Kanishka Chowdhury  portrait

Kanishka Chowdhury

Professor of English / Director of American Culture & Difference Minor
Degree
M.A., Ph.D., Purdue University
B.A., St. Xavier's College, Calcutta (India)
At St. Thomas since 1993
Office
JRC 342
Hours
(Spring 2016) By appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5646

I’m interested in the ways that culture, politics, ethics, and aesthetics intersect, so in all of my classes we analyze texts as part of complex social formations and in specific historical contexts. Recently, I’ve taught courses on cultural studies, immigrant literatures, Marxist theory, transnational literatures, and writing and resistance. I’ve also written on many of these topics, as well as on contemporary India—the connections between its emerging forms of citizenship and neoliberal economic changes. Lately I have been researching transnational human rights discourse, trying to understand more clearly how that discourse names, locates, and categorizes subjects who are positioned as victims of injustice.

Spring 2016 Courses

Spring 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ACST 200 - 01 Intro to Amer. Culture & Diff. - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 MHC 210
CRN: 20003 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury In ACST 200, students learn about the historical and theoretical foundations of Cultural Studies as an academic discipline and use cultural theory to analyze a variety of cultural products and representations. In this course, students look specifically at dominant and subversive constructions of gender, race, ethnicity, national and sexual identities, and how these constructions are deployed through cultural practices and productions such as sports, film and television, folklore and popular culture, youth subcultures, music, and so on. For example, the course may contain units on "nation" and the creation of American mythologies; the process of hero-making in American history; stereotypes and the representation of race and ethnicity in television and film; representations of gender and sexuality in advertising; as well as a section on American music from jazz, blues, folk and roots music, to rock and roll, punk, and hip-hop. This course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement in the core curriculum.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
FILM 300 - 01 World Cinema - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 MHC 210
CRN: 21320 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury In this course, students will view, discuss, and read and write about feature-length films from Africa, Asia, the Americas, Europe, and possibly India and/or the Middle East. Following critical viewing of films both in and outside of class, students will engage in critical reflection, discussion, and analytical writing as a way of practicing the art of film analysis. This course asks students to think critically about the ways in which cinema engages the world as a form of entertainment, as art, as historical document, and as an instrument of social change. The course fulfills the Human Diversity requirement of the core curriculum at UST by addressing issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and geopolitical status. It scrutinizes the ways in which institutionalized and structural power and privilege are reflected in the subject matter, creation, and audience reception of film. Prerequisite: FILM 200

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 698 - 01 Independent Reading - - - - - - - -
CRN: 22965 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
GENG 699 - 01 Master's Essay - - - - - - - -
CRN: 22711 3 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

Summer 2016 Courses

Summer 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Fall 2016 Courses

Fall 2016 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 110 - PW3 Intensive Writing - T - R - - - 1330 - 1510 JRC 301
CRN: 40098 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury The course provides students with intensive practice in writing, enabling them to adapt to the demands of differing rhetorical contexts. Emphasis on understanding writing processes and learning to respond thoughtfully to writing at various stages. Critical reading will be practiced as an integral part of the writing process. Prerequisite: participation in the Academic Development Program

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 217 - L01 Multicultural Literature - T - R - - - 1525 - 1700 JRC 222
CRN: 40402 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Kanishka Chowdhury It is common, especially during the election season, to hear politicians proclaim “truths” and “facts” about immigrants’ lives, even though most of them have little experience of the complex realities of those lives. There is, for instance, no such thing as a homogenous immigrant experience. An immigrant’s life in this country is determined by multiple factors, such as race, class, gender, sexuality, national origin, and religion. In this course, we will study a range of post-9/11 immigrant narratives, focusing on the multiple ways in which immigrants have negotiated questions related to citizenship, state persecution, segregated labor practices, historical memory, and intergenerational conflicts over the last fifteen years. We will read works by writers such as Teju Cole, Edwidge Danticatt, Mohsin Hamid, Cristina Henríquez, Jhumpa Lahiri, Óscar Martínez, and Dinaw Mengestu. We will also read a range of theoretical and historical works that will help us understand the social, political, and economic factors that determine the realities of these myriad lives. Students will be responsible for a comprehensive presentation and will write blogs, short papers, and a research paper. This course satisfies the core Human Diversity requirement and the Diversity Literature distribution requirement for English majors. Prerequisite: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)