Martin Warren  portrait

Martin Warren

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
M.A., St. John's University (Minnesota)
At St. Thomas since 1998
Office
JRC 307
Hours
(Fall 2016) M 4:00-5:40pm; W 1:00-2:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5665
CV

I am a medievalist whose main area of concentration is the 14th and 15th centuries. Besides teaching Chaucer, I teach the literature of King Arthur from its beginnings to the present day. Tolkien is a favorite of mine, especially since he was a medievalist. When I teach Tolkien, I teach about the medieval background to his major literary works such as The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. Other areas that I work in are literary theory and science fiction. What fascinates me about science fiction is how it helps us to ask all kinds of great questions about how life and the universe works, whether it’s religious, political, or philosophical questions. At present, I am working on a project to do with the Gawain-poet who wrote the excellent poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301
CRN: 41610 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 521 - 01 Medieval Lit in Context M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42436 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren This course will introduce you to the vernacular-language literature of the British Middle Ages–the foundation upon which modern English literature stands. In addition to presenting a number of important medieval authors and works, this course will familiarize you with medieval attitudes toward authorship and textuality, with medieval modes of textual production, transmission and reception, and with specific textual practices relevant to the interpretation of medieval literature. Readings have been chosen as examples of the major literary genres practiced in the Middle Ages, genres such as epic, elegy, lyric, dream vision, romance, Breton lai, autobiography and drama. All readings except materials from the "Canterbury Tales" will be read in modern translations. By the end of the semester, you will be familiar with the significant English-language authors and works of the 8th to 15th centuries and have an understanding of the historical development of vernacular English literature during that period. In all of this, the course will offer, just as the medieval arts themselves were supposed to, the ideal union of “sentence and solas”—instruction and entertainment. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 698 - 02 Independent Reading - - - - - - - -
CRN: 42274 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren

Schedule Details

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J-Term 2017 Courses

J-Term 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2017 Courses

Spring 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 221 - L01 The Modern Tradition M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301
CRN: 20087 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren What might it mean to speak of “the modern tradition”? What does that include and exclude? And how does it matter to us today? How does the modern tradition help us understand about concepts such as authorship, originality, literacy, and literary excellence? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings of representative texts of Western literature in translation from the seventeenth century through the present, including some interactions of the European traditions with modern African, Latin American, or Asian literatures.Authors may include Racine, Goethe, Flaubert, Dostoevsky, Rilke, Solzhenitsyn, Duras, Lispector, and Achebe. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 325 - L11 Tolkien: Middle Ages/Earth M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 227
CRN: 21871 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren J.R.R. Tolkien is best known for THE HOBBIT and THE LORD OF THE RINGS, works that have been popular since they were first published. As an Oxford Professor and eminent medievalist, he wrote out of what he knew about Old English, Old Norse, and Middle English literature. He was a ground-breaking medieval scholar who loved his work so much that he created fictional works rooted in the language and traditions of the Anglo-Saxon, Norse, Gothic, and Celtic cultures that he studied. This course explores Tolkien's work as rooted in ancient and medieval legends, mythologies, and literary genres and practices. We will seek to understand Tolkien's achievement both in its own right and as the continuation of the classical and medieval narrative traditions it both springs from and renews. Among the topics to be dealt with: Tolkien's understanding of mythology and "faerie story"; Germanic and Finnish mythology; Anglo-Saxon literature; Celtic legend and mythology; the genre of medieval romance; his critics; and the silver screen. THIS IS NOT A COURSE FOR BEGINNERS NEW TO THE WORKS OF TOLKIEN OR FOR THOSE WHO HAVE SEEN ONLY PETER JACKSON'S MOVIE VERSIONS. Prior knowledge of THE HOBBIT and THE LORD OF THE RINGS will provide the foundation for much of our analysis. This course fulfills the Early Literature distribution requirement for English majors who started at St. Thomas prior to Fall 2015. For students who started at St. Thomas in Fall 2015 or later, this course satisfies a Context and Convergences distribution requirement. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)