Martin Warren  portrait

Martin Warren

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D., University of Minnesota
M.A., St. John's University (Minnesota)
At St. Thomas since 1998
Office
JRC 307
Hours
(Fall 2014) M 4:30-5:30pm; W 3:00-4:30pm; F 10:30-11:30am; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5665

I am a medievalist whose main area of concentration is the 14th and 15th centuries. Besides teaching Chaucer, I teach the literature of King Arthur from its beginnings to the present day. Tolkien is a favorite of mine, especially since he was a medievalist. When I teach Tolkien, I teach about the medieval background to his major literary works such as The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit. Other areas that I work in are literary theory and science fiction. What fascinates me about science fiction is how it helps us to ask all kinds of great questions about how life and the universe works, whether it’s religious, political, or philosophical questions. At present, I am working on a project to do with the Gawain-poet who wrote the excellent poem, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight.

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 211 - 01 British Authors I M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 301
CRN: 42928 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren This course will focus on extensive reading of a broad selection of British authors from the medieval period through the eighteenth century. Students will engage in close analysis of literary texts by such authors as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, and Behn, with some attention to historical and cultural contexts. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 513 - 01 Issues in Criticism M - - - - - - 1800 - 2100 JRC 481
CRN: 40157 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Martin L. Warren An introduction to the principal theoretical issues and questions in the discipline of literary studies. The course explores the major contemporary approaches to literary studies in the context of various traditions of literary theory and criticism. It encourages students to assess constructively some of the key controversies in contemporary critical theory and apply their learning to the interpretation of literary texts. This required course must be taken as one of the first three courses in the program.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location