Juan Li  portrait

Juan Li

Associate Professor of English
Degree
Ph.D. in English, University of Washington
M.A. in English, Kansas State University
M.A. in Applied Linguistics, The Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
B.A. The Central University of Nationalities in China, Beijing, China
At St. Thomas since 2006
Office
JRC 312
Hours
(Fall 2017) T 9:30am-12:00pm; F 3:00-5:00pm; also by appointment
Phone
(651) 962-5627
CV

As a linguist, I am interested in ways in which speakers and writers use language to meet their changing needs in daily life. My research focuses on how our use of language in various contexts may affect our relationships with others, and how our perceptions of the world are shaped by our language. I enjoy teaching Introduction to Linguistics and other courses examining the intertwining relationship between language and society. Recently, I have developed a special interest in second language writing and reading.

Fall 2017 Courses

Fall 2017 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 121 - W17 Critical Thinking: Lit/Writing M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 OEC 207
CRN: 40977 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 121 - W51 Crit Thinking: Lit/Wrtng (ESL) M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 329
CRN: 41131 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li Students will read and write about literary texts critically and closely. The course emphasizes recursive reading and writing processes that encourage students to discover, explain, question and clarify ideas. To this end, students will study a variety of genres as well as terms and concepts helpful to close analysis of those genres. They will practice various forms of writing for specific audiences and purposes. Students will reflect on and develop critical awareness of their own strengths and weaknesses as readers and writers. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 12 pages of formal revised writing. Please note that this section is reserved for English as a Second Language students.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 305 - 01 Linguistics: English Lang M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 OEC 207
CRN: 40091 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li This course is an introduction to the systematic study of the English language, with an emphasis on connections between academic linguistics and relevant social and educational questions. Students will study the English sound system through phonetics and phonology, how words are formed through morphology, how words combine to create clauses and meaning through syntax and semantics. After learning the linguistic tools to describe the English language, students will examine the contexts of language production in real life through the study of U.S. dialects, historical and ongoing changes in English, and various social interactions in language. This course fulfills the Theory and Practice requirement in the English major. Prerequisites: ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)

J-Term 2018 Courses

J-Term 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location

Spring 2018 Courses

Spring 2018 Courses
Course - Section Title Days Time Location
ENGL 203 - W09 Home Sweet Home M - W - F - - 1335 - 1440 JRC 414
CRN: 22267 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li What does “home” mean to you? Is it a place where you live and can truly be yourself within protected boundaries? Is it a feeling of love, comfort, peace, and security that you share with your family? Is it a sense of belonging, feeling welcome and valued when you move to a new place? When one is born in one geographical location (e.g., a country, a city) but moves to another, where is one’s home? This course examines the concept of “home” in literature and relates it to specific social, historical, and political contexts in which writers represent their senses of being home and homeless. By reading a variety of literary works – novels, poems, essays, and memoirs, by writers such as Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, Gloria Anzaldua, Eva Hoffman, and Bharati Mukherjee, we will investigate how meanings of literary “homes” are often bound up with issues of memory, hope, loss, language, race, regionalism, and globalization, all of which are central to our contemporary life. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 203 - W51 Living in America: Home (ESL) M - W - F - - 1215 - 1320 JRC 481
CRN: 21398 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li This English as a Second Language section of ENGL 203 explores how the notion of "home" is represented in literature. It invites students to reflect on what "home" means to them, especially when living overseas. Is it a geographical location (the country and city they were born in and/or live in)? Is it an emotional bond with family members and other people like themselves? Is it a sense of shelter, comfort, safety, and being welcome when they move to a new place? When one is born in a country but moves to another, where is one's home? In this course, we will explore the many ways writers have represented their senses of home and senses of being homeless in a variety of literary works--novels, poems, and memoirs. We will investigate through our readings and discussions how our senses of home are often bound up with issues such as memory, hope, loss, regionalism, alientation, and globalization. The writing load for this course is a minimum of 15 pages of formal revised writing. This course satisfies the Writing Across the Curriculum Writing Intensive requirement.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)
ENGL 325 - L01 History of English Language M - W - F - - 0935 - 1040 SCB 107
CRN: 21701 4 Credit Hours Instructor: Juan Li Why is the pronoun "she" the word of the millenium? How did English spelling become the "world's most awesome mess," as Mario Pei puts it? This course invites you to examine the dramatic and interesting ways in which the English language has changed over the past 1200 years--from a liitle known dialect spoken on a British Isle to a global language spoken by 500 million people around the world as their native tongue. We will study the stages of the "life" of English, beginning with Old English and continuing through Middle English, Early Modern English, and into present-day English. We will consider both internal linguistic changes of the language as well as cultural and literary events that caused changes. In this process of investigating the language's past, we will also reflect on its present and look ahead to its future. By the end of the term, you will gain proficiency in describing the evolution of the English language. You will also have opportunities to apply your knowledge of the history of English to your own areas of interest--literary historical studies, colonial and post-colonial studies, language studies, and the teaching of writing. No background in linguistics is required for this course. The only prerequisite---other than an ENGL 201, 202, 203, or 204 class--is your enthusiasm in studying the changes of the English language. This course satisfes the Theory and Practice requirement for English majors.

Schedule Details

Location Time Day(s)