Lucy Saliger

Instructor of English
Office
JRC 310
Hours
(Fall 2014) T/R 3:10-4:10pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5657

Fall 2014 Courses

Fall 2014 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - 17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 212
CRN: 41324 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - 24 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 212
CRN: 41330 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - 10 Behind Bars:Voices from Prison - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 OEC 212
CRN: 42489 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger Incarceration seldom appears at the forefront of public concern--despite the millions of Americans behind bars. State-of-the-art forensics and brilliant investigative techniques on CRIMINAL MINDS, CSI, and other "crime" shows help convince the public that those arrested must be guilty, but how realistic are these portrayals? This course uses prison literature to show the invisible world of criminal justice. Through memoirs, letters, poems, essays, and autobiographies, the incarcerated and social analysts bear witness to religious, racial, social, and political oppression and to disparities of punishment in America. Likely authors to be studied include Leonard Peltier, Jimmy Santiago Baca, Martin Luther King, Jr., Dorothy Day, Etheridge Knight, Michelle Alexander, Michal G. Santos, and Doris Lessing. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2015 Courses

J-Term 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2015 Courses

Spring 2015 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - 13 American Idealism:Upward Bound - T - R - - - 0955 - 1135 JRC 222
CRN: 22475 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Lucy A. Saliger As a nation and as individuals, we rely on stories of ascension to prove that those willing and able to learn, work hard, and create something worthy can rise in our society. Yet these tales which in one sense work to show fairness in our system and provide inspiration and hope simultaneously complicate and contest these ideals. Accounts of individuals who beat the odds in their moves "up" inherently reveal that there are odds to beat. At the same time, individual efforts are sometimes bound to collective yearnings and struggles. In this course, we explore tensions and contradictions embedded in these narratives, paying attention to how they affect us individually and the work they do in our society. We'll examine stories (nonfiction, novels, poems, and songs) of individual or collective ascension – or attempted and perhaps failed ascension. Texts may include parts of Benjamin Franklin's autobiography; Thoreau's "CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE"; Francisco Jimenez’s chronicle of his and his family’s lives as (initially) undocumented migrant workers from his early childhood through his undergraduate years; and Edwidge Danticat's BROTHER I'M DYING. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)