, and Garry Marvin’s WOLF, which provides analysis of the wolf in popular culture. By looking at fairy tales, penny dreadfuls, poems, and art we will explore how wolves have been demonized, sympathized, glorified, and romanticized—how they have become monstrous in fiction as werewolves. Contemporary work from Neil Gaiman, Karen Russell, Michael Chabon, Ben Percy, and Marisa Silver further demonstrates how werewolf lore has shifted over time as our perception of wolves and wildness has similarly changed. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location