Martin Warren  portrait

Martin Warren

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
M.A., St. John's University (Minnesota)
At St. Thomas since 1998
Office
JRC 307
Hours
(Spring 2016) M 10:30-11:30am; W 3:30-5:30pm; F 10:30-11:30am; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5665

I am a medievalist whose main area of concentration is the 14th and 15th centuries. Besides teaching Chaucer, I teach the literature of King Arthur from its beginnings to the present day. Tolkien is a favorite of mine, especially since he was a medievalist. When I teach Tolkien, I teach about the medieval background to his major literary works such as The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. Other areas that I work in are literary theory and science fiction. What fascinates me about science fiction is how it helps us to ask all kinds of great questions about how life and the universe works, whether it’s religious, political, or philosophical questions. At present, I am working on a project to do with the Gawain-poet who wrote the excellent poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Spring 2016 Courses

Spring 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W08 Faith & Values: Wrestling God M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301
CRN: 21905 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren This class will explore how writers imagine the divine and how their faith informs their writing. Investigating the works of such authors as Denise Levertov, Robert Bolt, Graham Greene, and Gerard Manley Hopkins, we will critically evaluate how these writers wrestle with daily life as they (a) search for identity and integrity, and (b) wrestle with the problem of suffering and evil. Paying particular attention to how writers picture God in the context of personal and social concerns, our texts will reflect people’s experience dealing with life events, boredom, crises, losses, disappointments, and unexpected touches of grace. Some texts may be painful to read while others may be funny or joyful (just like life itself). The hope is that these readings will deepen our understanding of the human experience of God and of the struggle to maintain and live out one’s faith. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Intensive Writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W10 Faith & Values: Wrestling God M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 301
CRN: 21909 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren This class will explore how writers imagine the divine and how their faith informs their writing. Investigating the works of such authors as Denise Levertov, Robert Bolt, Graham Greene, and Gerard Manley Hopkins, we will critically evaluate how these writers wrestle with daily life as they (a) search for identity and integrity, and (b) wrestle with the problem of suffering and evil. Paying particular attention to how writers picture God in the context of personal and social concerns, our texts will reflect people’s experience dealing with life events, boredom, crises, losses, disappointments, and unexpected touches of grace. Some texts may be painful to read while others may be funny or joyful (just like life itself). The hope is that these readings will deepen our understanding of the human experience of God and of the struggle to maintain and live out one’s faith. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Intensive Writing requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 495 - I2 Individual Study - - - - - - - -
CRN: 22937 2 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism - - W - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 401
CRN: 22353 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 698 - 02 Independent Reading - - - - - - - -
CRN: 23023 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 211 - L01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1055 - 1200 JRC 301
CRN: 41610 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren How have heroic ideals changed from Beowulf to the 18th century? How did marriage evolve from an arrangement between tribes and families to love between two people? Such questions will be explored in a chronological framework through extensive readings in the British literary tradition in the period from approximately 900-1780. Threaded throughout the literature are themes such as war and conflict, the history of love, humor and satire, social reform, religious reform and the rights of the individual. This course fulfills the Historical Perspectives requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 521 - 01 Medieval Literature M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 42436 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren The study of English literature from its beginning to 1485. Readings may include BEOWULF, selections from Old English poetry, THE PEARL poet, medieval drama, Langland, Marie de France, Malory, and Chaucer. This course satisfies the pre-1830 British Literature distribution requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Undergraduate Admissions

Graduate Admissions

Jobs at UST