Michael Raimondi

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 316
Hours
(Spring 2016) T/R 11:45am-12:45pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5622

Spring 2016 Courses

Spring 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W16 Play Ball: Baseball Literature - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 MHC 210
CRN: 22527 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Michael Raimondi Bernard Malamud once wrote that "The whole history of baseball has the quality of mythology." This course will examine a variety of writings about our baseball heroes, the men and women who played the game that we call "our national pastime." We'll also look at our country's romanticism with baseball and how writers who wrote about baseball helped give the sport its mythological dimensions. Selections will include essays, short stories, and poetry by authors who loved the game. Likely titles to be read include Jim Bouton's BALL FOUR, Roger Angell's GAME TIME: A BASEBALL COMPANION, Brooke Horvath's LINE DRIVES: 100 CONTEMPORARY BASEBALL POEMS, and WILLIE'S BOYS: THE 1948 BIRMINGHAM BLACK BARONS, THE LAST NEGRO LEAGUE WORLD SERIES AND THE MAKING OF A BASEBALL LEGEND. Please note that this class will have a service learning component. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W13 Without a Home: Refugee Lit - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 SCB 325
CRN: 42614 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Michael Raimondi The inscription on the Statue of Liberty reads: “Give me your tired, your poor, / Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free / The wretched refuse of your teeming shore / Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed to me, / I lift my lamp beside the golden door!" Recent fighting in Syria and elsewhere in the Middle East has forced countless numbers of civilians to flee their homes, not only resulting in mass migrations of refugees to nearby European countries and other safe havens around the world, but also straining humanitarian resources such as food supplies and housing. This migration has also forced those countries and safe havens—including the United States—to confront issues related to national identity and human values. In this class, we’ll use a variety of texts to explore what it means to be a refugee and ask whether or not a person ever stops being one; we’ll also examine, through a refugee’s eyes, the degree to which the United States is upholding its identity as a nation born from immigrants and ask whether or not its values in regards to “the huddled masses” and “homeless” are changing. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)