Olga Herrera  portrait

Olga Herrera

Assistant Professor of English
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin
B.A., DePaul University
At St. Thomas since 2009
Office
JRC 313
Hours
(Fall 2014) M/W 12:00-1:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5613

My research examines the literary making of Chicago as a mythic place of work and opportunity for migrants and immigrants alike. In particular, I focus on how Chicago Latino and other writers of color have critiqued the image of the "City of Big Shoulders" in order to ask how race, class, and gender can affect one's access to work and urban experience. I am also interested in urban literature more generally and the construction of space, place, and community in fiction, poetry, and nonfiction. In my teaching and research, I enjoy discussing film and pop culture, with a focus on representations of race and gender.

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 201 - 01 Travel: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 227
CRN: 42358 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of the travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND-- as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 201 - 42 HONORS: Journey Narratives M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 227
CRN: 42391 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Whether we take a trip across campus or across an international border, our journeys have a way of changing the way we look at the world. Our outlook may shift through the people we meet along the way, or through overcoming unexpected challenges in order to get to the other side. In this class, we will experience journeys of all kinds, from physical travel to adventures in food, from those of the imagination to those of language. This course examines the conventions of and development within the genre of travel narrative across literary history. We will examine two classics of travel--THE ODYSSEY (in graphic novel format) and ALICE IN WONDERLAND--as a starting point for looking at the way novelists, memoirists, poets, artists, and filmmakers have envisioned the transformative effects of journeys. Other texts may include Christopher Bakken's HONEY, OLIVES, AND OCTOPUS, Amy Leach's THINGS THAT ARE, Charles Frazier's COLD MOUNTAIN, Joel and Ethan Coen's O BROTHER WHERE ART THOU, and poetry from Emily Dickinson. We may also include our own journeys outside of the classroom walls. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for Aquinas Honors Scholars Program students only.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 215 - 01 American Authors II M - W - - - - 1335 - 1510 SCB 324
CRN: 40681 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera The study of significant American authors from the turn of the century to the present. This survey course will consider the diverse literary, cultural, and historical contexts from which the American literary tradition has been formed. Possible authors studied include Hemingway, Faulkner, Hurston, Wright, Morrison, Cather, Wharton, Rich, and O'Neill. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 204 - 01 Literacy in Contemporary Amer M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 JRC 301
CRN: 22479 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera This course examines artifacts of language and literature in their function as social and cultural phenomena. The course will explore angles of analysis appropriate to the study of one or more of the following: everyday language, public rhetoric, or the various forms of mass and popular culture (film, music, blogging/texting). The course may also examine essential but critically contested concepts such as literacy , culture, or literature. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 204 - 02 Literacy in Contemporary Amer M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 301
CRN: 22480 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera This course examines artifacts of language and literature in their function as social and cultural phenomena. The course will explore angles of analysis appropriate to the study of one or more of the following: everyday language, public rhetoric, or the various forms of mass and popular culture (film, music, blogging/texting). The course may also examine essential but critically contested concepts such as literacy , culture, or literature. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 304 - 01 Analytical/Persuasive Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301
CRN: 21383 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Olga L. Herrera Intended for the experienced writer this course will emphasize the theory and practice of writing in analytical, persuasive and research-based rhetorical modes as preparation for advanced or professional writing in a variety of disciplines. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204. --

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)